Daniela Mattei

Catholic University of the Sacred Heart , Roma, Latium, Italy

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Publications (24)33.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study analyzed the carapace distribution of Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sb, U, V and Zn by GF-AAS and ICP-AES in one specimen of Caretta caretta from Mediterranean Sea. Calcium, Mg, Mn, Pb, U, Zn were mainly distributed in the central area while Cd, Cr, Cu, Sb, V in lateral areas. Cadmium, Cr, Mg, Mn, Sb, U and V were different between lateral areas. The different distribution may be related to several exposures during lifetime and/or the shell ossification during growth. Carapace may be a suitable matrix for metal biomonitoring, however, further studies are required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Marine Pollution Bulletin 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2015.06.001 · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Iridium tissue distribution and excretion in female Wistar rats following oral exposure to iridium (III) chloride hydrate in drinking water (from 1 to 1000 ng/ml) in a sub-chronic oral study were determined. Samples of urine, feces, blood and organs (kidneys, liver, lung, spleen and brain) were collected at the end of exposure. The most prominent fractions of iridium were retained in kidney and spleen; smaller amounts were found in lungs, liver and brain. Iridium brain levels were lower than those observed in other tissues but this finding can support the hypothesis of iridium capability to cross the blood brain barrier. The iridium kidney levels rose significantly with the administered dose. At the highest dose, important amounts of the metal were found in serum, urine and feces. Iridium was predominantly excreted via feces with a significant linear correlation with the ingested dose, which is likely due to low intestinal absorption of the metal. However, at the higher doses iridium was also eliminated through urine. These findings may be useful to help in the understanding of the adverse health effects, particularly on the immune system, of iridium dispersed in the environment as well as in identifying appropriate biological indices of iridium exposure.
    Dose-Response 01/2012; 10(3):405-14. DOI:10.2203/dose-response.11-052.Iavicoli · 1.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the last years Ostreopsis spp. blooms have been reported in several Italian coastal stretches, showing a clear trend towards their extension. In 2005, during summer, an O. ovata bloom occurring in the coastal area in front of Genoa was tentatively associated with some human effects. Symptoms like rhinorrea, cough, fever, conjunctivitis, bronchoconstriction with mild dyspnea, and wheezes were observed in people exposed to marine aerosols, possibly containing algal fragments and/or its toxin. With less severe symptoms, similar episodes have been sporadically recorded in other coastal areas. Up to these events, the institutional monitoring activities were focused only on the surveillance of planktonic microalgae whereas benthonic ones, such as Ostreopsis spp. were ignored. To fill this gap, in 2006 a group of experts was appointed by the Italian Ministry of Health with the task to elaborate specific guidelines to manage the possible riskassociated to Ostreopsis spp. blooms. After their formal endorsement, the guidelines were published in the official site of the Ministry and implemented by local structures. The guidelines identify surveillance activities to be carried out, subdividing them into the routine, alert and alarm phases. These guidelines are currently under revision in order to update the scientific background and refine the approach on the basis of the two-year application experience.
    Journal of Coastal Research 12/2011; DOI:10.2307/41510832 · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The global spread of contaminants, like chemical elements, in marine environment may pose loggerhead turtles Caretta caretta at risk. Sea turtles are migratory and carnivorous, therefore, food can be the main source of exposure to these chemicals. Differences in diet habits could explain the high internal dose of elements exhibit by loggerhead turtles. Liver, muscle and kidney of Caretta caretta have been largely investigated by different authors for the elevated levels of elements accumulated. Pancreas, heart, spleen, bones, adipose tissue, eggs were also considered, but it is difficult to comprehend the significance of data, because of the lack of knowledge on the baseline levels. Carapace is the least analyzed even if a considerable amount of some elements is accumulated in this hard tissue. This study proposes the analysis of As, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sb, U, V and Zn in one carapace of a stranded individual from Mediterranean Sea (Sicily, Italy) provided by the Filicudi WildLife Conservation center as an attempt for mapping elements distribution.
    4th Mediterranean Conference on Marine Turtles, Napoli; 11/2011
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    ABSTRACT: As a part of the activities of the first Italian human biomonitoring survey (PROBE - PROgramme for Biomonitoring general population Exposure), a reference population of adolescents, aged 13-15 years, was examined for their exposure to metals. The study included 252 adolescents living in urban areas, representative of Latium Region (Italy) and blood specimens were analyzed for metals (As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Ir, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Pd, Pt, Rh, Sb, Sn, Tl, U, V and W) by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results obtained will improve the knowledge about the body burden in adolescents and are tentative reference values for Italian young people as a basis for risk evaluation deriving from urban/environmental exposure to metals.
    International journal of hygiene and environmental health 10/2011; 215(2):185-90. DOI:10.1016/j.ijheh.2011.07.015 · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chemical elements and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are globally present in aquatic systems and their potential transfer to loggerhead marine turtles (Caretta caretta) has become a serious threat for their health status. The environmental fate of these xenobiotics may be traced by the analysis of turtles' tissues and blood. Generally, loggerhead turtles exhibited a higher metal load than other turtle species, this could be explained by differences in diet habits being food the main source of exposure. Literature shows that muscle, liver and kidney are most considered for the quantification of chemical elements, while, organic compounds are typically investigated in liver and fat. This paper is an overview of the international studies carried out on the quantification of chemical elements, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorines (OCs) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), in tissues, organs and fluids of C. caretta from the Mediterranean Sea, the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans.
    Marine Pollution Bulletin 06/2011; 62(8):1606-15. DOI:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2011.05.022 · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This protocol was developed to estimate the uncertainty of measurements in the sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of As, Co, Cr, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sn and V in human serum by utilizing in-house validation data. The approach is outlined in the Eurachem/Citac Guide and other relevant publications. The results generated were the followings: (i) coefficients of regression >0.9995 over two orders of magnitude of metal concentration; (ii) method quantification limits between 0.05 µg/L (Cr, Mn) and 0.49 µg/L (As); (iii) mean trueness checked against a certified reference material between 95.4% (As) and 107.7% (Ni); (iv) repeatability better than 10.2% over the range 0.1-2.0 µg/L; (v) reproducibility better than 12.0% over the range 0.1-2.0 µg/L; and (vi) expanded uncertainty budget comprised between 14.7% (Mn) and 27.9% (Cr) over the range 0.1-2.0 µg/L.
    Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 02/2011; 25(3):453-8. DOI:10.1002/rcm.4852 · 2.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A protocol that utilises data (trueness/recovery, precision and robustness) from validation tests to calculate measurement uncertainty was described and applied to a sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS)-based method for the determination of Be, Cd, Hg, Ir, Pb, Pd, Pt, Rh, Sb, U, Tl and W in human serum. The method was validated according to criteria issued by international bodies such as AOAC, Eurachem and ISO and the uncertainty in the analytical measurements was estimated following the Eurachem/Citac guide. The methodology was based on dilution of human serum with water and analysis by serum-matched standard calibration. The method quantification limits ranged 0.02 microg/L (Tl, Ir) to 0.26 microg/L (Hg). The coefficients of regression were greater than 0.9991 over a range of two orders of magnitude of concentration. The mean trueness was 101% and the mean recovery on three levels of fortification (1-, 1.5-, and 2-times the baseline serum level) ranged between 93.3% and 106%. The maximum relative standard deviation values for repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility were 12.8% and 13.5%. The method was robust to slight variations of some critical factors relevant to the sample preparation and SF-ICP-MS instrumentation. The relative expanded uncertainty over three levels of concentration ranged from 11.6% (Hg) to 27.6% (Pt), and the uncertainty on the within-laboratory reproducibility, which included factors such as time, analyst and calibration, represented the main contribution to the overall uncertainty.
    Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 08/2010; 24(16):2363-9. DOI:10.1002/rcm.4650 · 2.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Italian program for human biomonitoring (HBM) of chemical elements, PROgram for Biomonitoring of the Exposure (PROBE), started in 2008 with the aim to provide the knowledge about risk assessment of the Italian population following the environmental exposure to metals. The project is implemented through a HBM campaign for the production of data on 19 metals in the blood and serum of subjects living in different Italian Regions. The metals studied are: antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, iridium, lead, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, palladium, platinum, rhodium, thallium, tin, tungsten, uranium and vanadium. The first phase of the project has included the development and validation of laboratory protocols for the collection of fluids and quantification of metals. The second phase provides the HBM data expressed as the reference values (RVs) for the Italian population, i.e., as the level of metals in the general population not occupationally exposed. In this paper, the experimental protocols used for the maintenance of high standards of analysis and the RVs for metals in serum of inhabitants of two Italian Regions (Calabria and Umbria) are described.
    Annali dell'Istituto superiore di sanita 01/2010; 46(3):259-65. DOI:10.4415/ANN_10_03_06 · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing concern for human health related to cyanotoxin exposure imposes the identification of pattern and level of exposure; however, current monitoring programs, based on cyanobacteria cell counts, could be inadequate. An integrated approach has been applied to a small lake in Italy, affected by Planktothrix rubescens blooms, to provide a scientific basis for appropriate monitoring program design. The cyanobacterium dynamic, the lake physicochemical and trophic status, expressed as nutrients concentration and recycling rates due to bacterial activity, the identification/quantification of toxic genotype and cyanotoxin concentration have been studied. Our results indicate that low levels of nutrients are not a marker for low risk of P. rubescens proliferation and confirm that cyanobacterial density solely is not a reliable parameter to assess human exposure. The ratio between toxic/non-toxic cells, and toxin concentrations, which can be better explained by toxic population dynamic, are much more diagnostic, although varying with time and environmental conditions. The toxic fraction within P. rubescens population is generally high (30-100%) and increases with water depth. The ratio toxic/non-toxic cells is lowest during the bloom, suggesting a competitive advantage for non-toxic cells. Therefore, when P. rubescens is the dominant species, it is important to analyze samples below the thermocline, and quantitatively estimate toxic genotype abundance. In addition, the identification of cyanotoxin content and congeners profile, with different toxic potential, are crucial for risk assessment.
    Water Research 11/2009; 44(5):1297-306. DOI:10.1016/j.watres.2009.10.045 · 5.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was devoted to the quantification of 21 metals (Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, V and Zn) in the colorectal tissue of 52 healthy subjects, 31 patients with polyps and 21 post-operated patients, and in blood, serum and urine of all subjects. Tissues of healthy subjects had a content of metals similar to those of post-operated patients and to normal tissues adjacent to the polyp. The polyps had concentrations of Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Sr and V significantly lower and of Fe and Se significantly higher respect to normal tissues. Polypotic patients had higher serum Cr, Cu and Pb and lower urinary Mo levels than healthy subjects, whereas blood showed no difference. Results highlighted metal-specific differences both at tissue and systemic level probably caused by the early stage of colorectal cancer.
    International Journal of Environment and Health 01/2009; 3(2). DOI:10.1504/IJENVH.2009.024880
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    ABSTRACT: Data on metals involvement in colorectal polyps are scarce and fragmentary. The aim of this study was to examine whether the level of metals could be associated with risk of colorectal polyp development. The concentration of 15 chemical elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg Mg, Mn, Pb, Se, Sr, and Zn) in 17 colorectal biopsies of healthy individuals, in 15 polypotic and corresponding nonpolypotic biopsies taken from the same individual, was evaluated. Concentration in polyps of metals such as Al, Ca, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sr, and Zn was unchanged both in unpaired and paired samples; elements such as Ba, Cd, and Hg were significantly lower and Fe was significantly higher both in individual and paired tissues. Cobalt, Cr, and Cu were significantly different only between polyps and the adjacent normal tissue area; Se showed a significant accumulation comparing polyps versus healthy tissues. The difference found in some elements between polyps and a control tissue provides an indication about the role of essential and nonessential elements in the early stage (polyps) in the colon carcinogenic process and encourages further studies to confirm the involvement of such elements in neoplastic processes.
    Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Part A 02/2008; 71(5):342-7. DOI:10.1080/15287390701839133 · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A simple and convenient method for the digestion of animal tissues, lichens, and plants for 33 metals measured by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) was described. Microwave-assisted acid digestions were performed at atmospheric pressure by means of a multi-samples rotor designed for processing a large number of samples at once in screw-capped disposable polystyrene liners. The digested samples were filled up to final volume directly in the polystyrene liners ready for elemental quantification. Seven certified reference materials, namely BCR 184 (bovine muscle), BCR 186 (pig kidney), DORM-2 (dogfish muscle), BCR 422 (cod muscle), BCR 62 (olive leaves), BCR 100 (beech leaves), and BCR 482 (lichen) were analysed to verify the accuracy of the method. The linearity range, limit of quantification, precision, and recovery by addition of non-certified elements were also assessed. All elements, with the exception of Hg in BCR 184 and As in BCR 186, were above the quantification limit and blank concentrations, and good agreement existed between found and target values in bovine muscle, pig kidney, and cod muscle. Significant deviations were observed for Al, Co, Cr, Mn, and Ni in dogfish muscle and for Ca, Cr, Fe, and Hg in lichens and plants. The proposed digestion procedure offers a low contamination risk, simplicity, speed, low cost, and applicability in routine analysis, and the SF-ICP-MS method allowed metals from a fraction of ng g to hundreds of µg g to be quantified in one analytical run.
    International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry 12/2007; 87(15):1111-1123. DOI:10.1080/03067310701485416 · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An analytical procedure applicable to restricted sample sizes was developed and applied to the analysis of 30 chemical elements in colorectal biopsies of healthy patients. Acidic microwave digestion processed </=10 mg of tissue at 80 degrees C in 15-mL polystyrene liners. The digests were diluted to a volume of 2 mL with high-purity water and directly analyzed by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry without further specimen handling. A careful selection of isotopes and instrumental resolution permitted the quantification in a single analytical sequence both of the elements present at parts per trillion and of those at parts per million. The accuracy calculated on BCR 184 ranged from 93.3-110%, the recoveries of the biopsy material was in the range 95.2-105%, the precision was <10%, and the blank levels were much below those expected in biopsy samples. The metal concentrations (on a dry-weight basis) in colorectal normal tissue showed a large range of variation: Ag, Au, Be, Bi, Co, Li, Sb, Tl, V, W and Zr were below 50 ng g(-1); As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cs, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se and Sn were distributed from 100 to 500 ng g(-1); Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Sr and Zn were from a few microg g(-1) to 100 microg g(-1); and Ca and Mg were at a level of 1000 microg g(-1). These data represent the first attempt to achieve an elemental profile in the colorectal mucosa of healthy patients as baseline level measurements for studies focused on the imbalance of chemical elements in diseased mucosa.
    Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 06/2007; 21(11):1776-82. DOI:10.1002/rcm.3016 · 2.64 Impact Factor
  • Daniela Mattei, Giuseppe Salvatore, Milena Bruno
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    ABSTRACT: The general increase in eutrophication of waters and the changes in global climatic conditions have caused over the last 30 years the spread of algal blooms in seas all over the world. The paper describes the different aspects of this problem, the known classes of marine algal toxins and their effects on human activities, and the problem of ballast waters. New strategies of remote sensing control, informative medical net projects and methods of managing and avoiding the related health consequences are also discussed.
    International Journal of Environment and Health 01/2007; 1(3). DOI:10.1504/IJENVH.2007.017872
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    ABSTRACT: The evaluation of Tiber River quality, in a stretch including a sewage treatment plant, has been carried out by the contemporary evaluation of water effect on Daphnia and benthic macroinvertebrates community structure. To achieve a good status of a river water by the end of 2015, as provided in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) 2000/60/EC, is necessary to know the quality starting point. To this end, several endpoints are expected by the WFD, including Daphnia toxicity test and macroinvertebrate community analysis.River water sampling was conducted in the four seasons, from upstream to downstream a sewage treatment plant. I endpoint. At the outfall of the sewage treatment plant, river water showed very high acute toxicity to Daphnia only in summer; some toxic effect can be found also upstream in spring. Results at the outfall were consistent with the hypothesis that disinfectants, mainly used in summer to treat discharging waters, are responsible of river water acute toxicity: Daphnia tests with each disinfectant (NaClO, PAA, ClO2) showed high toxicity.River waters were also utilized in Daphnia reproduction tests. Samples at the outfall (excluding the summer one, undoubtedly toxic) caused slight reduction in survival and fecundity. Disinfectants were also checked in reproduction tests. Still at NOEC24h, they caused a significant toxicity on both death rate and reproduction. II endpoint. Macroinvertebrate benthic community composition was evaluated upstream and downstream the sewage treatment plant, on these data Extended Biotic Index (EBI), was determined to get a score as quality class. A reduction of water quality score was found downstream the plant, one season delayed (autumn) respect the acute test on Daphnia.Effect of disinfectant discharge, river dilution capability on a short spatial scale and use of different endpoints are discussed in term of river stretch quality.
    Water Air and Soil Pollution 10/2006; 177(1):441-455. DOI:10.1007/s11270-006-9183-1 · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens Anagnostidis & Komarek (previously Oscillatoria rubescens DC ex Gomont) is present in several Italian lakes and it is known to produce cyanotoxins. The dynamics and toxin production of P. rubescens population in Lake Albano, a volcanic crater lake in Central Italy, has been studied for 5 years (January 2001-April 2005). Winter-spring superficial blooms with frequent scums were observed every year. Total microcystin (MC) levels were measured from April 2004 to October 2005 by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. MC levels up to 14.2mug/l were measured, with high concentrations found in summer at a 20-25m depth. The intracellular toxin content varied between 1.5 (surface, January 2004) and 0.21pg/cell (surface, May 2004). Six different MCs were detected, the most abundant being two desmethyl-MC-RR isomers. Of the 13 water wells monitored in the Lake Albano area, two of them showed MC contamination during winter, confirming the ability of these toxins to migrate through groundwater towards public water sources. These results highlight the need for further studies on the mobility and fate of these pervasive cyanobacterial toxins.
    Toxicon 09/2006; 48(2):160-74. DOI:10.1016/j.toxicon.2006.04.006 · 2.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of natural products as a diet supplement is increasing worldwide but sometimes is not followed by adequate sanitary controls and analyses. Twenty samples of pills and capsules of lyophilised cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), commercialised in Italy as dietary supplements, were found positive at the Vibrio fischeri bioassay. Further analyses with ELISA and LC-MS/MS methods revealed the presence of four microcystin (MC) analogues, MC-LR, -YR, -LA, -RR and two demethylated forms of MC-RR. The highest total microcystin content was 4.5 and 1.4 microg g-1 in pills and capsules, respectively. The ELISA measurements, compared to the LC-MS/MS analyses, showed significantly lower concentrations of microcystins in pills, this confirming a possible ELISA underestimate of mixed microcystins, due to different sensitivities for some toxic analogues.
    Natural Product Research 08/2006; 20(9):827-34. DOI:10.1080/14786410500410859 · 1.23 Impact Factor
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Publication Stats

128 Citations
33.52 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Catholic University of the Sacred Heart
      • Institute of Occupational Medicine
      Roma, Latium, Italy
  • 2011
    • Istituto Regina Elena - Istituti Fisioterapici Ospitalieri
      Roma, Latium, Italy
  • 2006–2010
    • Istituto Superiore di Sanità
      • Department of Environment and Primary Prevention
      Roma, Latium, Italy