Ana Tereza R Vasconcelos

Laboratório Nacional de Computação Científica, Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Publications (89)271.12 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In order to understand how fungal pathogens can survive inside the host, we must analyze how they evade the fungicidal mechanisms mounted by the host's immune system, such as generation of toxic reactive oxygen species. Studies have shown that infections caused by Sporothrix brasiliensis can be more aggressive than those due to Sporothrix schenckii. Therefore, we propose to analyze and compare the ability of these two pathogenic species to counteract oxidative stress, which, as noted, can be relevant in the host response to infection. We have shown that S. brasiliensis is more resistant to different oxidants, such as H2O2 and menadione, when compared with S. schenckii. Furthermore, our results suggest that the molecular mechanisms by which Sporothrix spp. AP-1 like transcription factors are regulated probably differs from the one seen in other fungal pathogens. Interestingly, comparison between sequences of SbHog1 and SsHog1 stress activated protein kinases suggest that S. brasiliensis Hog1 display mutations that could account for the differences seen in stress sensitivities of these two species. In summary, this is the first study to our knowledge to investigate oxidative stress responses of Sporothrix spp. and provided a model that can be employed in vivo to address how these fungal pathogens can surmount the oxidative stress generated by the host. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Medical Mycology 12/2014; · 2.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sporotrichosis is one of the most frequent subcutaneous fungal infections to human and animals caused by members of the plant-associated, dimorphic genus Sporothrix. Three of the four medically important Sporothrix species found in Brazil have been considered asexual, as no sexual stage has ever been reported in S. schenckii, S. brasiliensis or S. globosa. We have identified the mating-type (MAT) loci in the S. schenckii (strain 1099-18/ATCC MYA-4821) and S. brasiliensis (strain 5110/ATCC MYA-4823) genomes by using comparative genomic approaches and to determine the mating type ratio in these pathogens populations. Our analysis revealed the presence of a MAT1-1 locus in S. schenckii while a MAT1-2 locus was found in the S. brasiliensis presenting genomic synteny to other Sordariomycetes. Furthermore, the components of the MAPK-pheromone pathway, pheromone processing enzymes as well as meiotic regulators have also been identified in the two pathogens, suggesting the potential for sexual reproduction. The MAT1-1:MAT1-2 ratio was not significantly different from 1:1 all three Sporothrix species, but the population of S. brasiliensis in the outbreaks was originated from a single mating type. We also explored the population genetic structure of these pathogen populations using sequence data of two loci to improve our knowledge on the pattern of geographic distribution, genetic variation and virulence phenotypes. Population genetics data showed significant population differentiation and clonality with low level of haplotype diversity in S. brasiliensis from different regions of sporotrichosis outbreaks in Brazil. In contrast, S. schenckii demonstrated a high degree of genetic variability without significant geographic differentiation, indicating the presence of recombination. This study demonstrated that two species causing the same disease have contrasting reproductive strategies and genetic variability patterns. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
    Eukaryotic Cell 12/2014; · 3.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The swine respiratory ciliary epithelium is mainly colonized by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis. While colonization by M. flocculare is virtually asymptomatic, M. hyopneumoniae and M. hyorhinis infections may cause respiratory disease. Information regarding transcript structure and gene abundance provides valuable insight into gene function and regulation, which has not yet been analyzed on a genome-wide scale in these Mycoplasma species. In this study, we report the construction of transcriptome maps for M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis, which represent data for conducting comparative studies on the transcriptional repertory. For each species, three cDNA libraries were generated, yielding averages of 415,265, 695,313 and 93,578 reads for M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis, respectively, with an average read length of 274 bp. The reads mapping showed that 92%, 98% and 96% of the predicted genes were transcribed in the M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis genomes, respectively. Moreover, we showed that the majority of the genes are co-expressed, confirming the previously predicted transcription units. Finally, our data defined the RNA populations in detail, with the map transcript boundaries and transcription unit structures on a genome-wide scale.
    PLoS ONE 10/2014; 9(10):e110327. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate protozoan parasite infecting humans and other wild and domestic mammals across Central and South America. It does not cause human disease, but it can be mistaken for the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. We have sequenced the T. rangeli genome to provide new tools for elucidating the distinct and intriguing biology of this species and the key pathways related to interaction with its arthropod and mammalian hosts. Methodology/Principal Findings: The T. rangeli haploid genome is ,24 Mb in length, and is the smallest and least repetitive trypanosomatid genome sequenced thus far. This parasite genome has shorter subtelomeric sequences compared to those of T. cruzi and T. brucei; displays intraspecific karyotype variability and lacks minichromosomes. Of the predicted 7,613 protein coding sequences, functional annotations could be determined for 2,415, while 5,043 are hypothetical proteins, some with evidence of protein expression. 7,101 genes (93%) are shared with other trypanosomatids that infect humans. An ortholog of the dcl2 gene involved in the T. brucei RNAi pathway was found in T. rangeli, but the RNAi machinery is non-functional since the other genes in this pathway are pseudogenized. T. rangeli is highly susceptible to oxidative stress, a phenotype that may be explained by a smaller number of anti-oxidant defense enzymes and heat-shock proteins. Conclusions/Significance: Phylogenetic comparison of nuclear and mitochondrial genes indicates that T. rangeli and T. cruzi are equidistant from T. brucei. In addition to revealing new aspects of trypanosome co-evolution within the vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, comparative genomic analysis with pathogenic trypanosomatids provides valuable new information that can be further explored with the aim of developing better diagnostic tools and/or therapeutic targets. Citation: Stoco PH, Wagner G, Talavera-Lopez C, Gerber A, Zaha A, et al. (2014) Genome of the Avirulent Human-Infective Trypanosome—Trypanosoma rangeli. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 8(9): e3176. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003176 Copyright: ß 2014 Stoco et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: This work was supported by grants from CNPq, CAPES, and FINEP (Brazilian Government Agencies). PHS, DB, GW, EBP, FML, MHdM, DDL, and TCMS were recipients of CNPq or CAPES Scholarships; MAC was a visiting professor at FAPESP. The funders had no role in the study design, data generation and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 09/2014; 8(9):e3176. · 4.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fungal chitin metabolism involves diverse processes such as metabolically active cell wall maintenance, basic nutrition, and different aspects of virulence. Chitinases are enzymes belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 18 (GH18) and 19 (GH19) and are responsible for the hydrolysis of β-1,4-linkages in chitin. This linear homopolymer of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine is an essential constituent of fungal cell walls and arthropod exoskeletons. Several chitinases have been directly implicated in structural, morphogenetic, autolytic and nutritional activities of fungal cells. In the entomopathogen Metarhizium anisopliae, chitinases are also involved in virulence. Filamentous fungi genomes exhibit a higher number of chitinase-coding genes than bacteria or yeasts. The survey performed in the M. anisopliae genome has successfully identified 24 genes belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 18, including three previously experimentally determined chitinase-coding genes named chit1, chi2 and chi3. These putative chitinases were classified based on domain organization and phylogenetic analysis into the previously described A, B and C chitinase subgroups, and into a new subgroup D. Moreover, three GH18 proteins could be classified as putative endo-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidases, enzymes that are associated with deglycosylation and were therefore assigned to a new subgroup E. The transcriptional profile of the GH18 genes was evaluated by qPCR with RNA extracted from eight culture conditions, representing different stages of development or different nutritional states. The transcripts from the GH18 genes were detected in at least one of the different M. anisopliae developmental stages, thus validating the proposed genes. Moreover, not all members from the same chitinase subgroup presented equal patterns of transcript expression under the eight distinct conditions studied. The determination of M. anisopliae chitinases and ENGases and a more detailed study concerning the enzymes' roles in morphological or nutritional functions will allow comprehensive insights into the chitinolytic potential of this highly infective entomopathogenic fungus.
    PLoS ONE 09/2014; 9(9):e107864. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Washington, DC; 09/2014
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    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY Certain trypanosomatids co-evolve with an endosymbiotic bacterium in a mutualistic relationship that is characterized by intense metabolic exchanges. Symbionts were able to respire for up to 4 h after isolation from Angomonas deanei. FCCP (carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone) similarly increased respiration in wild-type and aposymbiotic protozoa, though a higher maximal O2 consumption capacity was observed in the symbiont-containing cells. Rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, did not affect A. deanei respiration, whereas TTFA (thenoyltrifluoroacetone), a complex II activity inhibitor, completely blocked respiration in both strains. Antimycin A and cyanide, inhibitors of complexes III and IV, respectively, abolished O2 consumption, but the aposymbiotic protozoa were more sensitive to both compounds. Oligomycin did not affect cell respiration, whereas carboxyatractyloside (CAT), an inhibitor of the ADP-ATP translocator, slightly reduced O2 consumption. In the A. deanei genome, sequences encoding most proteins of the respiratory chain are present. The symbiont genome lost part of the electron transport system (ETS), but complex I, a cytochrome d oxidase, and FoF1-ATP synthase remain. In conclusion, this work suggests that the symbiont influences the mitochondrial respiration of the host protozoan.
    Parasitology 08/2014; · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The soybean-Bradyrhizobium symbiosis can be highly efficient in fixing nitrogen, but few genomic sequences of elite inoculant strains are available. Here we contribute with information on the genomes of two commercial strains that are broadly applied to soybean crops in the tropics. B. japonicum CPAC 15 (=SEMIA 5079) is outstanding in its saprophytic capacity and competitiveness, whereas B. diazoefficiens CPAC 7 (=SEMIA 5080) is known for its high efficiency in fixing nitrogen. Both are well adapted to tropical soils. The genomes of CPAC 15 and CPAC 7 were compared to each other and also to those of B. japonicum USDA 6T and B. diazoefficiens USDA 110T.
    BMC Genomics 06/2014; 15(1):420. · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infection caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a growing concern, especially in eastern Europe. We report an annotated draft genome sequence of M. tuberculosis strain G-12-005 obtained from a patient in Georgia.
    Genome Announcements 05/2014; 2(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The genus Paracoccidioides comprises human thermal dimorphic fungi, which cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important mycosis in Latin America. Adaptation to environmental conditions is key to fungal survival during human host infection. The adaptability of carbon metabolism is a vital fitness attribute during pathogenesis. The fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides spp. is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, in the human host. In this study, a comprehensive response of Paracoccidioides, Pb01, under carbon starvation was investigated using high-resolution transcriptomic (RNAseq) and proteomic (NanoUPLC-MSE) approaches. A total of 1,063 transcripts and 421 proteins were differentially regulated, providing a global view of metabolic reprogramming during carbon starvation. The main changes were those related to cells shifting to gluconeogenesis and ethanol production, supported by the degradation of amino acids and fatty acids and by the modulation of the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic cycles. This proposed carbon flow hypothesis was supported by gene and protein expression profiles assessed using qRT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, as well as using enzymatic, cell dry weight and fungus-macrophage interaction assays. The carbon source provides a survival advantage to Paracoccidioides inside macrophages. For a complete understanding of the physiological processes in an organism, the integration of approaches addressing different levels of regulation is important. To the best of our knowledge, this report presents the first description of the responses of Paracoccidioides spp. to host-like conditions using large-scale expression approaches. The alternative metabolic pathways that could be adopted by the organism during carbon starvation can be important for a better understanding of the fungal adaptation to the host, because systems for detecting and responding to carbon sources play a major role in adaptation and persistence in the host niche.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 05/2014; 8(5):e2855. · 4.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although microorganisms play crucial roles in ecosystems, metagenomic analyses of soil samples are quite scarce, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. In this work, the microbial diversity of soil samples from an Atlantic Forest and Caatinga was analyzed using a metagenomic approach. Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the dominant phyla in both samples. Among which, a significant proportion of stress-resistant bacteria associated to organic matter degradation was found. Sequences related to metabolism of amino acids, nitrogen, and DNA and stress resistance were more frequent in Caatinga soil, while the forest sample showed the highest occurrence of hits annotated in phosphorous metabolism, defense mechanisms, and aromatic compound degradation subsystems. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed that our samples are close to the desert metagenomes in relation to taxonomy, but are more similar to rhizosphere microbiota in relation to the functional profiles. The data indicate that soil characteristics affect the taxonomic and functional distribution; these characteristics include low nutrient content, high drainage (both are sandy soils), vegetation, and exposure to stress. In both samples, a rapid turnover of organic matter with low greenhouse gas emission was suggested by the functional profiles obtained, reinforcing the importance of preserving natural areas.
    MicrobiologyOpen. 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with nosocomial and community-acquired infections. A wide repertoire of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes is present in K. pneumoniae genomes, which can constitute extra challenges in the treatment of infections caused by some strains. K. pneumoniae Kp13 is a multidrug-resistant strain responsible for causing a large nosocomial outbreak in a teaching hospital located in Southern Brazil. Kp13 produces K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC-2) but is unrelated to isolates belonging to ST 258 and ST 11, the main clusters associated with the worldwide dissemination of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae. In this report, we perform a genomic comparison between Kp13 and each of the following three K. pneumoniae genomes: MGH 78578, NTUH-K2044 and 342. We have completely determined the genome of K. pneumoniae Kp13, which comprises one chromosome (5.3 Mbp) and six plasmids (0.43 Mbp). Several virulence and resistance determinants were identified in strain Kp13. Specifically, we detected genes coding for six beta-lactamases (SHV-12, OXA-9, TEM-1, CTX-M-2, SHV-110 and KPC-2), eight adhesin-related gene clusters, including regions coding for types 1 (fim) and 3 (mrk) fimbrial adhesins. The rmtG plasmidial 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene was also detected, as well as efflux pumps belonging to five different families. Mutations upstream the OmpK35 porin-encoding gene were evidenced, possibly affecting its expression. SNPs analysis relative to the compared strains revealed 141 mutations falling within CDSs related to drug resistance which could also influence the Kp13 lifestyle. Finally, the genetic apparatus for synthesis of the yersiniabactin siderophore was identified within a plasticity region. Chromosomal architectural analysis allowed for the detection of 13 regions of difference in Kp13 relative to the compared strains. Our results indicate that the plasticity occurring at many hierarchical levels (from whole genomic segments to individual nucleotide bases) may play a role on the lifestyle of K. pneumoniae Kp13 and underlie the importance of whole-genome sequencing to study bacterial pathogens. The general chromosomal structure was somewhat conserved among the compared bacteria, and recombination events with consequent gain/loss of genomic segments appears to be driving the evolution of these strains.
    BMC Genomics 01/2014; 15(1):54. · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The draft genome sequence of the yeast Spathaspora arborariae UFMG-HM19.1A(T) (CBS 11463 = NRRL Y-48658) is presented here. The sequenced genome size is 12.7 Mb, consisting of 41 scaffolds containing a total of 5,625 predicted open reading frames, including many genes encoding enzymes and transporters involved in d-xylose fermentation.
    Genome Announcements 01/2014; 2(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Trypanosoma cruzi affects millions of people worldwide. Clinical variability of Chagas disease can be due to the genetic variability of this parasite, requiring further genome studies. Here we report the genome sequence of the T. cruzi Dm28c clone (TcI), a strain related to the sylvatic cycle of the parasite.
    Genome Announcements 01/2014; 2(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Although magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats, they are still considered fastidious microorganisms with regard to growth and cultivation with only a relatively low number of axenic cultures available to date. Here, we report the first axenic culture of an MTB isolated in the Southern Hemisphere (Itaipu Lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Cells of this new isolate are coccoid to ovoid in morphology and grow microaerophilically in semi-solid medium containing an oxygen concentration ([O2]) gradient either under chemoorganoheterotrophic or chemolithoautotrophic conditions. Each cell contains a single chain of approximately 10 elongated cuboctahedral magnetite (Fe3O4) magnetosomes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence shows that the coccoid MTB isolated in this study represents a new genus in the Alphaproteobacteria; the name Magnetofaba australis strain IT-1 is proposed. Preliminary genomic data obtained by pyrosequencing shows that M. australis strain IT-1 contains a genomic region with genes involved in biomineralization similar to those found in the most closely related magnetotactic cocci Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1. However, organization of the magnetosome genes differs from M. marinus.
