Mary K Fagan

University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, United States

Are you Mary K Fagan?

Claim your profile

Publications (11)16.07 Total impact

  • Mary K Fagan
    Cochlear implants international 05/2011; 12 Suppl 1:S96-7.
  • Source
    Mary K Fagan, David B Pisoni
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigated receptive vocabulary delay in deaf children with cochlear implants. Participants were 23 children with profound hearing loss, ages 6-14 years, who received a cochlear implant between ages 1.4 and 6 years. Duration of cochlear implant use ranged from 3.7 to 11.8 years. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third Edition (PPVT-III) data were analyzed first by examining children's errors for evidence of difficulty in specific lexical content areas, and second by calculating standard scores with reference to hearing age (HA) (i.e., chronological age [CA]--age at implantation) rather than CA. Participants showed evidence of vocabulary understanding across all PPVT-III content categories with no strong evidence of disproportionate numbers of errors in any specific content area despite below-average mean standard scores. However, whereas mean standard scores were below the test mean established for hearing children when based on CA, they were within the average range for hearing children when calculated based on HA. Thus, children's vocabulary knowledge was commensurate with years of cochlear implant experience, providing support for the role of spoken language experience in vocabulary acquisition.
    Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education 01/2010; 15(2):149-61. · 1.02 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Mary K Fagan, David B Pisoni
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Infants learn about their environment through sensory exploration, acquiring knowledge that is important for cognitive development. However, little is known about the sensory exploration of infants with profound hearing loss before or after they receive cochlear implants. This paper reviews aspects of sensory perception and cognitive development in hearing infants, discusses the implications of delayed access to auditory information for multisensory perception and cognitive development in infants who use cochlear implants, and suggests several new directions for research addressing multisensory exploration and cognitive development in infants with cochlear implants.
    Scandinavian Journal of Psychology 10/2009; 50(5):457-62. · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • Mary K Fagan
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study measured longitudinal change in six parameters of infant utterances (i.e. number of sounds, CV syllables, supraglottal consonants, and repetitions per utterance, temporal duration, and seconds per sound), investigated previously unexplored characteristics of repetition (i.e. number of vowel and CV syllable repetitions per utterance) and analyzed change in vocalizations in relation to age and developmental milestones using multilevel models. Infants (N=18) were videotaped bimonthly during naturalistic and semi-structured activities between 0 ; 3 and the onset of word use (M=11.8 months). Results showed that infant utterances changed in predictable ways both in relation to age and in relation to language milestones (i.e. reduplicated babble onset, word comprehension and word production). Looking at change in relation to the milestones of language development led to new views of babbling, the transition from babbling to first words, and processes that may underlie these transitions.
    Journal of Child Language 11/2008; 36(3):495-527. · 1.41 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Mary K Fagan, Thomas R Montgomery
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigates relations between language and cognitive scores in children with receptive language (RL) delay and suggests guidelines for referral for cognitive testing. This retrospective review of the test scores of 41 children, ages 17 to 76 months (mean = 37.7 months), focuses on examining associations between RL and cognitive scores. Results show that mean RL scores are positively correlated with mean cognitive scores and that receptive scores are significant predictors of cognitive performance. Children with RL scores of >1 standard deviation below the mean are at risk for concomitant cognitive deficits. Because children with RL delay are at considerable risk for cognitive deficits, the authors recommend considering referral for cognitive testing when RL standard scores fall below 85.
    Clinical Pediatrics 09/2008; 48(1):72-80. · 1.27 Impact Factor
  • Mary K Fagan
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Critical aspects of spoken language depend on perceiving and understanding speech sounds. For deaf infants, however, neither sound perception nor awareness of the sound-making consequences of their actions is available. The goal of this study was to uncover and document early, measurable effects of hearing loss on infant vocalization and changes in these behaviors following cochlear implantation. Participants were 8 deaf infants, 7-11 months old, and 8 infants with cochlear-implants, 12-20 months old and 1-6 months post-implantation. Dependent variables include number of vocalizations, mean vocalization duration, and mean frequency before and after cochlear implantation and in relation to reduplicated babble onset and word production. Post-implant changes in vocal behaviors may have clinical implications for decisions regarding age of implantation and auditory habilitation as well as for understanding post-implant variability.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 06/2008; 123(5):3322. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Mary K. Fagan
