Craig Tucker

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, United States

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Publications (14)14.35 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Hydrodynamic imaging using the lateral line plays a critical role in fish behavior. To engineer such a biologically inspired sensing system, we developed an artificial lateral line using MEMS (microelectromechanical system) technology and explored its localization capability. Arrays of biomimetic neuromasts constituted an artificial lateral line wrapped around a cylinder. A beamforming algorithm further enabled the artificial lateral line to image real-world hydrodynamic events in a 3D domain. We demonstrate that the artificial lateral line system can accurately localize an artificial dipole source and a natural tail-flicking crayfish under various conditions. The artificial lateral line provides a new sense to man-made underwater vehicles and marine robots so that they can sense like fish.
    Bioinspiration &amp Biomimetics 03/2010; 5(1):16001. · 2.41 Impact Factor
  • Proceedings of the First International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices, BIOSIGNALS 2008, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, January 28-31, 2008, Volume 2; 01/2008
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    ABSTRACT: We report the development of an artificial hair cell (AHC) sensor with design inspired by biological hair cells. The sensor consists of a silicon cantilever beam with a high-aspect-ratio cilium attached at the distal end. Sensing is based on silicon piezoresistive strain gauge at the base of the cantilever. The cilium is made of photodefinable SU-8 epoxy and can be up to 700-mum tall. In this paper, we focus on flow-sensing applications. We have characterized the performance of the AHC sensor both in water and in air. For underwater applications, we have characterized the sensor under two flow conditions: steady-state laminar flow (dc flow) and oscillatory flow (ac flow). The detection limit of the sensor under ac flow in water is experimentally established to be below 1 mm/s. A best case angular resolution of 2.16deg is also achieved for the sensor's yaw response in air.
    Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 11/2007; · 2.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the development and application of an artificial hair cell (AHC) flow sensor inspired by biological systems. With optimized design and fabrication process, the AHC is characterized in terms of sensitivity, calibration, and robustness. Especially, an AHC can discern variations of water flow down to 0.1mm/s and survive 55o deflections. The sensor has been applied to flow field measurements, matching perfectly with analytical and previous experimental results. By employing arrays of such AHC sensors, an artificial lateral line is constructed for biomimetic studies on localizing and tracking hydrodynamic events.
    Proc SPIE 03/2007;
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    ABSTRACT: We report the development and application of an artificial hair cell (AHC) flow sensor inspired by biological systems. With optimized design and fabrication process, the AHC is characterized in terms of sensitivity, calibration, and robustness. Especially, an AHC can discern variations of water flow down to 0.1 mm/s and survive 55deg deflections. The sensor has been applied to flow field measurements, matching perfectly with analytical and previous experimental results. By employing arrays of such AHC sensors, an artificial lateral line is constructed for biomimetic studies on localizing and tracking hydrodynamic events.
    Micro Electro Mechanical Systems, 2007. MEMS. IEEE 20th International Conference on; 02/2007
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    Advanced Materials - ADVAN MATER. 01/2007; 19(19):2903-2909.
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    ABSTRACT: Nearly all underwater vehicles and surface ships today use sonar and vision for imaging and navigation. However, sonar and vision systems face various limitations, e.g., sonar blind zones, dark or murky environments, etc. Evolved over millions of years, fish use the lateral line, a distributed linear array of flow sensing organs, for underwater hydrodynamic imaging and information extraction. We demonstrate here a proof-of-concept artificial lateral line system. It enables a distant touch hydrodynamic imaging capability to critically augment sonar and vision systems. We show that the artificial lateral line can successfully perform dipole source localization and hydrodynamic wake detection. The development of the artificial lateral line is aimed at fundamentally enhancing human ability to detect, navigate, and survive in the underwater environment.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 01/2007; 103(50):18891-5. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: By mimicking fish lateral lines and fish sensing behaviors, we constructed an artificial lateral line and employed it for biomimetic flow sensing. Thirteen hot-film anemometers were mounted to the surface of a NACA0015 airfoil to constitute the artificial lateral line. The resulting fish-like platform was maneuvered by a 3-degree-of-freedom robotic arm for two-dimensional mobility in aquatic environments. Assisted with specially developed algorithms, two biologically relevant flow-sensing scenarios have been realized. They were tracking a nearby dipole source in still water by detecting the dipole flow field and tracking a distant stationary source in running water by detecting its hydrodynamic wake.
    ASME 2007 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: Artificial haircell (AHC) sensor is presented for highly sensitive flow-field measurements. Design considerations and MEMS process flows are given. Oscillating flow field measurements show sensitivity down to 0.6 mm/s flow rates, steady state flow fields detected down to 0.1 mm/s.
    Sensors, 2006. 5th IEEE Conference on; 11/2006
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    ABSTRACT: This work presents results towards realizing a flexible multimodal tactile sensing system for object identification. Using polymer substrates and simple fabrication, robust devices are made that can identify objects based on texture, temperature, as well as material properties such as hardness and thermal conductivity. These capabilities are possible using signal processing techniques and physical models along with individual sensing structures inspired by the specialization found in biological skin. These structures are used to sense various object parameters, and array-wide processing to identify texture using a Maximum Likelihood decision rule. 80% texture classification is achieved. In blind object identification tests, over 90% correct identification was achieved by measurement of material properties.
    Sensors, 2006. 5th IEEE Conference on; 11/2006
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    ABSTRACT: We report on the development of new elastomers and processes that utilize polymers such as PDMS, FSR (force sensitive resistor) polymer, MWCNT, and polyurethane to realize bioinspired sensors such as artificial haircells. In nature, haircell sensors are used by fish to sense flow, by spiders to sense vibration, and by some vertebrates for hearing and acoustics. An artificial haircell sensor is designed to mimic the ability of natural haircells to sense flow, vibration, and touch. However, in order to improve the sensitivity and robustness, the use of polymers is necessary. In this paper, we present the different generations of bioinspired artificial haircell sensors, along with the polymers and processes needed for their construction
    Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems, 2006. NEMS '06. 1st IEEE International Conference on; 02/2006
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    ABSTRACT: We report characterization and application of recently developed, MEMS based, out-of-plane hot-wire anemometer (HWA) sensor and bio-inspired artificial hair cell (AHC) sensor. Sensitivities of 0.2mm/s for HWA and 0.1mm/s for AHC have been achieved in water flows, comparing with 1mm/s of a conventional HWA. In contrast to its high sensitivity, the AHC sensor can survive 55 bending of its hair, making it very robust. After calibration, both HWA and AHC sensors were employed for dipole field and wake measurements. The dipole field was generated by a vibrating sphere in a large water tank; the measurement results match very well with the analytical model. The wake was created by a circular cylinder in a water channel; the RMS velocity distributions replicate the main features of a typical wake accurately. The two types of sensors were also applied in array format to mimic a fish lateral line for imaging hydrodynamic events. Multi-modal sensors capable of simultaneous measurement of flow velocity, shear stress, pressure and temperature are under development.
    01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) elastomer is widely used in MEMS. However, PDMS is non-conductive and as a result is used in mostly structural applications. We report methods for monolithic integration of conductive and non-conductive PDMS for realizing wholly polymer-based devices with embedded elastomer wires, electrodes, heaters, and sensors. In this work we demonstrate elastomer strain gauges, capacitive pressure sensors, as well as microfluidic channels with integrated heaters and sensors. The process uses a series of PDMS patterning, micromolding, and bonding techniques with conductive PDMS features made by mixing with multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT).
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    ABSTRACT: We report the development of a high sensitivity artificial haircell (AHC) sensor that employs high aspect-ratio cilium (up to 700μm tall) made of SU-8 epoxy and silicon piezoresistive strain sensors. In this work, we demonstrate the application of the artificial haircell for underwater flow sensing. For device characterization, we have performed deflection testing, resonant frequency testing, sensitivity threshold testing and preliminary dipole field response experiments. We have demonstrated a flow rate sensitivity of 2mm/s.