    Frontiers in Microbiology 01/2014; 5:72. · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Some non-pathogenic trypanosomatids maintain a mutualistic relationship with a betaproteobacterium of the Alcaligenaceae family. Intensive nutritional exchanges have been reported between the two partners, indicating that these protozoa are excellent biological models to study metabolic co-evolution. We previously sequenced and herein investigate the entire genomes of five trypanosomatids which harbor a symbiotic bacterium (SHTs for Symbiont-Haboring Trypanosomatids) and the respective bacteria (TPEs for Trypanosomatid Proteobacterial Endosymbiont), as well as two trypanosomatids without symbionts (RTs for Regular Trypanosomatids), for the presence of genes of the classical pathways for vitamin biosynthesis. Our data show that genes for the biosynthetic pathways of thiamine, biotin, and nicotinic acid are absent from all trypanosomatid genomes. This is in agreement with the absolute growth requirement for these vitamins in all protozoa of the family. Also absent from the genomes of RTs are the genes for the synthesis of pantothenic acid, folic acid, riboflavin, and vitamin B6. This is also in agreement with the available data showing that RTs are auxotrophic for these essential vitamins. On the other hand, SHTs are autotrophic for such vitamins. Indeed, all the genes of the corresponding biosynthetic pathways were identified, most of them in the symbiont genomes, while a few genes, mostly of eukaryotic origin, were found in the host genomes. The only exceptions to the latter are: the gene coding for the enzyme ketopantoate reductase (EC:1.1.1.169) which is related instead to the Firmicutes bacteria; and two other genes, one involved in the salvage pathway of pantothenic acid and the other in the synthesis of ubiquinone, that are related to Gammaproteobacteria. Their presence in trypanosomatids may result from lateral gene transfer. Taken together, our results reinforce the idea that the low nutritional requirement of SHTs is associated with the presence of the symbiotic bacterium, which contains most genes for vitamin production.
    PLoS ONE 11/2013; 8(11):e79786. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis (Ca. M. multicellularis) is a member of a group of uncultured magnetotactic prokaryotes that possesses a unique multicellular morphology. To better understand this organism's physiology, we used a genomic approach through pyrosequencing. Genomic data analysis corroborates previous structural studies and reveals the proteins that are likely involved in multicellular morphogenesis of this microorganism. Interestingly, some detected protein sequences that might be involved in cell adhesion are homologues to phylogenetically unrelated filamentous multicellular bacteria proteins, suggesting their contribution in the early development of multicellular organization in Bacteria. Genes related to the behavior of Ca. M. multicellularis (chemo-, photo- and magnetotaxis) and its metabolic capabilities were analyzed. On the basis of the genomic-physiologic information, enrichment media were tested. One medium supported chemoorganoheterotrophic growth of Ca. M. multicellularis and allowed the microorganisms to maintain their multicellular morphology and cell cycle, confirming for the first time that the entire life cycle of the MMP occurs in a multicellular form. Because Ca. M. multicellularis has a unique multicellular life style, its cultivation is an important achievement for further studies regarding the multicellular evolution in prokaryotes.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 7 November 2013; doi:10.1038/ismej.2013.203.
    The ISME Journal 11/2013; · 8.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mangroves are among the most productive and biologically important environments. The possible presence of cellulolytic enzymes and microorganisms useful for biomass degradation as well as taxonomic and functional aspects of two Brazilian mangroves were evaluated using cultivation and metagenomic approaches. From a total of 296 microorganisms with visual differences in colony morphology and growth (including bacteria, yeast and filamentous fungus), 179 (60.5%) and 117 (39.5%) were isolated from the Rio de Janeiro (RJ) and Bahia (BA) samples, respectively. RJ metagenome showed the higher number of microbial isolates, which is consistent with its most conserved state and higher diversity. The metagenomic sequencing data showed similar predominant bacterial phyla in the BA and RJ mangroves with an abundance of Proteobacteria (57.8% and 44.6%), Firmicutes (11% and 12.3%) and Actinobacteria (8.4% and 7.5%). A higher number of enzymes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic compounds were found in the BA mangrove. Specific sequences involved in the cellulolytic degradation, belonging to cellulases, hemicellulases, carbohydrate binding domains, dockerins and cohesins were identified, and it was possible to isolate cultivable fungi and bacteria related to biomass decomposition and with potential applications for the production of biofuels. These results showed that the mangroves possess all fundamental molecular tools required for building the cellulosome, which is required for the efficient degradation of cellulose material and sugar release.
    AMB Express. 10/2013; 3(1):65.
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    ABSTRACT: The laminin (LM)-database, hosted at http://www.lm.lncc.br, was published in the NAR database 2011 edition. It was the first database that provided comprehensive information concerning a non-collagenous family of extracellular matrix proteins, the LMs. In its first version, this database contained a large amount of information concerning LMs related to health and disease, with particular emphasis on the haemopoietic system. Users can easily access several tabs for LMs and LM-related molecules, as well as LM nomenclatures and direct links to PubMed.The LM-database version 2.0 integrates data from several publications to achieve a more comprehensive knowledge of LMs in health and disease. The novel features include the addition of two new tabs, 'Neuromuscular Disorders' and 'miRNA--LM Relationship'. More specifically, in this updated version, an expanding set of data has been displayed concerning the role of LMs in neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the putative involvement of microRNAs. Given the importance of LMs in several biological processes, such as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell death, this upgraded version expands for users a panoply of information, regarding complex molecular circuitries that involve LMs in health and disease, including neuromuscular and neurodegenerative disorders.
    Nucleic Acids Research 10/2013; · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Soil conservation practices are critical for agricultural sustainability, and in this study the shotgun sequencing approach was used to investigate the effects on soil biodiversity of different soil- and crop-management practices in a 13-year field trial in southern Brazil. Treatments consisted of conventional tillage (CT) with plowing and disking, or no-tillage (NT) with direct sowing into the residues of previous crops, in a crop succession [soybean (summer)/wheat (winter)] or rotation [soybean/maize (summer)/wheat/lupine/oat (winter)]. About 1 million reads per treatment revealed very high levels of diversity. The majority of the sequences were attributed to the Bacteria (54%), and 0.3% and 0.2% fitted into Archaea and Eucarya domains, respectively; 46% showed no similarity with any known sequences. Major differences were associated with tillage and, to a lesser extent, with crop management. Statistically significant higher abundances with CT encompassed microorganisms associated with residue decomposition, carbon and nitrogen cycling, and xenobiosis. Eucarya were also more abundant with CT, possibly related to higher tolerance of environmental stresses. In contrast, NT showed higher abundances particularly of nitrogen-fixing Rhizobiales and Archaea that inhabit environments rich in organic matter.
    Applied Soil Ecology 10/2013; 72:49–61. · 2.21 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

837 Citations
271.12 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2014
    • Laboratório Nacional de Computação Científica
      Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    • Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
      La Jolla, California, United States
    • Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA)
      Brasília, Federal District, Brazil
  • 2011–2013
    • Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
      • • Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho (IBCCF)
      • • Institute of Biology
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    • University of Buenos Aires
      • Department of Organic Chemistry (FFYB)
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
  • 2012
    • University of São Paulo
      • Department of Botany
      São Paulo, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • 2008–2009
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      • Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology
      Houston, TX, United States
    • National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, Brazil
      Palmyra, Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • 2007
    • National Bioinformatics Center, Cuba
      La Habana, Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba
  • 2005
    • Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul
      • Centro de Biotecnologia (CBiot)
      Porto Alegre, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil