Matthew E Hurles

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (183)2670.07 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: DECIPHER (https://decipher.sanger.ac.uk) is a web-based platform for secure deposition, analysis and sharing of plausibly pathogenic genomic variants from well-phenotyped patients suffering from genetic disorders. DECIPHER aids clinical interpretation of these rare sequence and copy-number variants by providing tools for variant analysis and identification of other patients exhibiting similar genotype-phenotype characteristics. DECIPHER also provides mechanisms to encourage collaboration among a global community of clinical centers and researchers, as well as exchange of information between clinicians and researchers within a consortium, to accelerate discovery and diagnosis. DECIPHER has contributed to matchmaking efforts by enabling the global clinical genetics community to identify many previously undiagnosed syndromes and new disease genes, and has facilitated the publication of over 700 peer-reviewed scientific publications since 2004. At the time of writing, DECIPHER contains anonymized data from ∼250 registered centers on more than 51500 patients (∼17,000 patients with consent for data sharing and ∼18,000 anonymized records shared privately). In this paper we describe salient features of the platform, with special emphasis on the tools and processes that aid interpretation, sharing and effective matchmaking with other data held in the database and that make DECIPHER an invaluable clinical and research resource. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Human Mutation 07/2015; DOI:10.1002/humu.22842 · 5.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia, epileptic susceptibility, frontal bossing, mild hypertelorism, and downslanting palpebral fissures. PP2A comprises catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunits that determine subcellular anchoring, substrate specificity, and physiological function. Ten patients had mutations within a highly conserved acidic loop of the PPP2R5D-encoded B56δ regulatory subunit, with the same E198K mutation present in 6 individuals. Five patients had mutations in the PPP2R1A-encoded scaffolding Aα subunit, with the same R182W mutation in 3 individuals. Some Aα cases presented with large ventricles, causing macrocephaly and hydrocephalus suspicion, and all cases exhibited partial or complete corpus callosum agenesis. Functional evaluation revealed that mutant A and B subunits were stable and uncoupled from phosphatase activity. Mutant B56δ was A and C binding-deficient, while mutant Aα subunits bound B56δ well but were unable to bind C or bound a catalytically impaired C, suggesting a dominant-negative effect where mutant subunits hinder dephosphorylation of B56δ-anchored substrates. Moreover, mutant subunit overexpression resulted in hyperphosphorylation of GSK3β, a B56δ-regulated substrate. This effect was in line with clinical observations, supporting a correlation between the ID degree and biochemical disturbance.
    The Journal of clinical investigation 07/2015; DOI:10.1172/JCI79860 · 13.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a novel nephrocerebellar syndrome on the Galloway-Mowat syndrome spectrum among 30 children (ages 1.0 to 28 years) from diverse Amish demes. Children with nephrocerebellar syndrome had progressive microcephaly, visual impairment, stagnant psychomotor development, abnormal extrapyramidal movements and nephrosis. Fourteen died between ages 2.7 and 28 years, typically from renal failure. Post-mortem studies revealed (i) micrencephaly without polymicrogyria or heterotopia; (ii) atrophic cerebellar hemispheres with stunted folia, profound granule cell depletion, Bergmann gliosis, and signs of Purkinje cell deafferentation; (iii) selective striatal cholinergic interneuron loss; and (iv) optic atrophy with delamination of the lateral geniculate nuclei. Renal tissue showed focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and extensive effacement and microvillus transformation of podocyte foot processes. Nephrocerebellar syndrome mapped to 700 kb on chromosome 15, which contained a single novel homozygous frameshift variant (WDR73 c.888delT; p.Phe296Leufs*26). WDR73 protein is expressed in human cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cultured embryonic kidney cells. It is concentrated at mitotic microtubules and interacts with α-, β-, and γ-tubulin, heat shock proteins 70 and 90 (HSP-70; HSP-90), and the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 2/aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase multi-enzyme complex. Recombinant WDR73 p.Phe296Leufs*26 and p.Arg256Profs*18 proteins are truncated, unstable, and show increased interaction with α- and β-tubulin and HSP-70/HSP-90. Fibroblasts from patients homozygous for WDR73 p.Phe296Leufs*26 proliferate poorly in primary culture and senesce early. Our data suggest that in humans, WDR73 interacts with mitotic microtubules to regulate cell cycle progression, proliferation and survival in brain and kidney. We extend the Galloway-Mowat syndrome spectrum with the first description of diencephalic and striatal neuropathology. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Brain 06/2015; DOI:10.1093/brain/awv153 · 10.23 Impact Factor
  • The Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon 06/2015; 63(S 03). DOI:10.1055/s-0035-1556008 · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Investigating genomic structural variants at basepair resolution is crucial for understanding their formation mechanisms. We identify and analyse 8,943 deletion breakpoints in 1,092 samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. We find breakpoints have more nearby SNPs and indels than the genomic average, likely a consequence of relaxed selection. By investigating the correlation of breakpoints with DNA methylation, Hi-C interactions, and histone marks and the substitution patterns of nucleotides near them, we find that breakpoints with the signature of non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) are associated with open chromatin. We hypothesize that some NAHR deletions occur without DNA replication and cell division, in embryonic and germline cells. In contrast, breakpoints associated with non-homologous (NH) mechanisms often have sequence microinsertions, templated from later replicating genomic sites, spaced at two characteristic distances from the breakpoint. These microinsertions are consistent with template-switching events and suggest a particular spatiotemporal configuration for DNA during the events.
    Nature Communications 06/2015; 6:7256. DOI:10.1038/ncomms8256 · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The genetic etiology of atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) is unknown in 40% cases. Conventional sequencing and arrays have identified the etiology in only a minority of nonsyndromic individuals with AVSD. Whole-exome sequencing was performed in 81 unrelated probands with AVSD to identify potentially causal variants in a comprehensive set of 112 genes with strong biological relevance to AVSD. A significant enrichment of rare and rare damaging variants was identified in the gene set, compared with controls (odds ratio (OR): 1.52; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35-1.71; P = 4.8 × 10(-11)). The enrichment was specific to AVSD probands, compared with a cohort without AVSD with tetralogy of Fallot (OR: 2.25; 95% CI: 1.84-2.76; P = 2.2 × 10(-16)). Six genes (NIPBL, CHD7, CEP152, BMPR1a, ZFPM2, and MDM4) were enriched for rare variants in AVSD compared with controls, including three syndrome-associated genes (NIPBL, CHD7, and CEP152). The findings were confirmed in a replication cohort of 81 AVSD probands. Mutations in genes with strong biological relevance to AVSD, including syndrome-associated genes, can contribute to AVSD, even in those with isolated heart disease. The identification of a gene set associated with AVSD will facilitate targeted genetic screening in this cohort.Genet Med advance online publication 21 May 2015Genetics in Medicine (2015); doi:10.1038/gim.2015.60.
    Genetics in medicine: official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics 05/2015; DOI:10.1038/gim.2015.60 · 6.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Health-related results that are discovered in the process of genomic research should only be returned to research participants after being clinically validated and then delivered and followed up within a health service. Returning such results may be difficult for genomic researchers who are limited by resources or unable to access appropriate clinicians. Raw sequence data could, in theory, be returned instead. This might appear nonsensical as, on its own, it is a meaningless code with no clinical value. Yet, as and when direct to consumer genomics services become more widely available (and can be endorsed by independent health professionals and genomic researchers alike), the return of such data could become a realistic proposition. We explore attitudes from <7000 members of the public, genomic researchers, genetic health professionals and non-genetic health professionals and ask participants to suggest what they would do with a raw sequence, if offered it. Results show 62% participants were interested in using it to seek out their own clinical interpretation. Whilst we do not propose that raw sequence data should be returned at the moment, we suggest that should this become feasible in the future, participants of sequencing studies may possibly support this. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 05/2015; DOI:10.1136/jmedgenet-2015-103119 · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have assessed copy number variation (CNV) in the male-specific part of the human Y chromosome discovered by array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) in 411 apparently healthy UK males, and validated the findings using SNP genotype intensity data available for 149 of them. After manual curation taking account of the complex duplicated structure of Y-chromosomal sequences, we discovered 22 curated CNV events considered validated or likely, mean 0.93 (range 0–4) per individual. 16 of these were novel. Curated CNV events ranged in size from <1 kb to >3 Mb, and in frequency from 1/411 to 107/411. Of the 24 protein-coding genes or gene families tested, nine showed CNV. These included a large duplication encompassing the AMELY and TBL1Y genes that probably has no phenotypic effect, partial deletions of the TSPY cluster and AZFc region that may influence spermatogenesis, and other variants with unknown functional implications, including abundant variation in the number of RBMY genes and/or pseudogenes, and a novel complex duplication of two segments overlapping the AZFa region and including the 3′ end of the UTY gene. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00439-015-1562-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
    Human Genetics 05/2015; 134(7). DOI:10.1007/s00439-015-1562-5 · 4.52 Impact Factor
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    Adeolu B Adewoye · Sarah J Lindsay · Yuri E Dubrova · Matthew E Hurles
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to predict the genetic consequences of human exposure to ionizing radiation has been a long-standing goal of human genetics in the past 50 years. Here we present the results of an unbiased, comprehensive genome-wide survey of the range of germline mutations induced in laboratory mice after parental exposure to ionizing radiation and show irradiation markedly alters the frequency and spectrum of de novo mutations. Here we show that the frequency of de novo copy number variants (CNVs) and insertion/deletion events (indels) is significantly elevated in offspring of exposed fathers. We also show that the spectrum of induced de novo single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) is strikingly different; with clustered mutations being significantly over-represented in the offspring of irradiated males. Our study highlights the specific classes of radiation-induced DNA lesions that evade repair and result in germline mutation and paves the way for similarly comprehensive characterizations of other germline mutagens.
    Nature Communications 04/2015; 6(6):6684. DOI:10.1038/ncomms7684 · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the genetic cause of pontocerebellar hypoplasia type III (PCH3). We studied the original reported pedigree of PCH3 and performed genetic analysis including genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. Human fetal brain RNA sequencing data were then analyzed for the identified candidate gene. The affected individuals presented with severe global developmental delay and seizures starting in the first year of life. Brain MRI of an affected individual showed diffuse atrophy of the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analysis confirmed the linkage to chromosome 7q we previously reported, and showed no other genomic areas of linkage. Whole-exome sequencing of 2 affected individuals identified a shared homozygous, nonsense variant in the PCLO (piccolo) gene. This variant segregated with the disease phenotype in the pedigree was rare in the population and was predicted to eliminate the PDZ and C2 domains in the C-terminus of the protein. RNA sequencing data of human fetal brain showed that PCLO was moderately expressed in the developing cerebral cortex. Here, we show that a homozygous, nonsense PCLO mutation underlies the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, PCH3. PCLO is a component of the presynaptic cytoskeletal matrix, and is thought to be involved in regulation of presynaptic proteins and synaptic vesicles. Our findings suggest that PCLO is crucial for the development and survival of a wide range of neuronal types in the human brain. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.
