M. Marchand

Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin, Versailles, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (59)97.78 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The correlation between tropical stratospheric ozone and UV radiation on solar rotational time scales is investigated using daily satellite ozone observations and reconstructed solar spectra. We consider two 3-year periods falling within the descending phases of two 11-year solar cycles 22 (1991-1994) and 23 (2004-2007). The UV rotational cycle is highly irregular and even disappears for half a year during cycle 23. For the 1991-1994 period, ozone and 205 nm UV flux are found to be correlated between about 10 and 1 hPa with a maximum of 0.29 at ~5 hPa; ozone sensitivity (percentage change in ozone for 1 percent change in UV) peaks at ~0.4. Correlation during cycle 23 is weaker with a peak ozone sensitivity of 0.2. The correlation is found to vary widely, not only with altitude, but also from one year to the next with a rotational signal in ozone appearing almost intermittent. Unexpectedly, the correlation is not found to bear any relation with the solar rotational forcing. For instance, solar rotational fluctuations are by far the strongest during 1991-1992 whereas the correlation peaks at the end of 1993, a rotationally quiescent period. When calculated over sliding intervals of 1-year, the sensitivity is found to vary very strongly within both 3-year periods; it is almost negligible over the entire vertical profile during some 1-year intervals or reaches close to 1 around 2–5 mb for other intervals. Other sources of variability, presumably of dynamical origin, operate on the rotational spectral range and determine to a large extent the estimated solar rotational signal. Even considering 3 years of observations (corresponding to about 40 solar cycles), the extraction of the rotational solar signal does not appear to be robust during declining phases of 11-year solar cycles. As observational studies cover at best three 11-year solar cycles, it must be challenging to produce a reliable estimation of the 11-year solar cycle signal in stratospheric ozone, especially in the presence of decadal climate variability.
    Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 05/2015; 130-131. DOI:10.1016/j.jastp.2015.05.014 · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: [1] We have diagnosed the lifetimes of long-lived source gases emitted at the surface and removed in the stratosphere using six three-dimensional chemistry-climate models (CCMs) and a two-dimensional model. The models all used the same standard photochemical data. We investigate the effect of different definitions of lifetimes, including running the models with both mixing ratio (MBC) and flux (FBC) boundary conditions. Within the same model, the lifetimes diagnosed by different methods agree very well. Using FBCs versus MBCs leads to a different tracer burden as the implied lifetime contained in the MBC value does not necessarily match a model's own calculated lifetime. In general, there are much larger differences in the lifetimes calculated by different models, the main causes of which are variations in the modelled rates of ascent and horizontal mixing in the tropical mid-lower stratosphere. The model runs have been used to compute instantaneous and steady-state lifetimes. For chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) their atmospheric distribution was far from steady state in their growth phase through to the 1980s and the diagnosed instantaneous lifetime is accordingly much longer. Following the cessation of emissions, the resulting decay of CFCs is much closer to steady-state. For 2100 conditions the model circulation speeds generally increase, but a thicker ozone layer due to recovery and climate change reduces photolysis rates. These effects compensate so the net impact on modelled lifetimes is small. For future assessments of stratospheric ozone use of FBCs would allow a consistent balance between rate of CFC removal and model circulation rate.
    03/2014; 119(5). DOI:10.1002/2013JD021097
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    ABSTRACT: Traditional validation of atmospheric profiles is based on the intercomparison of two or more data sets in predefined ranges or classes of a given observational characteristic such as latitude or solar zenith angle. In this study we trained a self-organising map (SOM) with a full time series of relative difference profiles of SCIAMACHY limb v5.02 and lidar ozone profiles from seven observation sites. Each individual observation characteristic was then mapped to the obtained SOM to investigate to which degree variation in this characteristic is explanatory for the variation seen in the SOM map. For the studied data sets, altitude-dependent relations for the global data set were found between the difference profiles and studied variables. From the lowest altitude studied (18 km) ascending, the most influencing factors were found to be longitude, followed by solar zenith angle and latitude, sensor age and again solar zenith angle together with the day of the year at the highest altitudes studied here (up to 45 km). After accounting for both latitude and longitude, residual partial correlations with a reduced magnitude are seen for various factors. However, (partial) correlations cannot point out which (combination) of the factors drives the observed differences between the ground-based and satellite ozone profiles as most of the factors are inter-related. Clustering into three classes showed that there are also some local dependencies, with for instance one cluster having a much stronger correlation with the sensor age (days since launch) between 36 and 42 km. The proposed SOM-based approach provides a powerful tool for the exploration of differences between data sets without being limited to a priori defined data subsets.
    01/2014; 7(4):4373-4406. DOI:10.5194/amtd-7-4373-2014
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    ABSTRACT: The international research project RECONCILE has addressed central questions regarding polar ozone depletion, with the objective to quantify some of the most relevant yet still uncertain physical and chemical processes and thereby improve prognostic modelling capabilities to realistically predict the response of the ozone layer to climate change. This overview paper outlines the scope and the general approach of RECONCILE, and it provides a summary of observations and modelling in 2010 and 2011 that have generated an in many respects unprecedented dataset to study processes in the Arctic winter stratosphere. Principally, it summarises important outcomes of RECONCILE including (i) better constraints and enhanced consistency on the set of parameters governing catalytic ozone destruction cycles, (ii) a better understanding of the role of cold binary aerosols in heterogeneous chlorine activation, (iii) an improved scheme of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) processes that includes heterogeneous nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and ice on non-volatile background aerosol leading to better model parameterisations with respect to denitrification, and (iv) long transient simulations with a chemistry-climate model (CCM) updated based on the results of RECONCILE that better reproduce past ozone trends in Antarctica and are deemed to produce more reliable predictions of future ozone trends. The process studies and the global simulations conducted in RECONCILE show that in the Arctic, ozone depletion uncertainties in the chemical and microphysical processes are now clearly smaller than the sensitivity to dynamic variability.
    ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 09/2013; DOI:10.5194/acpd-12-30661-2012 · 5.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: stratospheric ozone depletion has acted to cool the Earth's surface. As the result of the phase-out of anthropogenic halogenated compounds emissions, stratospheric ozone is projected to recover and its radiative forcing (RF-O3 ~ -0.05 W/m2 presently) might therefore be expected to decay in line with ozone recovery itself. Using results from chemistry-climate models, we find that, although model projections using a standard greenhouse gas scenario broadly agree on the future evolution of global ozone, they strongly disagree on RF-O3 because of a large model spread in ozone changes in a narrow (several km thick) layer, in the northern lowermost stratosphere. Clearly, future changes in global stratospheric ozone cannot be considered an indicator of its overall RF. The multi-model mean RF-O3 estimate for 2100 is +0.06 W/m2 but with a range such that it could remain negative throughout this century or change sign and reach up to ~0.25 W/m2.
    Geophysical Research Letters 06/2013; 40(11):2796-2800. DOI:10.1002/grl.50358 · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a summary of the scientific objectives, payload and mission profile of the Space Weather & Ultraviolet Solar Variability Microsatellite Mission (SWUSV) proposed to CNES and ESA (small mission).
    Luc Damé (2013). The Space Weather & Ultraviolet Solar Variability Microsatellite Mission (SWUSV) . Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union, 8, pp 525-526., china; 06/2013
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    ABSTRACT: We present the ambitions of the SWUSV (Space Weather and Ultraviolet Solar Variability) Microsatellite Mission that encompasses three major scientific objectives: (1) Space Weather including the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging); (2) solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance from 180 to 400 nm by bands of 20 nm, plus Lyman-Alpha and the CN bandhead); (3) simultaneous radiative budget of the Earth, UV to IR, with an accuracy better than 1% in differential. The paper briefly outlines the mission and describes the five proposed instruments of the model payload: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200–220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); UPR (Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with 64 UV filter radiometers; a vector magnetometer; thermal plasma measurements and Langmuir probes; and a total and spectral solar irradiance and Earth radiative budget ensemble (SERB, Solar irradiance & Earth Radiative Budget). SWUSV is proposed as a small mission to CNES and to ESA for a possible flight as early as 2017–2018.
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    ABSTRACT: We present the global general circulation model IPSL-CM5 developed to study the long-term response of the climate system to natural and anthropogenic forcings as part of the 5th Phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). This model includes an interactive carbon cycle, a representation of tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, and a comprehensive representation of aerosols. As it represents the principal dynamical, physical, and bio-geochemical processes relevant to the climate system, it may be referred to as an Earth System Model. However, the IPSL-CM5 model may be used in a multitude of configurations associated with different boundary conditions and with a range of complexities in terms of processes and interactions. This paper presents an overview of the different model components and explains how they were coupled and used to simulate historical climate changes over the past 150 years and different scenarios of future climate change. A single version of the IPSL-CM5 model (IPSL-CM5A-LR) was used to provide climate projections associated with different socio-economic scenarios, including the different Representative Concentration Pathways considered by CMIP5 and several scenarios from the Special Report on Emission Scenarios considered by CMIP3. Results suggest that the magnitude of global warming projections primarily depends on the socio-economic scenario considered, that there is potential for an aggressive mitigation policy to limit global warming to about two degrees, and that the behavior of some components of the climate system such as the Arctic sea ice and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation may change drastically by the end of the twenty-first century in the case of a no climate policy scenario. Although the magnitude of regional temperature and precipitation changes depends fairly linearly on the magnitude of the projected global warming (and thus on the scenario considered), the geographical pattern of these changes is strikingly similar for the different scenarios. The representation of atmospheric physical processes in the model is shown to strongly influence the simulated climate variability and both the magnitude and pattern of the projected climate changes.
    Climate Dynamics 02/2013; 40(9-10):2123–2165. DOI:10.1007/s00382-012-1636-1 · 4.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present an evaluation of observations from the Lidar Ozone and Aerosol for NDACC in Antarctica (LOANA) at the Dumont d’Urville station, Antarctica. This instrument is part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), and ensures continuity with lidar measurements made since 1989 with the previous instrument at this site. This study is based on the dataset from 2008 to 2009, and comparisons are made with observations from balloon soundings, and from three satellite experiments: Aura/MLS, TIMED/SABER, and CALIOP/CALIPSO. The lidar ozone data are in very good agreement with the balloon sounding data (ECC sensor), revealing a bias of less than 3% between 17 and 34 km. For temperature, the lidar shows a low bias of −3 K at 20 km when compared with Aura/MLS. Between 30 and 50 km, the bias is less than 2 K. We also present our initial results showing diurnal variations in temperature. The amplitude of these diurnal cycles is on the order of 1 K and is unlikely to account for the temperature biases between LOANA and the reference instruments. Comparisons of total attenuated backscatter reveal good qualitative agreement between LOANA and CALIOP, with differences of less than 30% in the derived optical depth.
    Polar Science 08/2012; 6(3-4). DOI:10.1016/j.polar.2012.07.001
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    ABSTRACT: Global aerosol and ozone distributions and their associated radiative forcings were simulated between 1850 and 2100 following a recent historical emission dataset and under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) for the future. These simulations were used in an Earth System Model (ESM) to account for the changes in both radiatively and chemically active compounds, when simulating the climate evolution. The past negative stratospheric ozone trends results in a negative climate forcing culminating at 0.15 W.m-2 in the 90's. In the meantime, the tropospheric ozone burden increases generates a positive climate forcing peaking at 0.41 W.m-2. The future Powered by Editorial Manager® and Preprint Manager® from Aries Systems Corporation
    Climate Dynamics 05/2012; 40(9-10-10.1007/s00382-012-1408-y). DOI:10.1007/s00382-012-1408-y · 4.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Global Atmosphere Watch of WMO includes several stations in Antarctica that keep a close eye on the ozone layer during the ozone hole season. Observations made during the ozone holes from 2003 to 2011 will be compared to each other and interpreted in light of the meteorological conditions. Satellite observations will be used to get a more general picture of the size and depth of the ozone hole and will also be used to calculate various metrics for ozone hole severity. In 2003, 2005 and 2006, the ozone hole was relatively large with more ozone loss than normal. This is in particular the case for 2006, which by most ozone hole metrics was the most severe ozone hole on record. On the other hand, the ozone holes of 2004, 2007 and 2010 were less severe than normal, and only the very special ozone hole of 2002 had less ozone depletion when one regards the ozone holes of the last decade. The ozone hole of 2011 suffered more ozone depletion than in 2010, but it was quite average in comparison to other years of the last decade. The interannual variability will be discussed with the help of meteorological data, such as temperature conditions, possibility for polar stratospheric clouds, vortex shape and vortex longevity. Observations will also be compared to 3-D chemical transport model calculations.
    European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2012, Vienna, Austria; 04/2012
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    ABSTRACT: The Global Atmosphere Watch of WMO includes several stations in Antarctica that keep a close eye on the ozone layer during the ozone hole season. Observations made during the ozone holes from 2003 to 2010 will be compared to each other and interpreted in light of the meteorological conditions. Satellite observations will be used to get a more general picture of the size and depth of the ozone hole and will also be used to calculate various metrics for ozone hole severity. In 2003, 2005 and 2006, the ozone hole was relatively large with more ozone loss than normal. This is in particular the case for 2006, which by most ozone hole metrics was the most severe ozone holeon record. On the other hand, the ozone holes of 2004 ,2007 and 2010 were less severe than normal, and only the very special ozone hole of 2002 had less ozone depletion when one regards the ozone holes of the last decade. The interannual variability will be discussed with the help of meteorological data, such as temperature conditions, possibility for polar stratospheric clouds, vortex shape and vortex longevity. Observations will also be compared to 3-D chemical transport model calculations.
    European Geosciences Union General Assembly, Vienna, Austria; 04/2011
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    ABSTRACT: 1] The stratospheric climate and variability from simulations of sixteen chemistry‐ climate models is evaluated. On average the polar night jet is well reproduced though its variability is less well reproduced with a large spread between models. Polar temperature biases are less than 5 K except in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) lower stratosphere in spring. The accumulated area of low temperatures responsible for polar stratospheric cloud formation is accurately reproduced for the Antarctic but underestimated for the Arctic. The shape and position of the polar vortex is well simulated, as is the tropical upwelling in the lower stratosphere. There is a wide model spread in the frequency of major sudden stratospheric warnings (SSWs), late biases in the breakup of the SH vortex, and a weak annual cycle in the zonal wind in the tropical upper stratosphere. Quantitatively, "metrics" indicate a wide spread in model performance for most diagnostics with systematic biases in many, and poorer performance in the SH than in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). Correlations were found in the SH between errors in the final warming, polar temperatures, the leading mode of variability, and jet strength, and in the NH between errors in polar temperatures, frequency of major SSWs, and jet strength. Models with a stronger QBO have stronger tropical upwelling and a colder NH vortex. Both the qualitative and quantitative analysis indicate a number of common and long‐standing model problems, particularly related to the simulation of the SH and stratospheric variability.
    Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres 01/2011; 116. DOI:10.1029/2010JD014995 · 3.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the frame of the third CAWSES tidal campaign in June–August 2007, lidar and satellite data were collected and compared with numerical models. Continuous nocturnal middle atmospheric temperature measurements performed with a Rayleigh lidar located at La Reunion Island (20.8°S–55.5°E) were obtained for three subsequent nights. The results clearly show the presence of tidal components with a downward phase propagation. Comparisons with SABER satellite data show good agreement on tidal amplitude; however, some differences on the structures are reported probably due to the zonal nature of the retrieval provided by the SABER data. The observed tidal components are compared with two different numerical models such as the 2D global scale wave model and the 3D-GCM LMDz-REPROBUS. Both models reveal good agreement with temperature lidar patterns, while simulated tidal amplitudes are smaller by a factor of around 2–2.5 K.
    Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 10/2010; DOI:10.1016/j.jastp.2010.07.013 · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Global Atmosphere Watch of WMO includes several stations in Antarctica that keep a close eye on the ozone layer during the ozone hole season. Observations made during the ozone holes from 2003 to 2009 will be compared to each other and interpreted in light of the meteorological conditions. Satellite observations will be used to get a more general picture of the size and depth of the ozone hole and will also be used to calculate various metrics for ozone hole severity. In 2003, 2005 and 2006, the ozone hole was relatively large with more ozone loss than normal. This is in particular the case for 2006, which by most ozone hole metrics was the most severe ozone hole on record. On the other hand, the ozone holes of 2004 and 2007 were less severe than normal, and only the very special ozone hole of 2002 had less ozone depletion when one regards the ozone holes of the last decade. The interannual variability will be discussed with the help of meteorological data, such as temperature conditions, possibility for polar stratospheric clouds, vortex shape and vortex longevity. Observations will also be compared to 3-D chemical transport model calculations.
    European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2010; 05/2010
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    ABSTRACT: At the French Antarctic Station in Dumont d'Urville, balloon soundings are performed on a routine basis to get profiles of stratospheric temperature and ozone. In addition, a multiwavelength Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar system also allows for measurements of stratospheric temperature, ozone and aerosol density along with characterisation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). The temperature data have been analyzed from 1979 to 2008 with respect to trends revealing a cooling of 0.5 and 1.4 K/decade at 20 km in summer and fall, respectively, and a warming of 1.1 K/decade in spring. Despite the absence of a significant trend in winter, an increase in the occurrence of temperatures below the NAT threshold in the last 20 years is observed. We further investigate the statistical distribution of the ozone and temperature measurements owing to the fact that, in spring, Dumont d'Urville is located at the vortex edge and hence airmasses inside and outside the vortex are sampled alternatively. These investigations will contribute to the validation of Climate Chemistry Models.
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    ABSTRACT: The stellar occultation spectrometer GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars) on ESA's Envisat satellite measures vertical profiles O3, NO2 and NO3 with a high long-term stability due to the self-calibrating nature of the technique. More than 6 years of GOMOS data from August 2002 to end 2008 have been analysed to study the inter-annual variation of O3, NO2 and NO3 in the tropics. It is shown that the QBO of the equatorial wind induces variations in the local concentration larger than 10% for O3 and larger than 25% for NO2. Quasi-Biennial Oscillation signals can be found in the evolution of the three constituents up to at least 40 km. We found that NO3 is positively correlated with temperature up to 45 km in the region where it is in chemical equilibrium with O3. Our results confirm the existence of a transition from a dynamical control of O3 below 28 km with O3 correlated with temperature and a chemical/temperature control between 28 and 38 km with O3 anti-correlated with NO2 and temperature. Above 38 km and up to 50 km a different regime is found with O3 and NO2 correlated with each other and anti-correlated with temperature. For the NO2/temperature anti-correlation in the upper stratosphere, our proposed explanation is the modulation of the N2O ascent by the QBO up to 45 km. The oxidation of N2O is the main source of NOy in this altitude region. An enhancement of the ascending motion will cool adiabatically the atmosphere and will increase the amount of N2O concentration available for NOy formation.
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    ABSTRACT: The evolution of stratospheric ozone from 1960 to 2100 is examined in simulations from 14 chemistry-climate models, driven by prescribed levels of halogens and greenhouse gases. There is general agreement among the models that total column ozone reached a minimum around year 2000 at all latitudes, projected to be followed by an increase over the first half of the 21st century. In the second half of the 21st century, ozone is projected to continue increasing, level off, or even decrease depending on the latitude. Separation into partial columns above and below 20 hPa reveals that these latitudinal differences are almost completely caused by differences in the model projections of ozone in the lower stratosphere. At all latitudes, upper stratospheric ozone increases throughout the 21st century and is projected to return to 1960 levels well before the end of the century, although there is a spread among models in the dates that ozone returns to specific historical values. We find decreasing halogens and declining upper atmospheric temperatures, driven by increasing greenhouse gases, contribute almost equally to increases in upper stratospheric ozone. In the tropical lower stratosphere, an increase in upwelling causes a steady decrease in ozone through the 21st century, and total column ozone does not return to 1960 levels in most of the models. In contrast, lower stratospheric and total column ozone in middle and high latitudes increases during the 21st century, returning to 1960 levels well before the end of the century in most models.
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    ABSTRACT: Projections of stratospheric ozone from a suite of chemistry-climate models (CCMs) have been analyzed. In addition to a reference simulation where anthropogenic halogenated ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases (GHGs) vary with time, sensitivity simulations with either ODS or GHG concentrations fixed at 1960 levels were performed to disaggregate the drivers of projected ozone changes. These simulations were also used to assess the two distinct milestones of ozone returning to historical values (ozone return dates) and ozone no longer being influenced by ODSs (full ozone recovery). The date of ozone returning to historical values does not indicate complete recovery from ODSs in most cases, because GHG-induced changes accelerate or decelerate ozone changes in many regions. In the upper stratosphere where CO2-induced stratospheric cooling increases ozone, full ozone recovery is projected to not likely have occurred by 2100 even though ozone returns to its 1980 or even 1960 levels well before (~2025 and 2040, respectively). In contrast, in the tropical lower stratosphere ozone decreases continuously from 1960 to 2100 due to projected increases in tropical upwelling, while by around 2040 it is already very likely that full recovery from the effects of ODSs has occurred, although ODS concentrations are still elevated by this date. In the midlatitude lower stratosphere the evolution differs from that in the tropics, and rather than a steady decrease in ozone, first a decrease in ozone is simulated from 1960 to 2000, which is then followed by a steady increase through the 21st century. Ozone in the midlatitude lower stratosphere returns to 1980 levels by ~2045 in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and by ~2055 in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), and full ozone recovery is likely reached by 2100 in both hemispheres. Overall, in all regions except the tropical lower stratosphere, full ozone recovery from ODSs occurs significantly later than the return of total column ozone to its 1980 level. The latest return of total column ozone is projected to occur over Antarctica (~2045–2060) whereas it is not likely that full ozone recovery is reached by the end of the 21st century in this region. Arctic total column ozone is projected to return to 1980 levels well before polar stratospheric halogen loading does so (~2025–2030 for total column ozone, cf. 2050–2070 for Cly+60×Bry) and it is likely that full recovery of total column ozone from the effects of ODSs has occurred by ~2035. In contrast to the Antarctic, by 2100 Arctic total column ozone is projected to be above 1960 levels, but not in the fixed GHG simulation, indicating that climate change plays a significant role.
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 01/2010; DOI:10.5194/acp-10-9451-2010 · 4.88 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

963 Citations
97.78 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2015
    • Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin
      • Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)
      Versailles, Île-de-France, France
  • 2013
    • LATMOS
      Guyancourt, Île-de-France, France
  • 2012
    • Polytech Paris-UPMC
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2002–2010
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2004–2007
    • Institut Pierre Simon Laplace
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France