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Communicative breakdowns were created in response to toddlers' single-word requests by means of two feedback conditions: one involving goal substitution, the other stating explicitly that the speaker was not understood (i.e., `I don't know what you mean'). Participants were 15 children, ages 17—25 months. Children typically abandoned their original requests in response to goal substitution but revised or repeated their requests when confronted with `I don't know what you mean.' Thus, in the early stages of language development, toddlers' response persistence appeared to depend in large part upon motivation for goal attainment.
    First Language 01/2008; 28(1):55-69.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate visual-motor integration (VI) skills of prelingually deaf (PLD) children before and after cochlear implantation (CI) and investigate correlations with spoken-language and related processing measures. Study 1 was a longitudinal study in which VI was tested preimplant. Study 2 was a cross sectional study of school-age children who used a CI for >2 years. In study 1, a standardized design-copying task was administered preimplant, and spoken-language data were obtained at intervals up to 4 years postimplantation. Analyses were conducted to determine if preimplant VI scores were predictive of various spoken-language measures. In study 2, standardized design copying and speeded maze tracing tasks were administered along with speech perception, vocabulary, and related processing measures. Whereas preimplant VI scores for children in study 1 fell within the typical range based on age-equivalent norms, postimplant VI standard scores in study 2 were low compared to the normative sample. Postimplant VI scores were inversely related to age at implantation. Preimplant VI scores were robustly predictive of most, but not all, spoken-language outcome scores. Postimplant design copying scores were also correlated with spoken-language and related processing measures whereas maze-tracing scores were less robustly related to these measures. Early auditory and linguistic experience may impact the development of VI skills. VI is a preimplant predictor of later spoken language outcomes. Design copying and speeded maze tracing tasks appear to tap different sets of cognitive resources in PLD children with CIs.
    The Laryngoscope 11/2007; 117(11):2017-25. · 1.98 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Mary K Fagan, Jana M Iverson
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although vocalization and mouthing are behaviors frequently performed by infants, little is known about the characteristics of vocalizations that occur with objects, hands, or fingers in infants' mouths. The purpose of this research was to investigate characteristics of vocalizations associated with mouthing in 6- to 9-month-old infants during play with a primary caregiver. Results suggest that mouthing may influence the phonetic characteristics of vocalizations by introducing vocal tract closure and variation in consonant production.
    Infancy 02/2007; 11(2):191-202. · 1.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The performance of deaf children with cochlear implants was assessed using measures standardized on hearing children. To investigate nonverbal cognitive and sensorimotor processes associated with postimplant variability, five selected sensorimotor and visuospatial subtests from A Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment (NEPSY) were compared with standardized vocabulary, reading, and digit span measures. Participants were 26 deaf children, ages 6-14 years, who received a cochlear implant between ages 1 and 6 years; duration of implant use ranged from 3 to 11 years. Results indicated significant correlations between standard scores on the Design Copying subtest of the NEPSY and standard scores on vocabulary comprehension, reading, and digit span measures. The results contribute to our understanding of the benefits of cochlear implantation and cognitive processes that may support postimplant language and academic functioning.
    Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education 02/2007; 12(4):461-71. · 1.02 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Jana M Iverson, Mary K Fagan
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to provide a general picture of infant vocal-motor coordination and test predictions generated by Iverson and Thelen's (1999) model of the development of the gesture-speech system. Forty-seven 6- to 9-month-old infants were videotaped with a primary caregiver during rattle and toy play. Results indicated an age-related increase in frequency of vocal-motor coordination, greater coordination with arm (specifically right arm) than leg or torso movements, and a temporal pattern similar to that in adult gesture-speech coproductions. Rhythmic vocalizations (consonant-vowel repetitions) were more likely to occur with than without rhythmic movement, and with rhythmic manual than with nonmanual activity, and the rate of vocal-manual coordination was higher in babblers than in prebabblers.
    Child Development 01/2004; 75(4):1053-66. · 4.72 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

90 Citations
16.07 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2011
    • University of Missouri
      • • Department of Communication Science and Disorders
      • • Department of Psychological Sciences
      Columbia, MO, United States
  • 2008
    • Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
      Indianapolis, Indiana, United States