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Publications (2)4.99 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: It has been previously shown that integrating radiology teaching into the first year of medical education has an immediate positive effect on medical students' attitudes toward the practice of radiology. The purpose of this study is to determine whether these changes in attitude persist through the clinical years of training and whether preclinical exposure to radiology has a long-term effect on medical students' opinions about radiology and radiologists. The first-year medical curriculum at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine was revised between the 2003 and 2004 academic years, with 2.5 hours of additional radiology lectures integrated into the existing preclinical coursework. Additionally, radiology consult sessions were integrated into problem-based learning sessions. An initial survey was administered in the preclinical years of training to assess first-year medical students' attitudes toward radiology before and after the changes to the curriculum. A follow-up survey was administered before graduation to determine whether the changes in attitude revealed in the first survey persisted throughout the remaining years of training, and to assess students' opinions about negative radiologist stereotypes. Students who had undergone the revised curriculum were compared to students who had undergone the traditional curriculum. There were statistically significant differences between the two graduating classes in terms of interest in, and perceptions of, the field of radiology. At graduation, students exposed to the revised preclinical curriculum with a greater exposure to radiology had a greater interest in radiology as a discipline and were more likely to have taken senior electives in radiology. These graduating students were also less likely to agree with negative stereotypes about radiologists. Dedicated medical student teaching from an academic radiologist during the first year of medical school has a positive, long-lasting effect on medical students' attitudes toward radiology. The prevalence of negative stereotypes about radiologists among graduating medical students can be reduced by appropriate teaching of radiology in the preclinical years of medical school.
    Academic radiology 11/2008; 15(10):1331-9. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine whether an integrated radiology curriculum in the first year of medical school changes medical students' attitudes toward radiology or affects their knowledge of radiologic principles. The first-year medical curriculum of a medical school was revised between the 2003 and 2004 academic years to introduce more didactic radiology teaching. Dedicated radiology lectures were introduced, and radiology consult sessions became integral to problem-based learning sessions. A survey was administered between the first and second years of training to assess first-year medical students' attitudes toward radiology and their knowledge of basic radiologic principles. Students who had undertaken the revised curriculum (class of 2008) were compared with students who had undertaken the traditional curriculum (class of 2007). Survey responses were compared with Mann-Whitney rank sum tests. Students exposed to the new curriculum stated that they were more familiar with radiology as a specialty and believed that radiology had greater importance to the overall practice of medicine. They stated that they were more likely to select radiology as a clinical elective, and more of them were considering radiology as a career option. The students who had been exposed to radiology performed better on the test of basic radiologic knowledge. All results were statistically significant. Exposing students to radiology in the first year of medical school improves their impression of radiology as a specialty and increases their interest in radiology as a career. Follow-up surveys will determine whether this effect persists through the clinical years of training and improves the overall impression of radiology within the medical community.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 02/2007; 188(1):W9-14. · 2.90 Impact Factor