Daniel Kamin

Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States

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Publications (9)69.1 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We report an adolescent with chronic, recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding in whom extensive prior investigations failed to reveal the source of bleeding. Angiography accurately identified a bleeding Dieulafoy lesion of the duodenum which was successfully embolized. The clinical history, angiographic appearances and treatment of this rare lesion are presented.
    Journal of Pediatric Surgery 01/2013; 48(1):e39-e41. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Children with intestinal failure (IF) are at risk for small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) because of anatomical and other factors. We sought to identify risk factors for SBBO confirmed by quantitative duodenal culture. A single-center retrospective record review of children who had undergone endoscopic evaluation for SBBO (defined as bacterial growth in duodenal fluid of >10(5) colony-forming unit per mL) was performed. We reviewed 57 children with median (25th-75th percentile) age 5.0 (2.0-9.2) years. Diagnoses included motility disorders (28%), necrotizing enterocolitis (16%), atresias (16%), gastroschisis (14%), and Hirschsprung disease (10.5%). Forty patients (70%) had confirmed SBBO. Univariate analysis showed no significant differences between patients with and without SBBO for the following variables: age, sex, diagnosis, presence of ileocecal valve, and antacid use. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) were more likely to have SBBO (70% vs 35%, P = .02). Multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed that PN administration was independently associated with SBBO (adjusted odds ratio, 5.1; adjusted 95% confidence interval, 1.4-18.3; P = .01). SBBO was not related to subsequent risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). SBBO is strongly and independently associated with PN use. Larger prospective cohorts and more systematic sampling techniques are needed to better determine the relationship between SBBO and gastrointestinal function.
    Journal of Pediatric Surgery 06/2012; 47(6):1150-4. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal dysmotility is common in pediatric short-bowel syndrome, leading to prolonged parenteral nutrition dependence. There is limited literature regarding the safety and efficacy of cisapride for this indication. The aim of the study was to describe the safety and efficacy of cisapride for enteral intolerance in pediatric short-bowel syndrome. Open-labeled pilot study in a limited access program for cisapride. Indications were short-bowel syndrome with underlying dysmotility and difficulty advancing enteral feeds despite standard therapies and without evidence of anatomic obstruction. Patients received cisapride 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg per dose for 3 to 4 doses per day. We collected electrocardiogram, nutrition, and anthropometric data prospectively at study visits. Ten patients with mean (SD) age of 30.3 (30.5) months were enrolled in our multidisciplinary pediatric intestinal rehabilitation program. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) duration of follow-up was 8.7 (3.1-14.3) months. Median (IQR) residual bowel length was 102 (85-130) cm. Median (IQR) citrulline level was 14.5 (10.5-31.3) ╬╝mol/L. Diagnoses included isolated gastroschisis (n = 3), gastroschisis with intestinal atresia (n = 4), necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 2), and long-segment Hirschsprung disease (n = 1). Six subjects had at least 1 prior bowel-lengthening procedure. Median (IQR) change in percentage enteral energy intake was 19.9% (15.4%-29.8%) during follow-up (P = 0.01). Seven patients improved in enteral tolerance during treatment and 2 were weaned completely from parenteral nutrition. Complications during therapy were prolonged corrected QT interval (n = 2), gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 2), D-lactic acidosis (n = 1), and death due to presumed sepsis (n = 1). Longitudinal analysis (general estimating equation model) showed a strong positive association between cisapride duration and improved enteral tolerance. Mean percentage of enteral intake increased by 2.9% for every month of cisapride treatment (P < 0.0001). Cisapride is a potentially useful therapy in patients with pediatric short-bowel syndrome with gastrointestinal dysmotility. We observed modest improvement in feeding tolerance where prior treatments failed; however, patients treated with cisapride require careful cardiac monitoring because corrected QT prolongation occurred in 20% of our cohort.
    Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 05/2011; 52(5):590-4. · 2.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report 3 patients with periosteal new bone formation consistent with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA), in the context of intestinal allograft rejection. Patient 1 developed thick periosteal new bone formation of the right arm during a prolonged episode of intestinal acute cellular rejection (ACR) 2 months posttransplant. Patient 2 developed ankle pain and swelling during an episode of severe ACR. Plain films showed periosteal new bone formation of the left ankle. In patient 3, the right wrist became swollen during an episode of moderate ACR, whereas plain films demonstrated mild periosteal reaction. Patients 2 and 3 had resolution of their symptoms once the ACR resolved with treatment. This is the first case series of HOA occurring in association with intestinal ACR. We speculate that an immune-mediated process is responsible for the bone disease. Further inquiry will help establish if HOA is related to transplant status, intestinal inflammation, or allograft rejection in general.
    Journal of Pediatric Surgery 11/2010; 45(11):e19-22. · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • Daniel S Kamin, Sandra Burchett, Heung Bae Kim
    New England Journal of Medicine 09/2009; 361(7):725; author reply 725. · 51.66 Impact Factor
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    Debora Duro, Daniel Kamin
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    ABSTRACT: Short bowel syndrome is at once a surgical, medical, and a disorder, with potential for life-threatening complications as well as eventual independence from artificial nutrition. Navigating through the diagnostic and therapeutic decisions is ideally accomplished by a multidisciplinary team comprised of nutrition, pharmacy, social work, medicine, and surgery. Early identification of patients at risk for long-term PN-dependency is the first step towards avoiding severe complications. Close monitoring of nutritional status, steady and early introduction of enteral nutrition, and aggressive prevention, diagnosis and treatment of infections such as line sepsis, and bacterial overgrowth can significantly improve prognosis. Intestinal transplantation is an emerging treatment that may be considered when intestinal failure is irreversible and children are suffering from serious complications related to TPN administration.
    Colombia Medica 01/2009; · 0.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a malabsorptive state occuring as a result of surgical resection or congenital disease of a significant portion of the small intestine . The amount of resection or remaining bowel generally dictates the degree of malabsorption and consequentely the need for specialized enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition (PN). Intestinal failure in the context of SBS is defined as a dependence on PN to maintain minimal energy and fluid requirement for growth in children. Common causes of SBS in infants and children include necrotizing enterocolitis, midgut volvulus, intestinal atresia, and gastroschisis. Early identification of patients at risk for long-term PN dependency is the first step toward avoiding severe complications. Close monitoring of nutritional status, steady and early introduction of enteral nutrition, and aggressive prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infections such as central venous catheter sepsis and bacterial overgrowth can significantly improve the prognosis. Intestinal transplantation is an emerging treatment that may be considered when intestinal failure is irreversible and children are experiencing serious complications related to TPN administration.
    Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 09/2008; 47 Suppl 1:S33-6. · 2.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this review is to report on the vitamin D status and its relationship with bone health in individuals with gastrointestinal and liver disorders. In addition, recommendations regarding replacement and maintenance of optimal vitamin D stores, as well as the state of knowledge regarding its effect on the disease through its actions on the immune system, will be reviewed. The scientific community has revised upward the serum levels of vitamin D considered optimal, and doses of vitamin D much larger than those currently recommended may be needed to maintain these levels, especially in individuals with gastrointestinal and liver disorders. The relationship between vitamin D and bone health in this population is controversial. The role of vitamin D in the regulation of the immune system continues to be elucidated. Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent among individuals with gastrointestinal and liver disease. Although replacement and supplementation guidelines have not been well defined, practitioners should aim for a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of at least 32 ng/ml. The contribution of vitamin D to the bone health of these individuals and its role in altering disease course through its actions on the immune system remain to be elucidated.
    Current opinion in gastroenterology 04/2008; 24(2):176-83. · 4.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) is a novel surgical therapy for short bowel syndrome and is being used with increasing frequency worldwide. Because no single center is likely to obtain sufficient experience for meaningful analysis, we created the International STEP Data Registry to allow for larger, multicenter patient accrual and followup. This report describes patient characteristics, operative parameters, and early results of STEP in the first 38 patients enrolled in the International STEP Data Registry. After IRB approval, data were entered online through password-protected enrollment and followup forms. Patient and procedural characteristics were analyzed. Pre- and postoperative small bowel length and enteral feeding tolerance were compared with the paired t-test. Between September 1, 2004, and April 30, 2006, 19 centers from 3 countries enrolled 38 patients. Median followup from STEP procedure to analysis was 12.6 months (range 0 to 66.9 months). Indications for STEP were short bowel syndrome (SBS, n=29), bacterial overgrowth (n=6), and neonatal atresia (n=3). Mean small intestine length was substantially increased in all groups (68+/-44 cm versus 115+/-87 cm, p < 0.0001, n=27). Notable complications included intraoperative staple line leak (n=2), bowel obstruction (n=2), and fluid collection or abscess (n=3). Late outcomes included progression to transplantation (n=3) and mortality (n=3). For the short bowel syndrome cohort, enteral tolerance was notably increased from 31%+/-31% to 67%+/-37% of calories (p < 0.01, n=21). STEP has been performed at multiple centers with minimal complications and encouraging outcomes. Indications for the procedure have broadened beyond short bowel syndrome to include bacterial overgrowth and neonatal intestinal obstruction with dilated proximal intestine. Continued accrual and followup of patients in the International STEP Data Registry will elucidate the longterm safety and efficacy of the procedure, with the goal of improved patient selection and operative timing.
    Journal of the American College of Surgeons 03/2007; 204(3):365-71. · 4.50 Impact Factor