    Neurology 04/2015; 84(17). DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000001523 · 8.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of triplication copy-number variants (CNVs) that were accompanied by extended regions of copy-number-neutral absence of heterozygosity (AOH) in subjects with multiple congenital abnormalities. Molecular analyses provided observational evidence that in humans, post-zygotically generated CGRs can lead to regional uniparental disomy (UPD) due to template switches between homologs versus sister chromatids by using microhomology to prime DNA replication-a prediction of the replicative repair model, MMBIR. Our findings suggest that replication-based mechanisms might underlie the formation of diverse types of genomic alterations (CGRs and AOH) implicated in constitutional disorders. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 03/2015; 96(4). DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.01.021 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Normal thyroid function is essential for health, but its genetic architecture remains poorly understood. Here, for the heritable thyroid traits thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4), we analyse whole-genome sequence data from the UK10K project (N=2,287). Using additional whole-genome sequence and deeply imputed data sets, we report meta-analysis results for common variants (MAF≥1%) associated with TSH and FT4 (N=16,335). For TSH, we identify a novel variant in SYN2 (MAF=23.5%, P=6.15 × 10−9) and a new independent variant in PDE8B (MAF=10.4%, P=5.94 × 10−14). For FT4, we report a low-frequency variant near B4GALT6/SLC25A52 (MAF=3.2%, P=1.27 × 10−9) tagging a rare TTR variant (MAF=0.4%, P=2.14 × 10−11). All common variants explain ≥20% of the variance in TSH and FT4. Analysis of rare variants (MAF<1%) using sequence kernel association testing reveals a novel association with FT4 in NRG1. Our results demonstrate that increased coverage in whole-genome sequence association studies identifies novel variants associated with thyroid function.
    Nature Communications 03/2015; 6. DOI:10.1038/ncomms6681 · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Synaptotagmin-1 (SYT1) is a calcium-binding synaptic vesicle protein that is required for both exocytosis and endocytosis. Here, we describe a human condition associated with a rare variant in SYT1. The individual harboring this variant presented with an early onset dyskinetic movement disorder, severe motor delay, and profound cognitive impairment. Structural MRI was normal, but EEG showed extensive neurophysiological disturbances that included the unusual features of low-frequency oscillatory bursts and enhanced paired-pulse depression of visual evoked potentials. Trio analysis of whole-exome sequence identified a de novo SYT1 missense variant (I368T). Expression of rat SYT1 containing the equivalent human variant in WT mouse primary hippocampal cultures revealed that the mutant form of SYT1 correctly localizes to nerve terminals and is expressed at levels that are approximately equal to levels of endogenous WT protein. The presence of the mutant SYT1 slowed synaptic vesicle fusion kinetics, a finding that agrees with the previously demonstrated role for I368 in calcium-dependent membrane penetration. Expression of the I368T variant also altered the kinetics of synaptic vesicle endocytosis. Together, the clinical features, electrophysiological phenotype, and in vitro neuronal phenotype associated with this dominant negative SYT1 mutation highlight presynaptic mechanisms that mediate human motor control and cognitive development.
    Journal of Clinical Investigation 02/2015; DOI:10.1172/JCI79765 · 13.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Delineating the genetic causes of developmental disorders is an area of active investigation. Mosaic structural abnormalities, defined as copy number or loss of heterozygosity events that are large and present in only a subset of cells, have been detected in 0.2-1.0% of children ascertained for clinical genetic testing. However, the frequency among healthy children in the community is not well characterized, which, if known, could inform better interpretation of the pathogenic burden of this mutational category in children with developmental disorders. In a case-control analysis, we compared the rate of large-scale mosaicism between 1303 children with developmental disorders and 5094 children lacking developmental disorders, using an analytical pipeline we developed, and identified a substantial enrichment in cases (odds ratio = 39.4, P-value 1.073e - 6). A meta-analysis that included frequency estimates among an additional 7000 children with congenital diseases yielded an even stronger statistical enr
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Delineating the genetic causes of developmental disorders is an area of active investigation. Mosaic structural abnormalities, defined as copy number or loss of heterozygosity events that are large and present in only a subset of cells, have been detected in 0.2%-1.0% of children ascertained for clinical genetic testing. However, the frequency among healthy children in the community is not well characterised, which, if known, could inform better interpretation of the pathogenic burden of this mutational category in children with developmental disorders. In a case-control analysis, we compared the rate of large-scale mosaicism between 1,303 children with developmental disorders and 5,094 children lacking developmental disorders, using an analytical pipeline we developed, and identified a substantial enrichment in cases (odds ratio=39.4, p value 1.073e-6). A meta-analysis that included frequency estimates among an additional 7,000 children with congenital diseases yielded an even stronger statistical enrichment (p value 1.784e-11). In addition, to maximize detection of low-clonality events in probands, we applied a trio-based mosaic detection algorithm, which detected two additional events in probands, including an individual with genome-wide suspected chimerism. In total, we detected 12 structural mosaic abnormalities among 1,303 children (0.9%). Given the burden of mosaicism detected in cases, we suspected that many of the events detected in probands were pathogenic. Scrutiny of the genotypic-phenotypic relationship of each detected variant assessed that the majority of events are very likely pathogenic. This work quantifies the burden of structural mosaicism as a cause of developmental disorders. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.
