Mayumi Nakayama

Tohoku University, Sendai, Kagoshima, Japan

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Publications (2)9.17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Seedling roots display not only gravitropism but also hydrotropism, and the two tropisms interfere with one another. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots, amyloplasts in columella cells are rapidly degraded during the hydrotropic response. Degradation of amyloplasts involved in gravisensing enhances the hydrotropic response by reducing the gravitropic response. However, the mechanism by which amyloplasts are degraded in hydrotropically responding roots remains unknown. In this study, the mechanistic aspects of the degradation of amyloplasts in columella cells during hydrotropic response were investigated by analyzing organellar morphology, cell polarity and changes in gene expression. The results showed that hydrotropic stimulation or systemic water stress caused dramatic changes in organellar form and positioning in columella cells. Specifically, the columella cells of hydrotropically responding or water-stressed roots lost polarity in the distribution of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and showed accelerated vacuolization and nuclear movement. Analysis of ER-localized GFP showed that ER redistributed around the developed vacuoles. Cells often showed decomposing amyloplasts in autophagosome-like structures. Both hydrotropic stimulation and water stress upregulated the expression of AtATG18a, which is required for autophagosome formation. Furthermore, analysis with GFP-AtATG8a revealed that both hydrotropic stimulation and water stress induced the formation of autophagosomes in the columella cells. In addition, expression of plastid marker, pt-GFP, in the columella cells dramatically decreased in response to both hydrotropic stimulation and water stress, but its decrease was much less in the autophagy mutant atg5. These results suggest that hydrotropic stimulation confers water stress in the roots, which triggers an autophagic response responsible for the degradation of amyloplasts in columella cells of Arabidopsis roots.
    Planta 04/2012; 236(4):999-1012. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plants are sessile in nature, and need to detect and respond to many environmental cues in order to regulate their growth and orientation. Indeed, plants sense numerous environmental cues and respond via appropriate tropisms, and it is widely accepted that auxin plays an important role in these responses. Recent analyses using Arabidopsis have emphasized the importance of polar auxin transport and differential auxin responses to gravitropism. Even so, the involvement of auxin in hydrotropism remains unclear. To clarify whether or not auxin is involved in the hydrotropic response, Arabidopsis seedlings were treated with inhibitors of auxin influx (3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid), efflux (1-naphthylphthalemic acid and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid), and response (p-chlorophenoxyisobutylacetic acid), and their effects were examined on both hydrotropic and gravitropic responses. In agreement with previous reports, gravitropism was inhibited by all the chemicals tested. By contrast, only an inhibitor of the auxin response (p-chlorophenoxyisobutylacetic acid) reduced hydrotropism, whereas inhibitors for influx or efflux of auxin had no effect. These results suggest that auxin response, apart from its polar transport, plays a definite role in hydrotropic response, and will evoke a new concept for the auxin-mediated regulation of tropisms.
    Journal of Experimental Botany 02/2007; 58(5):1143-50. · 5.79 Impact Factor