Yuko Mizunaga

Yamaguchi University, Yamaguti, Yamaguchi, Japan

Are you Yuko Mizunaga?

Claim your profile

Publications (7)21.86 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 2003, we started autologous bone marrow cell infusion (ABM i ) therapy for treating liver cirrhosis. ABM i therapy uses 400 mL of autologous bone marrow obtained under general anesthesia and infused mononuclear cell from peripheral vein. The clinical study expanded and we treated liver cirrhosis induced by HCV and HBV infection and alcohol consumption. We found that the ABM i therapy was effective for cirrhosis patients and now we are treating patients with combined HIV and HCV infection and with metabolic syndrome-induced liver cirrhosis. Currently, in order to substantiate our findings that liver cirrhosis can be successfully treated by the ABM i therapy, we are conducting randomized multi-center clinical studies designated "Advanced medical technology B" for HCV-related liver cirrhosis in Japan. On the basis of our clinical study, we developed a proof-of-concept showing that infusion of bone marrow cells improved liver fibrosis and sequentially activated proliferation of hepatic progenitor cells and hepatocytes, further promoting restoration of liver functions. To treat patients with severe forms of liver cirrhosis, we continued translational research to develop less invasive therapies by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow. We obtained a small quantity of bone marrow cells under local anesthesia and expanded them into mesenchymal stem cells that will then be used for treating cirrhosis. In this review, we present our strategy to apply the results of our laboratory research to clinical studies.
    Tissue Engineering Part B Reviews 01/2014; DOI:10.1089/ten.TEB.2013.0527 · 4.64 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We previously described the effectiveness of autologous bone marrow cell infusion (ABMi) therapy for patients with liver cirrhosis (LC). We analyzed chronological changes in 19 serum cytokines as well as levels of specific cytokines in patients after ABMi therapy and in a mouse model of cirrhosis generated using green fluorescent protein (GFP)/carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). We measured expression profiles of cytokines in serum samples collected from 13 patients before and at 1 day and 1 week after ABMi. Child-Pugh scores significantly improved in all of these patients. To analyze the meaning of early cytokine change, we infused GFP-positive bone marrow cells (BMC) into mice with CCl4-induced LC and obtained serum and tissue samples at 1 day and as well as at 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks later. We compared chronological changes in serum cytokine expression in humans and in the model mice at 1 day and 1 week after BMC infusion. Among 19 cytokine, both granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in serum was found to show same chronological change pattern between human and mice model. Next we examined changes in cytokine expression in cirrhosis liver before, at 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after BMC infusion. Both G-CSF and IL-1β were undetectable in the liver tissues before and at 1 week after BMC infusion, but increased at 2 weeks and continued until 4 weeks after infusion. The infused BMC induced an early decrease of both G-CSF and IL-1β in serum and an increase in the model mice with LC. These dynamic cytokine changes might be important to repair liver cirrhosis after BMC infusion.
    Cell Transplantation 04/2012; DOI:10.3727/096368912X638856 · 3.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Liver cirrhosis patients generally progress to liver failure. To cure this progressive disease, we developed a novel cell therapy using bone marrow cells; autologous bone marrow cell infusion (ABMi) therapy. We previously described the possible action mechanism of ABMi therapy in the cirrhotic liver, and showed the timeline and results of clinical studies of ABMi therapy. We have also carried out other clinical studies using bone marrow cells and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Here, we report a new randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effects of ABMi therapy. However, ABMi therapy may not be possible in patients who are unable to undergo general anesthesia; therefore, we have started to develop a next-generation stem cell therapy using cultured mesenchymal stem cells.
    Journal of Gastroenterology 04/2012; 47(5):491-7. DOI:10.1007/s00535-012-0580-5 · 4.02 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 2003, we initiated a clinical trial to examine autologous bone marrow cell infusion (ABMi) therapy for cirrhotic patients and reported the clinical effect of the therapy. To analyze how splenectomy may potentiate the effects of bone marrow cell infusion on cirrhosis, we performed a mouse study and a clinical trial on patients with cirrhosis. In mice, we analyzed the effect of splenectomy on bone marrow cell infusion in four experimental groups (group A, splenectomy + bone marrow cell infusion + CCl(4); group B, sham operation + bone marrow cell infusion + CCl(4); group C, splenectomy + CCl(4); group D, sham operation + CCl(4)). In clinical, we compared the effect of splenectomy on ABMi therapy. We observed significantly increased average serum albumin levels and higher expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in the livers of group A. We observed MMP9/GFP double-positive cells in the cirrhotic livers. A significant decrease in the liver fibrosis areas was observed in group A. Splenectomy enhanced the repopulation of bone marrow cells into the cirrhotic liver and improved the liver microenvironment via expression of MMP9 secreted from repopulating GFP-positive cells. Next, we performed a clinical trial to compare the effect of splenectomy on the efficacy of ABMi therapy. Cirrhotic patients who underwent splenectomy before ABMi therapy tended to have a greater improvement in liver function. ABMi therapy with splenectomy may be an effective therapeutic modality for cirrhosis.
    Journal of Gastroenterology 11/2011; 47(3):300-12. DOI:10.1007/s00535-011-0486-7 · 4.02 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We have previously shown that infusion of bone marrow cells (BMC) improves CCl(4)-induced cirrhosis. However, it is unclear why the injected BMC are resistant to CCl(4) damage and subsequently improve the local microenvironment in damaged liver. To analyze the cellular phenomena involved in this process, we studied the damaged liver using electron microscopy. We found that CCl(4) caused rough endoplasmic reticula to swell in hepatocytes. To analyze the gene expression patterns associated with this process, we conducted PCR-selected suppressive subtractive hybridization. We found that expression levels of HSP84, HSP40, and XBP1 differed markedly between control liver and liver infused with BMC. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that expression levels of HSP84 and HSP40 were markedly higher in the early phase of differentiation immediately after BMC infusion, but decreased over time. XBP1 expression remained high during the late phase, and GRP78 expression increased with XBP1 activation. We also found that GFP-positive BMC expressed XBP1 and GRP78. XBP1 and GRP78 are associated with ER stress. Thus, continuous high XBP1 and GRP78 expression might be essential for the survival and proliferation of BMC in a CCl(4)-induced persistent liver damage environment.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 04/2008; 367(3):546-52. DOI:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.12.171 · 2.28 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A 74-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital to treat her hepatocellular carcinoma (stage IVB) with multiple lung metastases. She was treated with 3 times of hepatic arterial infusion of cisplatin powder (IA-call). After the treatment, liver mass and lung tumors were disappeared and high levels of tumor markers (AFP and PIVKA-II) were markedly decreased. These data revealed that a complete response (CR) was obtained for her. She has still been maintained in CR for 2 years since the first treatment.
    Nippon Shokakibyo Gakkai zasshi The Japanese journal of gastro-enterology 01/2008; 104(12):1738-44.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We previously reported that fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) facilitated the differentiation of transplanted bone marrow cells (BMCs) into hepatocytes. Our earlier study also demonstrated that administration of FGF2 in combination with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) synergistically activated tumor necrosis factor-alpha signaling and significantly improved liver function and prognosis more than BMT alone. However, the way that it affected the extracellular matrix remained unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of FGF2 treatment together with BMT on liver fibrosis in mice treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)). Transplantation of BMCs and concurrent treatment with FGF2 caused a statistically significant reduction in CCl(4)-induced liver fibrosis that was accompanied by strong expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 as compared with FGF2-only treatment or BMT alone. Moreover, in this process, the proliferation of bone-marrow-derived cells was accelerated without causing apoptosis. Thus, the administration of FGF2 in combination with BMT synergistically improves CCl(4)-induced liver fibrosis in mice. This treatment has the potential of being an effective therapy for patients with liver cirrhosis.
    Cell and Tissue Research 04/2007; 327(3):463-70. DOI:10.1007/s00441-006-0334-x · 3.33 Impact Factor