    Human Molecular Genetics 01/2015; 24(10). DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddv033 · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite three decades of successful, predominantly phenotype-driven discovery of the genetic causes of monogenic disorders, up to half of children with severe developmental disorders of probable genetic origin remain without a genetic diagnosis. Particularly challenging are those disorders rare enough to have eluded recognition as a discrete clinical entity, those with highly variable clinical manifestations, and those that are difficult to distinguish from other, very similar, disorders. Here we demonstrate the power of using an unbiased genotype-driven approach to identify subsets of patients with similar disorders. By studying 1,133 children with severe, undiagnosed developmental disorders, and their parents, using a combination of exome sequencing and array-based detection of chromosomal rearrangements, we discovered 12 novel genes associated with developmental disorders. These newly implicated genes increase by 10% (from 28% to 31%) the proportion of children that could be diagnosed. Clustering of missense mutations in six of these newly implicated genes suggests that normal development is being perturbed by an activating or dominant-negative mechanism. Our findings demonstrate the value of adopting a comprehensive strategy, both genome-wide and nationwide, to elucidate the underlying causes of rare genetic disorders.
    Nature 12/2014; 10(7542-Chr X). DOI:10.1038/nature14135 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Human genome sequencing has transformed our understanding of genomic variation and its relevance to health and disease, and is now starting to enter clinical practice for the diagnosis of rare diseases. The question of whether and how some categories of genomic findings should be shared with individual research participants is currently a topic of international debate, and development of robust analytical workflows to identify and communicate clinically relevant variants is paramount. Methods: The Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) study has developed a UK-wide patient recruitment network involving over 180 clinicians across all 24 regional genetics services, and has performed genome-wide microarray and whole exome sequencing on children with undiagnosed developmental disorders and their parents. After data analysis, pertinent genomic variants were returned to individual research participants via their local clinical genetics team. Findings: Around 80 000 genomic variants were identified from exome sequencing and microarray analysis in each individual, of which on average 400 were rare and predicted to be protein altering. By focusing only on de novo and segregating variants in known developmental disorder genes, we achieved a diagnostic yield of 27% among 1133 previously investigated yet undiagnosed children with developmental disorders, whilst minimising incidental findings. In families with developmentally normal parents, whole exome sequencing of the child and both parents resulted in a 10-fold reduction in the number of potential causal variants that needed clinical evaluation compared to sequencing only the child. Most diagnostic variants identified in known genes were novel and not present in current databases of known disease variation. Interpretation: Implementation of a robust translational genomics workflow is achievable within a large-scale rare disease research study to allow feedback of potentially diagnostic findings to clinicians and research participants. Systematic recording of relevant clinical data, curation of a gene–phenotype knowledge base, and development of clinical decision support software are needed in addition to automated exclusion of almost all variants, which is crucial for scalable prioritisation and review of possible diagnostic variants. However, the resource requirements of development and maintenance of a clinical reporting system within a research setting are substantial.
    The Lancet 12/2014; 385(9975). DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61705-0 · 45.22 Impact Factor
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    The Lancet 12/2014; DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)62119-X · 45.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Given the growing use of whole-exome sequencing (WES) for clinical diagnostics of complex human disorders, we evaluated coverage of clinically relevant cardiac genes on WES and factors influencing uniformity and depth of coverage of exonic regions. Methods Two hundred and thirteen human DNA samples were exome sequenced via Illumina HiSeq using different versions of the Agilent SureSelect capture kit. 50 cardiac genes were further analyzed including 31 genes from the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) list for reporting of incidental findings and 19 genes associated with congenital heart disease for which clinical testing is available. Gene coordinates were obtained from two databases, CCDS and Known Gene and compared. Read depth for each region was extracted from the exomes and used to assess capture variability between kits for individual genes, and for overall coverage. GC content, gene size, and inter-sample variability were also tested as potential contributors to variability in gene coverage. Results All versions of capture kits (designed based on Consensus coding sequence) included only 55% of known genomic regions for the cardiac genes. Although newer versions of each Agilent kit showed improvement in capture of CCDS regions to 99%, only 64% of Known Gene regions were captured even with newer capture kits. There was considerable variability in coverage of the cardiac genes. 10 of the 50 genes including 6 on the ACMG list had less than the optimal coverage of 30X. Within each gene, only 32 of the 50 genes had the majority of their bases covered at an interquartile range ≥30X. Heterogeneity in gene coverage was modestly associated with gene size and significantly associated with GC content. Conclusions Despite improvement in overall coverage across the exome with newer capture kit versions and higher sequencing depths, only 50% of known genomic regions of clinical cardiac genes are targeted and individual gene coverage is non-uniform. This may contribute to a bias with greater attribution of disease causation to mutations in well-represented and well-covered genes. Improvements in WES technology are needed before widespread clinical application.
    BMC Medical Genomics 12/2014; 7(1):67. DOI:10.1186/s12920-014-0067-8 · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Copy number variants (CNVs) have been proposed as a possible source of 'missing heritability' in complex human diseases. Two studies of type 1 diabetes (T1D) found null associations with common copy number polymorphisms, but CNVs of low frequency and high penetrance could still play a role. We used the Log-R-Ratio intensity data from a dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, ImmunoChip, to detect rare CNV deletions (rDELs) and duplications (rDUPs) in 6,808 T1D cases, 9,954 controls, and 2,206 families with T1D-affected offspring. Initial analyses detected CNV associations. However, these were shown to be false positive findings, failing replication with PCR. We developed a pipeline of quality control (QC) tests that were calibrated using systematic testing of sensitivity and specificity. The case-control odds ratios (OR) of CNV burden on T1D risk resulting from this QC pipeline converged on unity, suggesting no global frequency difference in rDELs or rDUPs. There was evidence that deletions could impact T1D risk for a small minority of cases, with enrichment for rDELs longer than 400 kb (OR=1.57, p=0.005). There were also 18 de novo rDELs detected in affected offspring but none for unaffected siblings (p=0.03). No specific CNV regions showed robust evidence for association with T1D, although frequencies were lower than expected (most less than 0.1%), substantially reducing statistical power, which was examined in detail. We present an R-package, plumbCNV, which provides an automated approach for quality control (QC) and detection of rare CNVs that can facilitate equivalent analyses of large-scale SNP array datasets. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.
    Human Molecular Genetics 11/2014; 24(6). DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddu581 · 6.68 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

20k Citations
2,670.07 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2015
    • Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
      • Cancer Genome Project
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2014
    • The University of Edinburgh
      • MRC Human Genetics Unit
      Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • 2001–2014
    • University of Cambridge
      • McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2006
    • University of Oxford
      • Department of Biochemistry
      Oxford, England, United Kingdom
  • 1999–2001
    • University of Leicester
      • Department of Genetics
      Leicester, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2000
    • Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom