M Danesh Mesgaran

Ferdowsi University Of Mashhad, Mashad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran

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Publications (57)17.91 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation with a mixture of essential oils (MEO), yeast culture (YC) and malate on performance, nutrient digestion, rumen fermentation and blood metabolites of lambs fed high-concentrate growing diets. For this purpose, twenty Baluchi lambs (17.3 ± 0.5 kg body weight and 3 months old) were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments in a completely randomized design with five lambs per treatment. The treatment groups were as follows: (i) control: basal diet without any additive, (ii) basal diet plus 400 mg/day MEO (thymol, carvacrol, eugenol, limonene and cinnamaldehyde), (iii) basal diet with 4 g/day YC and (iv) basal diet plus 4 g/day malate. No differences between the dietary treatments were observed in dry matter intake, average daily gain or feed conversion ratio (p > 0.05). Compared with control and malate treatment, lambs fed MEO and YC had an improved crude protein digestibility (p < 0.05). Yeast culture significantly increased (p > 0.05) cell wall digestibility compared to the other treatments. No differences were observed between treatments with respect to nitrogen balance or ruminal pH and ammonia concentrations (p > 0.05). No differences were observed between treatments with respect to ruminal total volatile fatty acid concentration and molar proportions of acetate, butyrate and valerate. Molar proportion of propionate was higher (p < 0.05) for YC and malate compared to control and MEO. Plasma glucose concentration was higher (p < 0.05) in lambs fed YC and malate than in lambs fed the control or the MEO diet. Blood concentration of triglycerides significantly decreased when feeding the MEO and YC diets (p < 0.05). It was concluded that YC may be more useful as a feed additive for manipulation of rumen fermentation in lambs fed with high-concentrate diets than MEO and malate, because YC enhanced crude protein and cell wall digestibility, ruminal molar proportion of propionate and plasma glucose concentration.
    J Anim Physiol a Anim Nutr 07/2014; · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    Atefeh Babaei, Javad Arshami, Alireza Haghparast, Mohsen Danesh Mesgaran
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Saffron petal is a by-product that contains flavonoids and anthocyanins. In order to study the effects of saffron petal extract (SPE) on blood parameters, immune system, and spleen histology, five treatments (n=6) were used in a completely randomized design. Materials and Methods: The treatments were 0, 75, 150, 225, and 450 mg/kg body weight of SPE. The SPE was injected intraperitoneally to 30 rats (10-week old, weighing 225±15 g) for 14 days. Immunization was performed using 1×10(8) sheep red blood cells (SRBC) on days 0 and 7 subcutaneously in all treatment groups. On day 15, blood was collected from the heart of rats after anesthesia. One part of samples were poured in heparinized tubes for counting whole blood cells (CBC) and different white blood cells (WBC) and the other part was used to measure IgG using ELISA technique. The spleen was stained by hematoxylin- eosin for histological study. The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA program and the means evaluation was done using Tukey's test. Results are presented as mean±SD. Results: Results showed no significant difference between treatments and control group regarding the amount of RBC, HGB, HCT, and PLT. The level of IgG at 75 mg/kg was significantly increased in comparison with other groups. No changes were observed in spleen histology. Conclusion: The results indicate that use of SPE at dose of 75 mg/kg causes an increase in antibody response without any change in hematological parameters and spleen histology.
    Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine 03/2014; 4(2):103-9.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate productive, metabolic and ovarian responses of different timing to start lipogenic diet in dairy cows. Thirty-six multiparous cows were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 treatments in a completely randomized design. All cows were fed a similar glucogenic diet, 21 days before expected calving date. After parturition, they received a glucogenic diet until 42 days in milk (DIM; GGG) or shifted to a lipogenic diet at either 1 (GLL) or 21(GGL) DIM and remained on these diets until 42 DIM. After the day 42 postpartum, all cows returned to a common stall and received a mixed lipogenic and glucogenic (50:50) diet until 100 DIM. Postpartum dry matter intake (DMI) was lower (P<0.05) and body weight, body condition score, milk yield, milk protein, and milk lactose contents tended to be lesser (P<0.1) for the GLL group; however, negativity of energy balance, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), cholesterol, and urea concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.05). Glucose concentration and number of follicles ≥10 mm diameter were significantly higher (P<0.05) but BHBA and NEFA concentrations were lower (P<0.05) for the GLL group compared to other two groups. For the GLL group days to ovulation and cervical diameter were significantly higher (P<0.05). The conclusion is that providing a lipogenic diet immediately after calving has negative effects on energy balance, metabolic status and follicular dynamics of dairy cows. However, offering a glucogenic diet during −21 to +42 days relative to calving was more effective in improving animal performance and ovarian activity. This strategy may be enhancing the pregnancy rate.
    Livestock Science. 01/2014;
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    Mohsen Danesh Mesgaran, javad Amini, M. Paktinat
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    ABSTRACT: Batch cultures of mixed rumen microorganisms were used in a randomized complete block design to study the effects of alfalfa hay-to-concentrate ratio and various non-organic buffering compounds on Acidogenic Value (AV), in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD), medium pH, and AV: IVDMD ratio. Alfalfa hay was included in the experimental diets as: 80% (F80), 60% (F60), 40% (F40), and 20% (F20) on a dry matter (DM) basis. Buffering compounds were added to the experimental diets as: Sodium bicarbonate [SB; 5 or 10 mg.g-1 DM], magnesium oxide (MgO; 5 or 10 mg.g-1 DM), sodium bentonite (bentonite;10 or 20 mg.g-1 DM), Acid Buf® (5, 10 or 20 mg.g-1 DM), Acid Buf + SB in a 3:4 ratio (11 or 16.5 mg.g-1 DM), Acid Buf + SB + MgO in a 3:4:1 ratio (12.5 or 18.75 mg.g-1 DM), and Herod’s Buffer (5, 10 or 20 mg.g-1 DM); keeping one group as control (no supplementation). After 24 h incubation, no significant differences observed in medium pH among SB, MgO, bentonite and the control, but Herod’s Buffer, Acid Buf, Acid Buf + SB, and Acid Buf + SB + MgO kept it up (P≤ 0.05). The lowest AV and AV: IVDMD ratios were observed when SB was used in the cultures (P≤ 0.05). Herod’s buffer IVDMD was the lowest (P≤ 0.05). The results indicated that the diet containing Acid Buf and SB had a relatively low AV and AV: IVDMD, and could maintain a relatively high rumen fluid pH compared with those of the others. Key words: Acidogenic value, in vitro dry matter disappearance, buffers.
    International Journal of Livestock Production. 12/2013; 4(10):165-171.
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    A R Vakili, B Khorrami, M Danesh Mesgaran, E Parand
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    ABSTRACT: Essential oils have been shown to favorably effect in vitro ruminal fermentation, but there are few in vivo studies that have examined animal responses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of thyme (THY) and cinnamon (CIN) essential oils on feed intake, growth performance, ruminal fermentation and blood metabolites in feedlot calves fed high-concentrate diets. Twelve growing Holstein calves (213±17 kg initial BW) were used in a completely randomized design and received their respective dietary treatments for 45 d. Treatments were: 1-control (no additive), 2-THY (5 g/d/calf) and 3-CIN (5 g/d/calf). Calves were fed ad libitum diets consisting of 15% forage and 85% concentrate, and adapted to the finishing diet by gradually increasing the concentrate ratio with feeding a series of transition diets 5 wk before the experiment started. Supplementation of THY or CIN did not affect DMI and ADG, and feed efficiency was similar between treatment groups. There were no effects of additives on ruminal pH and rumen concentrations of ammonia nitrogen and total VFA; whereas molar proportion of acetate and ratio of acetate to propionate decreased, and the molar proportion of propionate increased with THY and CIN supplementation. Rumen molar concentration of butyrate was significantly increased by adding CIN compared to control; but no change was observed with THY compared with control group. No effects of THY, or CIN were observed on valerate, isobutyrate or isovalerate proportions. Plasma concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, urea-N, β-hydroxybutyrate, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were not changed by feeding THY or CIN. Results from this study suggest that supplementing a feedlot finishing diet with THY or CIN essential oil might be useful as ruminal fermentation modifiers in beef production systems, but has minor impacts on blood metabolites.
    Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 07/2013; 26(7):935-44. · 0.64 Impact Factor
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    T Mohammadabadi, M Danesh Mesgaran, M Chaji, R Tahmasebi
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    A Riasi, M Danesh Mesgaran, M D Stern, M J Ruiz Moreno
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    ABSTRACT: Eight continuous culture fermenters were used in a completely randomized design to evaluate various nutritional values of Kochia (Kochia scoparia) compared with Atriplex (Atriplex dimorphostegia). Dried and pelleted samples (leaves and stems) provided substrate for metabolism by ruminal microbes maintained in a continuous culture fermentation system. Results indicated that there were no differences (p>0.05) in dry matter (DM) and crude protein (CP) digestibility between the two halophytic plants. Atriplex had higher (p<0.05) organic matter (OM) digestibility compared with Kochia. Neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) digestibility of Atriplex (411 g/kg) was higher (p<0.05) than that of Kochia (348 g/kg), however acid detergent fiber (ADF) digestibility was higher (p<0.05) in Kochia compared with Atriplex (406 vs. 234 g/kg). There were no differences (p>0.05) between the two halophytic plants in molar proportion of acetate and propionate, but the concentration of butyrate and valerate in Kochia were about two fold of Atriplex (p<0.05). When Kochia provided substrate to the microbes, protein synthesis was higher (p<0.05) compared with feeding Atriplex (5.96 vs. 4.85 g N/kg of OM truly digested). It was concluded that Kochia scoparia and Atriplex dimorphostegia had similar digestibility of DM and CP. It appears that these halophytic plants may not have enough digestible energy for high producing ruminants.
    Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 05/2012; 25(5):642-7. · 0.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the effects of supplementation of fish oil and canola oil in the diet on milk yield, milk components and fatty acid composition of Holstein dairy cows in early lactation. Eight multiparous early lactation Holstein cows (42±12 DIM, 40±6 kg daily milk yield) were fed a total mixed ration supplemented with either 0% oil (Control), 2% fish oil (FO), 1% canola oil +1% fish oil (FOCO), or 2% canola oil (CO) according to a double 4×4 Latin square design. Each period lasted 3 wk; experimental analyses were restricted to the last week of each period. Supplemental oils were added to a basal diet which was formulated according to NRC (2001) and consisted of 20% alfalfa, 20% corn silage and 60% concentrate. Milk yield was similar between diets (p>0.05), but dry matter intake (DMI) was lower (p<0.05) in cows fed FO diet compared to other diets. Milk fat percentage and daily yield decreased (p<0.01) with the supplementation of fish and canola oil. The daily yield and percentage of milk protein, lactose and solids-not-fat (SNF) were not affected by diets (p>0.05). The proportion (g/100 g fatty acids) of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) decreased and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) increased (p<0.05) in milk of all cows fed diets supplemented with oil. The proportions of 6:0, 8:0, 10:0 12:0 and 14:0 fatty acids in milk fat decreased (p<0.01) for all diets supplemented with oil, but the proportions of 14:1, 16:0 and 16:1 fatty acids were not affected by diets (p>0.05). The proportion of trans(t)-18:1 increased (p<0.01) in milk fat of cows fed FO and FOCO diets, but CO diet had the highest proportion of cis(c)-11 18:1 (p<0.01). The concentration of t-10, c-12 18:2, c-9 t-11 18:2, 18:3, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) increased (p<0.05) in FO and FOCO diets in comparison with the other two diets. These data indicate that including fish oil in combination with canola oil significantly modifies the fatty acid composition of milk.
    Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 03/2012; 25(3):311-9. · 0.64 Impact Factor
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    Alireza Heravi Moussavi, Mohsen Danesh Mesgaran, Robert O Gilbert
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of postpartum mastitis between first calving and subsequent conception on production and reproduction performance as well as culling of Holstein cows. A data set of 9,183 first lactation cows was used. Results showed that the first cumulative 100 days' milk production and the milk yield standardized to 305 days were affected by the interval from calving to first mastitis (P < 0.05). Cows with one episode of mastitis produced more milk than those with repeated episodes of mastitis (P < 0.01). Increase in the number of mastitis episodes and also decrease in interval between first calving and mastitis increased services per conception (P < 0.001). Mastitis episode and the interval between calving and first mastitis had no apparent impact on the calving to conception interval (P > 0.05). Calving year, calving difficulty score, and cumulative first 60 days milk production had significant impacts on mastitis risk (P < 0.05). The interval from calving to the first incidence of mastitis decreased over the period studied (P < 0.001). Productive life tended to be decreased due to mastitis (P = 0.07). Survival analysis showed a significant difference between the lengths of productive life for cows with different intervals from calving to first mastitis (P < 0.01). The results demonstrated that clinical mastitis between first calving and conception reduced production and reproduction performance with an increase in chance of culling.
    Tropical Animal Health and Production 02/2012; 44(7):1567-73. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    T Mohammadabadi, M Danesh Mesgaran, M Chaji, R Tahmasebi
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    ABSTRACT: The major aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fat content of sunflower meal (150 and 30 g fat /kg dry matter, high and low fat, respectively) on population, growth and activity of rumen anaerobic fungi by using direct (quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction, QC-PCR) and indirect (dry matter (DM) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) disappearance in rumen fungi media culture for 12 days) methods. The results of QC-PCR showed that rumen anaerobic fungi population in the medium containing high fat sunflower meal was greater as compared to low fat sunflower meal (+0.14 vs. +0.10) (P<0.05). Also, disappearance of dry matter after 12 days incubation with rumen fungi will be 36.1 and 35.7 g/100 g DM for high and low fat sunflower meal, respectively) (P>0.05). High fat of sunflower meal caused increase in natural detergent fibre disappearance 12 days after culturing as compared to low fat sunflower meal (145.2 vs 139.2 mg/g dry matter, respectively) (P<0.05). Therefore, it appears that fat content of sunflower meal does not negatively affect the population, growth and activity of rumen fungi.
    AFRICAN JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY 01/2012; 11(1):179-183. · 0.57 Impact Factor
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    M. Mojtahedi, M. Danesh Mesgaran
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the effects of substituting various concentrations of dried molassed sugar beet pulp (SBP) for barley grain in low-forage diets on chewing behavior, ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibilities and blood biochemical parameters using four ruminally cannulated Holstein steers in a 4 × 4 Latin square design over 28-day periods. Steers (368 ± 8 kg initial body weight) were fed 9.5 kg of dietary dry matter (DM) as a total mixed ration (TMR) (containing 350 g forage and 650 g concentrate per kg DM) twice daily at 0800 and 1600 h. The diets were formulated to supply approximately 2.3 times the maintenance requirements of the animals so that there was no refusal. Barley grain in the basal experimental diet (330 g/kg DM) was replaced with 0, 110, 220 and 330 g SBP on a DM basis to create the experimental diets SBP0, SBP110, SBP220 and SBP330, respectively. Ruminal fluid was collected by suction through the rumen cannula from before the morning feeding (0.0 h) to 8 h after feeding at 30-min intervals. Eating, ruminating and total chewing time linearly (P < 0.01) increased with the proportion of SBP in the diet. Moreover, mean ruminal pH showed linear and quadratic increases (P < 0.05) with the inclusion of SBP. In contrast, the substitution of SBP for barley grain resulted in a linear and quadratic decrease (P < 0.01) in the mean ruminal ammonia concentration, which was highest in steers fed SBP0. In addition inclusion of SBP gave significantly (P < 0.05) higher acetate and butyrate molar proportions and lower propionate and total volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentrations in the rumen fluid. Total tract apparent digestibility of DM and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) increased quadratically with the proportion of SBP in the diet, but crude protein (CP) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) digestibilities were similar among treatments. Plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) before the morning feeding decreased linearly (P < 0.01) with SBP inclusion and was highest and lowest for SBP0 and SBP330, respectively (21 vs. 16.26 mg/dl). Other blood biochemical parameters and venous blood gasses (including plasma glucose, blood pH, CO2 pressure, O2 pressure, oxygen saturation, base excess of extracellular fluid, base excess of blood and bicarbonate) were not affected by the treatments (P > 0.05). These results suggest that partial replacement of barley grain with SBP at low and moderate inclusion rates might improve the chewing behavior, ruminal environment and nutrient digestibility of Holstein steers fed low-forage diets.
    Livestock Science. 01/2011; 141:95-103.
  • Advances in Animal Biosciences. 04/2010; 1(01).
  • Advances in Animal Biosciences. 04/2010; 1(01).
  • T Mohammadabadi, M Danesh Mesgaran, M.R Nasiri, M Chaji
    Advances in Animal Biosciences. 04/2010; 1(01).
  • Advances in Animal Biosciences. 04/2010; 1(01).
  • Advances in Animal Biosciences. 04/2010; 1(01).
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    Advances in Animal Biosciences. 04/2010; 1(01).
  • Advances in Animal Biosciences. 04/2010; 1(01).
  • Advances in Animal Biosciences. 04/2010; 1(01).
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Methane produced during ruminal fermentation represents a loss of 2–12% of the gross energy consumed by ruminants, and it is also a greenhouse gas that has been implicated as a contributor to the global warming (Johnson and Johnson, 1995). Thus, much research has been carried out on manipulation of the rumen fermentation to inhibit rumen methanogenesis with a view to increase energetic efficiency. The present experiment was conducted to determine the effects of diets containing different non-fibre carbohydrates (NFC, sucrose or starch) on rumen methanogenesis bacteria and protozoa populations in Holstein steers by real time PCR. Material and methods Four Holstein steers (280± 15 kg, body weight) with rumen fistulae were assigned to a 4×4 Latin square design with 21 day periods; 17 days diet adjustment and 4 days sample collection. The basal diet contained lucerne hay, barley grain, soybean meal and sugar beet pulp (400, 290, 190 and 50 g/ kg, respectively). Starch (St) or sucrose (Su) or a 1:1 mixture of starch and sucrose (St+Su) was added to the basal diet at the rate of 70g/kg DM. Diets were offered at 2-2.5 times maintenance requirements (7kg DM/day). The samples of rumen fluid taken before the morning feed, and 4 h post feeding were stored in liquid N2 until used for bacterial and protozoa quantitation by qPCR. DNA was extracted from the samples using the QIAamp® DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen Ltd, Crawley, West Sussex, UK) following the manufacturer's instructions. Methanogenesis and protozoa rDNA concentrations were measured by real time PCR relative to total bacteria amplification (∆∆Ct). The 16s rRNA gene-targeted primer sets used in the present study for methanogenesis bacteria were forward: TTCGGTGGATCDCARAGRGC and reverse: GBARGTCGWAWCCGTAGAATCC. Cycling conditions were 95 °C for 5 min, forty six cycles of 95 °C for 15 s, 61 °C for 15 s and 72 °C for 15 s. The 18s rRNA gene-targeted primer sets used in the present study for protozoa were forward: GCTTTCGWTGGTAGTGTATT and reverse: CTTGCCCTCYAATCGTWCT. Cycling conditions were 95 °C for 5 min, fifty cycles of 95 °C for 15 s, 55 °C for 20 s and 72 °C for 30 s. fluorescence readings were taken after each extension step, and a final melting analysis was obtained by heating at 0.1 °C/s increment from 65 to 95 °C, with fluorescence collection at 0.1 °C at intervals. Data are express relative to quantification of the total bacterial population using the primers described by Maeda et al (2003). Data were analyzed using the GLM procedure of SAS (y = Mean + Treatment + Animal + Period + Time + Time × Treatment + residual) and the means compared by the Duncan test (P <0.05). Results Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) concentration of methanogenesis bacteria and protozoa in rumen fluid is shown in Figure1. Population of methanogenesis bacteria and protozoa in the ruminal fluid decreased, when basal diet was supplemented by either Sucrose or Starch (P <0.05). In addition St+Su has a higher significant decreasing effect on ruminal protozoa populations.
    Advances in Animal Biosciences. 04/2010; 1(01).

Publication Stats

55 Citations
17.91 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2014
    • Ferdowsi University Of Mashhad
      • Department of Animal Sciences
      Mashad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran
  • 2010
    • The Academy of Sciences of Islamic Republic of Iran
      Teheran, Tehrān, Iran
  • 2005
    • Islamic Azad University, Mashad
      Mashad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran