K. Lane

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Madrid, Spain

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Publications (34)97.83 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We perform a quantitative morphological comparison between the hosts of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and quiescent galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z~0.7). The imaging data are taken from the large HST/ACS mosaics of the GEMS and STAGES surveys. Our main aim is to test whether nuclear activity at this cosmic epoch is triggered by major mergers. Using images of quiescent galaxies and stars, we create synthetic AGN images to investigate the impact of an optical nucleus on the morphological analysis of AGN hosts. Galaxy morphologies are parameterized using the asymmetry index A, concentration index C, Gini coefficient G and M20 index. A sample of ~200 synthetic AGN is matched to 21 real AGN in terms of redshift, host brightness and host-to-nucleus ratio to ensure a reliable comparison between active and quiescent galaxies. The optical nuclei strongly affect the morphological parameters of the underlying host galaxy. Taking these effects into account, we find that the morphologies of the AGN hosts are clearly distinct from galaxies undergoing violent gravitational interactions. In fact, the host galaxies' distributions in morphological descriptor space are more similar to undisturbed galaxies than major mergers. Intermediate-luminosity (Lx < 10^44 erg/s) AGN hosts at z~0.7 show morphologies similar to the general population of massive galaxies with significant bulges at the same redshifts. If major mergers are the driver of nuclear activity at this epoch, the signatures of gravitational interactions fade rapidly before the optical AGN phase starts, making them undetectable on single-orbit HST images, at least with usual morphological descriptors. This could be investigated in future synthetic observations created from numerical simulations of galaxy-galaxy interactions.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 10/2012; · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a new automatic method to identify galaxy mergers using the morphological information contained in the residual images of galaxies after the subtraction of a smooth Sérsic model. The removal of the bulk signal from the host galaxy light is done with the aim of detecting the much fainter and elusive minor mergers. The specific morphological parameters that are used in the merger diagnostic suggested here are the residual flux fraction (RFF) and the asymmetry of the residuals [A(Res)]. The new diagnostic has been calibrated and optimized so that the resulting merger sample is very complete. However, the contamination by non-mergers is also high. If the same optimization method is adopted for combinations of other structural parameters such as the Concentration, Asymmetry, clumpineSs (CAS) system, the merger indicator we introduce yields merger samples of equal or higher statistical quality than the samples obtained through the use of other structural parameters. We investigate the ability of the method presented here to select minor mergers by identifying a sample of visually classified mergers that would not have been picked up by the use of the CAS system, when using its usual limits. However, given the low prevalence of mergers among the general population of galaxies and the optimization used here, we find that the merger diagnostic introduced in this work is best used as a negative merger test, that is, it is very effective at selecting non-merging galaxies. In common with all the currently available automatic methods, the sample of merger candidates selected is heavily contaminated by non-mergers, and further steps are needed to produce a clean merger sample. This merger diagnostic has been developed using the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS F606W images of the A901/902 multiple cluster system (z= 0.165) obtained by the Space Telescope A901/902 Galaxy Evolution Survey team. In particular, we have focused on a mass- and magnitude-limited sample (log M/M⊙ > 9.0, RVega, Total≤ 23.5 mag) which includes 905 cluster galaxies and 655 field galaxies of all morphological types.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 11/2011; 419(3):2703 - 2724. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present an automatic method to identify galaxy mergers using the morphological information contained in the residual images of galaxies after the subtraction of a Sersic model. The removal of the bulk signal from the host galaxy light is done with the aim of detecting the fainter minor mergers. The specific morphological parameters that are used in the merger diagnostic suggested here are the Residual Flux Fraction and the asymmetry of the residuals. The new diagnostic has been calibrated and optimized so that the resulting merger sample is very complete. However, the contamination by non-mergers is also high. If the same optimization method is adopted for combinations of other structural parameters such as the CAS system, the merger indicator we introduce yields merger samples of equal or higher statistical quality than the samples obtained through the use of other structural parameters. We explore the ability of the method presented here to select minor mergers by identifying a sample of visually classified mergers that would not have been picked up by the use of the CAS system, when using its usual limits. Given the low prevalence of mergers among the general population of galaxies and the optimization used here, we find that the merger diagnostic introduced in this work is best used as a negative merger test, i.e., it is very effective at selecting non-merging galaxies. As with all the currently available automatic methods, the sample of merger candidates selected is contaminated by non-mergers, and further steps are needed to produce a clean sample. This merger diagnostic has been developed using the HST/ACS F606W images of the A901/02 cluster (z=0.165) obtained by the STAGES team. In particular, we have focused on a mass and magnitude limited sample (log M/M_{O}>9.0, R_{Vega}<23.5mag)) which includes 905 cluster galaxies and 655 field galaxies of all morphological types.
    09/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: We use the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey to trace the evolution of galaxy clustering to z = 3. Using photometric redshifts derived from data covering the wavelength range 0.3 - 4.5 um we examine this clustering as a function of absolute K-band luminosity, colour and star-formation rate. Comparing the deprojected clustering amplitudes, we find that red galaxies are more strongly clustered than blue galaxies out to at least z = 1.5, irrespective of rest-frame K-band luminosity. We then construct passive and star-forming samples based on stellar age, colour and star-formation histories calculated from the best fitting templates. The clustering strength of star-forming galaxies declines steadily from r_0 ~ 7 h^-1 Mpc at z ~ 2 to r_0 ~ 3 h^-1 Mpc at z ~ 0, while passive galaxies have clustering strengths up to a factor of two higher. Within the passive and star-forming subsamples, however, we find very little dependence of galaxy clustering on K-band luminosity. Galaxy `passivity' appears to be the strongest indicator of clustering strength. We compare these clustering measurements with those predicted for dark matter halos and conclude that passive galaxies typically reside in halos of mass M > 10^13 M_sun while luminous star-forming galaxies occupy halos an order of magnitude less massive over the range 0.5 < z < 1.5. The decline in the clustering strength of star-forming galaxies with decreasing redshift indicates a decline in the hosting halo mass for galaxies of a given luminosity. We find evidence for convergence of clustering in star-forming and passive galaxies around z ~ 2, which is consistent with this being the epoch at which the red sequence of galaxies becomes distinct.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 05/2010; 407. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a study on the clustering of a stellar mass selected sample of 18,482 galaxies with stellar masses M*>10^10M(sun) at redshifts 0.4<z<2.0, taken from the Palomar Observatory Wide-field Infrared Survey. We examine the clustering properties of these stellar mass selected samples as a function of redshift and stellar mass, and discuss the implications of measured clustering strengths in terms of their likely halo masses. We find that galaxies with high stellar masses have a progressively higher clustering strength, and amplitude, than galaxies with lower stellar masses. We also find that galaxies within a fixed stellar mass range have a higher clustering strength at higher redshifts. We furthermore use our measured clustering strengths, combined with models from Mo & White (2002), to determine the average total masses of the dark matter haloes hosting these galaxies. We conclude that for all galaxies in our sample the stellar-mass-to-total-mass ratio is always lower than the universal baryonic mass fraction. Using our results, and a compilation from the literature, we furthermore show that there is a strong correlation between stellar-mass-to-total-mass ratio and derived halo masses for central galaxies, such that more massive haloes contain a lower fraction of their mass in the form of stars over our entire redshift range. For central galaxies in haloes with masses M(halo)>10^13M(sun) we find that this ratio is <0.02, much lower than the universal baryonic mass fraction. We show that the remaining baryonic mass is included partially in stars within satellite galaxies in these haloes, and as diffuse hot and warm gas. We also find that, at a fixed stellar mass, the stellar-to-total-mass ratio increases at lower redshifts. This suggests that galaxies at a fixed stellar mass form later in lower mass dark matter haloes, and earlier in massive haloes. We interpret this as a "halo downsizing" effect, however some of this evolution could be attributed to halo assembly bias.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 03/2010; 406. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the properties of bright (MV <= -18) barred and unbarred disks in the Abell 901/902 cluster system at z~0.165 with the STAGES HST ACS survey. To identify and characterize bars, we use ellipse-fitting. We use visual classification, a Sersic cut, and a color cut to select disk galaxies, and find that the latter two methods miss 31% and 51%, respectively of disk galaxies identified through visual classification. This underscores the importance of carefully selecting the disk sample in cluster environments. However, we find that the global optical bar fraction in the clusters is ~30% regardless of the method of disk selection. We study the relationship of the optical bar fraction to host galaxy properties, and find that the optical bar fraction depends strongly on the luminosity of the galaxy and whether it hosts a prominent bulge or is bulgeless. Within a given absolute magnitude bin, the optical bar fraction increases for galaxies with no significant bulge component. Within each morphological type bin, the optical bar fraction increases for brighter galaxies. We find no strong trend (variations larger than a factor of 1.3) for the optical bar fraction with local density within the cluster between the core and virial radius (R ~ 0.25 to 1.2 Mpc). We discuss the implications of our results for the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments. Comment: 7 pages, 2 figures; To appear in "Tumbling, twisting, and winding galaxies: Pattern speeds along the Hubble sequence", E. M. Corsini and V. P. Debattista (eds.), Memorie della Societa` Astronomica Italiana
    02/2010;
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    Galaxy Evolution: Emerging Insights and Future Challenges; 12/2009
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    ABSTRACT: Stellar bars are the most efficient internal drivers of disk evolution because they redistribute material and angular momentum within the galaxy and dark matter halo. Mounting evidence suggests that processes other than major mergers, such as minor mergers, secular processes driven by bars, and clump coalescence, as well as smooth accretion, play an important role in galaxy evolution since z = 2. As a key step toward characterizing this evolution and constraining theoretical models, we determine the frequency and properties of bars in the local Universe in both field and cluster environment, based on three of our studies: Marinova & Jogee (2007), Barazza, Jogee, & Marinova (2008) and Marinova et al. (2009). Among field spirals of intermediate Hubble types in the OSU survey, we find using ellipse fitting that the bar fraction is 44% in the optical and 60% in the NIR, giving an extinction correction factor of approximately 1.4 at z ˜ 0. Using data from the Abell 901/902 cluster system at z ˜ 0.165 from the HST ACS survey STAGES, we find that the optical bar fraction is a strong trend of both absolute magnitude and host bulge-to-total ratio, increasing for galaxies that are brighter and/or more disk-dominated. The latter trend is also found in the field from SDSS. For bright early types and faint late types the optical bar fraction in the cluster is similar to that in the field. We find that between the core region and the virial radii of the clusters the optical bar fraction is not a strong function of local environment density. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of theoretical models of the impact of bars on galaxy evolution.
    11/2009; 419:138.
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    ABSTRACT: We present a study of galaxy mergers and the influence of environment in the Abell 901/902 supercluster at z~ 0.165, based on 893 bright (R Vega<= 24) intermediate-mass (M * >= 109 M sun) galaxies. We use HST ACS F606W data from the Space Telescope A901/902 Galaxy Evolution Survey, COMBO-17, Spitzer 24 mum, and XMM-Newton X-ray data. Our analysis utilizes both a physically driven visual classification system and quantitative CAS parameters to identify systems which show evidence of a recent or ongoing merger of mass ratio >1/10 (i.e., major and minor mergers). Our results are (1) after visual classification and minimizing the contamination from false projection pairs, we find that the merger fraction f merge is 0.023 ± 0.007. The estimated fractions of likely major mergers, likely minor mergers, and ambiguous cases are 0.01 ± 0.004, 0.006 ± 0.003, and 0.007 ± 0.003, respectively. (2) All the mergers lie outside the cluster core of radius R< 0.25 Mpc: the lack of mergers in the core is likely due to the large galaxy velocity dispersion in the core. The mergers, instead, populate the region (0.25 Mpc <R<= 2 Mpc) between the core and the cluster outskirt. In this region, the estimated frequency of mergers is similar to those seen at typical group overdensities in N-body simulations of accreting groups in the A901/902 clusters. This suggests the ongoing growth of the clusters via accretion of group and field galaxies. (3) We compare our observed merger fraction with those reported in other clusters and groups out to z~ 0.4. Existing data points on the merger fraction for L <= L* galaxies in clusters allow for a wide spectrum of scenarios, ranging from no evolution to evolution by a factor of ~5 over z~ 0.17-0.4. (4) In A901/902, the fraction of interacting galaxies, which lie on the blue cloud is 80% ± 18% (16/20) versus 34% ± 7% or (294/866) for non-interacting galaxies, implying that interacting galaxies are preferentially blue. (5) The average star formation rate (SFR), based on UV or a combination of UV+IR data, is enhanced by a factor of ~1.5-2 in mergers compared to non-interacting galaxies. However, mergers in the A901/902 clusters contribute only a small fraction (between 10% and 15%) of the total SFR density, while the rest of the SFR density comes from non-interacting galaxies.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2009; · 6.73 Impact Factor
  • VizieR Online Data Catalog. 10/2009; 739:31275.
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    ABSTRACT: Galaxies migrate from the blue cloud to the red sequence when their star formation is quenched. Here, we report on galaxies quenched by environmental effects and not by mergers or strong AGN as often invoked: They form stars at a reduced rate which is optically even less conspicuous, and manifest a transition population of blue spirals evolving into S0 galaxies. These 'optically passive' or 'red spirals' are found in large numbers in the STAGES project (and by Galaxy Zoo) in the infall region of clusters and groups. Comment: Proceedings of "The Starburst-AGN connection" conference held in Shanghai, Oct 27-31, 2008
    06/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: We present a study of bar and host disk evolution in a dense cluster environment, based on a sample of ~800 bright (M V <= --18) galaxies in the Abell 901/2 supercluster at z~ 0.165. We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) F606W imaging from the STAGES survey, and data from Spitzer, XMM-Newton, and COMBO-17. We identify and characterize bars through ellipse-fitting, and other morphological features through visual classification. We find the following results. (1) To define the optical fraction of barred disk galaxies, we explore three commonly used methods for selecting disk galaxies. We find 625, 485, and 353 disk galaxies, respectively, via visual classification, a single component Sérsic cut (n <= 2.5), and a blue-cloud cut. In cluster environments, the latter two methods suffer from serious limitations, and miss 31% and 51%, respectively, of visually identified disks, particularly the many red, bulge-dominated disk galaxies in clusters. (2) For moderately inclined disks, the three methods of disk selection, however, yield a similar global optical bar fraction (f bar-opt) of 34%+10% --3% (115/340), 31%+10% --3% (58/189), and 30%+10% --3% (72/241), respectively. (3) We explore f bar-opt as a function of host galaxy properties and find that it rises in brighter galaxies and those which appear to have no significant bulge component. Within a given absolute magnitude bin, f bar-opt is higher in visually selected disk galaxies that have no bulge as opposed to those with bulges. Conversely, for a given visual morphological class, f bar-opt rises at higher luminosities. Both results are similar to trends found in the field. (4) For bright early-types, as well as faint late-type systems with no evident bulge, the optical bar fraction in the Abell 901/2 clusters is comparable within a factor of 1.1-1.4 to that of field galaxies at lower redshifts (z < 0.04). (5) Between the core and the virial radius of the cluster (R~ 0.25-1.2 Mpc) at intermediate environmental densities (log(Sigma10) ~ 1.7-2.3), the optical bar fraction does not appear to depend strongly on the local environment density tracers (kappa, Sigma10, and intracluster medium (ICM) density), and varies at most by a factor of ~1.3. Inside the cluster core, we are limited by number statistics, projection effects, and different trends from different indicators, but overall f bar-opt does not show evidence for a variation larger than a factor of 1.5. We discuss the implications of our results for the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments.
    The Astrophysical Journal 04/2009; · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the properties of optically passive spirals and dusty red galaxies in the A901/2 cluster complex at redshift ~0.17 using rest-frame near-ultraviolet-optical spectral energy distributions, 24-mum infrared data and Hubble Space Telescope morphologies from the STAGES data set. The cluster sample is based on COMBO-17 redshifts with an rms precision of sigmacz ~ 2000kms-1. We find that `dusty red galaxies' and `optically passive spirals' in A901/2 are largely the same phenomenon, and that they form stars at a substantial rate, which is only four times lower than that in blue spirals at fixed mass. This star formation is more obscured than in blue galaxies and its optical signatures are weak. They appear predominantly in the stellar mass range of logM*/Msolar = [10, 11] where they constitute over half of the star-forming galaxies in the cluster; they are thus a vital ingredient for understanding the overall picture of star formation quenching in clusters. We find that the mean specific star formation rate (SFR) of star-forming galaxies in the cluster is clearly lower than in the field, in contrast to the specific SFR properties of blue galaxies alone, which appear similar in cluster and field. Such a rich red spiral population is best explained if quenching is a slow process and morphological transformation is delayed even more. At logM*/Msolar < 10, such galaxies are rare, suggesting that their quenching is fast and accompanied by morphological change. We note that edge-on spirals play a minor role; despite being dust reddened they form only a small fraction of spirals independent of environment.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 01/2009; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present an overview of the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES). STAGES is a multiwavelength project designed to probe physical drivers of galaxy evolution across a wide range of environments and luminosity. A complex multicluster system at z ~ 0.165 has been the subject of an 80-orbit F606W Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) mosaic covering the full span of the supercluster. Extensive multiwavelength observations with XMM-Newton, GALEX, Spitzer, 2dF, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the 17-band COMBO-17 photometric redshift survey complement the HST imaging. Our survey goals include simultaneously linking galaxy morphology with other observables such as age, star formation rate, nuclear activity and stellar mass. In addition, with the multiwavelength data set and new high-resolution mass maps from gravitational lensing, we are able to disentangle the large-scale structure of the system. By examining all aspects of an environment we will be able to evaluate the relative importance of the dark matter haloes, the local galaxy density and the hot X-ray gas in driving galaxy transformation. This paper describes the HST imaging, data reduction and creation of a master catalogue. We perform the Sérsic fitting on the HST images and conduct associated simulations to quantify completeness. In addition, we present the COMBO-17 photometric redshift catalogue and estimates of stellar masses and star formation rates for this field. We define galaxy and cluster sample selection criteria, which will be the basis for forthcoming science analyses, and present a compilation of notable objects in the field. Finally, we describe the further multiwavelength observations and announce public access to the data and catalogues.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 01/2009; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    Astronomy and Astrophysics 01/2009; 508:665-675. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We explore the amount of obscured star formation as a function of environment in the Abell 901/902 (A901/902) supercluster at z = 0.165 in conjunction with a field sample drawn from the A901 and CDFS fields, imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Space Telescope A901/902 Galaxy Evolution Survey and Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) Survey. We combine the COMBO-17 near-UV/optical SED with Spitzer 24 mu photometry to estimate both the unobscured and obscured star formation in galaxies with M * > 1010 M sun. We find that the star formation activity in massive galaxies is suppressed in dense environments, in agreement with previous studies. Yet, nearly 40% of the star-forming (SF) galaxies have red optical colors at intermediate and high densities. These red systems are not starbursting; they have star formation rates (SFRs) per unit stellar mass similar to or lower than blue SF galaxies. More than half of the red SF galaxies have low infrared-to-ultraviolet (IR-to-UV) luminosity ratios, relatively high Sérsic indices, and they are equally abundant at all densities. They might be gradually quenching their star formation, possibly but not necessarily under the influence of gas-removing environmental processes. The other gsim40% of the red SF galaxies have high IR-to-UV luminosity ratios, indicative of high dust obscuration. They have relatively high specific SFRs and are more abundant at intermediate densities. Our results indicate that while there is an overall suppression in the SF galaxy fraction with density, the small amount of star formation surviving the cluster environment is to a large extent obscured, suggesting that environmental interactions trigger a phase of obscured star formation, before complete quenching.
    The Astrophysical Journal 01/2009; · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Both observations and simulations show that major tidal interactions or mergers between gas-rich galaxies can lead to intense bursts of star formation. Yet, the average enhancement in star formation rate (SFR) in major mergers and the contribution of such events to the cosmic SFR are not well estimated. Here we use photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and UV SFRs from COMBO-17, 24 μm SFRs from Spitzer, and morphologies from two deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) cosmological survey fields (ECDFS/GEMS and A901/STAGES) to study the enhancement in SFR as a function of projected galaxy separation. We apply two-point projected correlation function techniques, which we augment with morphologically selected very close pairs (separation <2'') and merger remnants from the HST imaging. Our analysis confirms that the most intensely star-forming systems are indeed interacting or merging. Yet, for massive (M * >= 1010 M sun) star-forming galaxies at 0.4 < z < 0.8, we find that the SFRs of galaxies undergoing a major interaction (mass ratios <=1:4 and separations <=40 kpc) are only 1.80 ± 0.30 times higher than the SFRs of non-interacting galaxies when averaged over all interactions and all stages of the interaction, in good agreement with other observational works. Our results also agree with hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy interactions, which produce some mergers with large bursts of star formation on ~100 Myr timescales, but only a modest SFR enhancement when averaged over the entire merger timescale. We demonstrate that these results imply that only lsim10% of star formation at 0.4 <= z <= 0.8 is triggered directly by major mergers and interactions; these events are not important factors in the build-up of stellar mass since z = 1.
    The Astrophysical Journal 01/2009; · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We use the UKIRT (United Kingdom Infrared Telescope) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra-deep survey (UDS), currently the deepest panoramic near-infrared survey, together with deep Subaru optical imaging to measure the clustering, number counts and luminosity function of galaxies at z∼ 2 selected using the BzK selection technique. We find that both star-forming (sBzK) and passive (pBzK) galaxies, to a magnitude limit of KAB < 23, are strongly clustered. The passive galaxies are the most strongly clustered population, with scalelengths of r0= 15.0+1.9−2.2 h−1 Mpc compared with r0= 6.75+0.34−0.37 h−1 Mpc for star-forming galaxies. The direct implication is that passive galaxies inhabit the most massive dark matter haloes, and are thus identified as the progenitors of the most massive galaxies at the present day. In addition, the pBzKs exhibit a sharp flattening and potential turnover in their number counts, in agreement with other recent studies. This plateau cannot be explained by the effects of incompleteness. We conclude that only very massive galaxies are undergoing passive evolution at this early epoch, consistent with the downsizing scenario for galaxy evolution. Assuming a purely passive evolution for the pBzKs from their median redshift to the present day, their luminosity function suggests that only ∼2.5 per cent of present-day massive ellipticals had a pBzK as a main progenitor.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 11/2008; 391(3):1301 - 1307. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a study of galaxies in the STAGES survey of the Abell 901/902 supercluster at z˜0.165, based on HST/ACS F606W, COMBO-17, Spitzer 24 mum, XMM-Newton X-ray, and gravitational lensing maps. We characterize galaxies with strong, externally-triggered morphological distortions and normal, relatively undisturbed galaxies, using visual classification and quantitative CAS parameters. We compare normal and distorted galaxies in terms of their frequency, distribution within the cluster, star formation properties, and relationship to dark matter or surface mass density, and intra-cluster medium density. We report here our preliminary results.
    Funes, J. G. ; Corsini, E. M.: Formation and Evolution of Galaxy Disks, ASP, 269-271 (2008). 10/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: In dense clusters, higher densities at early epochs as well as physical processes, such as ram pressure stripping and tidal interactions become important, and can have direct consequences for the evolution of bars and their host disks. To study bars and disks as a function of environment, we are using the STAGES ACS HST survey of the Abell 901/902 supercluster (zËœ~0.165), along with earlier field studies based the SDSS and the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey (OSUBSGS). We explore the limitations of traditional methods for characterizing the bar fraction, and in particular highlight uncertainties in disk galaxy selection in cluster environments. We present an alternative approach for exploring the proportion of bars, and investigate the properties of bars as a function of host galaxy color, Sérsic index, stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), specific SFR, and morphology.
    Frebel, Anna; Maund, Justyn R.; Shen, Juntei ; Siegel, Michael H.: New Horizons in Astronomy: Frank N. Bash Symposium 2007, ASP, 231-234 (2008). 03/2008;

Publication Stats

415 Citations
97.83 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011
    • Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
      • Departamento de Física Teórica
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2006–2011
    • University of Nottingham
      • School of Physics and Astronomy
      Nottingham, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2009
    • Max Planck Institute for Astronomy
      Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • University of Innsbruck
      • Institute for Astro-and Particle Physics
      Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria