Gurel Pekkan

Dumlupinar Üniversitesi, Dumlupınar, Kütahya, Turkey

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Publications (23)24.36 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To analyze the torque application on prosthetic abutment screws using different maintenance times, to determine an influence on the removal torque values. A total of 40 external hexagon implants, 40 titanium screws, and 40 customized abutments were used. In group 1, the screws received a torque of 30 N·cm by instant torque application; in groups 2, 3, and 4, torque of 30 N·cm was applied and maintained for 10, 20, and 30 seconds, respectively. Removal torque was performed 10 minutes after torque application. Data were statistically analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). The mean and standard deviation (±SD) of removal torque values found were 11.61 ± 1.43 N·cm for group 1; 18.64 ± 1.71 N·cm for group 2; 21.62 ± 0.97 N·cm for group 3; and 21.48 ± 1.55 N·cm for group 4. Groups 3 and 4 exhibited statistically higher values than group 2, which demonstrated significantly higher values than group 1 (P < 0.05). A torque of 30 N·cm applied for 20 seconds seemed to be the best option when considering the removal torque values of external hexagon implants.
    Implant dentistry 08/2013; · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    Mutlu Ozcan, Gurel Pekkan, Ashkan Khan
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: This study evaluated whether air blasting or rinsing particle remnants with water would impair adhesion of resin composite to metal. Materials and Methods: Commercially pure titanium plates (1 mm x 25 mm x 50 mm) were wet polished down to 1200-grit silicone carbide abrasive and ultrasonically cleaned. They were then embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic with the bonding surfaces exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following particle deposition protocols (N = 60, n = 10 per group): group 1: particle deposition with aluminum trioxide (50 µm Al2O3) (AL) + air blasting + silane (ESPE-Sil); group 2: particle deposition with 30 µm SiO2 (CoJet) (CSC) + air blasting + silane; group 3: particle deposition with Rocatec Pre 110 µm Al2O3+Rocatec Plus 110 µm SiO2 (LSC) + air blasting + silane. In groups 4 (AL-W), 5 (CSC-W) and 6 (LSC-W), the same protocols were used, but instead of air blasting only, particle-deposited specimen surfaces were rinsed with water and air blasted. Adhesive resin (VisioBond) was applied and resin composite (Quadrant Posterior, Cavex) was bonded using polyethylene molds and photopolymerized. The specimens were then submitted to thermocycling (6000 cycles, 5°C-55°C, dwell time: 30 s, transfer time: 5 s). Pre-test failures during thermocycling were assigned a value of 0 MPa. Failure modes were identified using an optical microscope. SEM images of particles were obtained. Bond strength data (MPa) were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (a = 0.05). Results: Particle type significantly affected the bond results (p < 0.001). AL groups presented significantly lower results (air blasting: 4.3 ± 3.3, rinsing: 11.8 ± 6.5) compared to those of CSC (air blasting: 27.7 ± 6.6, rinsing: 30.4 ± 9.3) and LSC (air blasting: 31.4 ± 8.7, rinsing: 28.7 ± 7.0). AL groups presented 5 spontaneous debondings during thermocycling in the air-blasted group. Rinsing with water as opposed to air blasting only did not decrease the results with any of the particle types (p > 0.05). While AL groups showed exclusively adhesive failure between the resin composite and the substrate, the incidence of cohesive failures in the composite was more frequent in groups CSC and LSC after either air blasting or rinsing. SEM images of particles showed sharp morphology of the particles in AL compared to CSC and LSC. Conclusion: Rinsing and air blasting following particle deposition methods did not impair adhesion of resin composite to titanium. Particle deposition with silica particles provided better adhesion of resin composite to this substrate compared to the use of alumina particles.
    The journal of adhesive dentistry 07/2013; · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning protocols on the repair strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex, simulating the clinical chipping phenomenon. Materials and Methods: Forty disk-shaped zirconia core (Lava Zirconia, 3M ESPE) (diameter: 3 mm) specimens were veneered circumferentially with a feldspathic veneering ceramic (VM7, Vita Zahnfabrik) (thickness: 2 mm) using a split metal mold. They were then embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic with the bonding surfaces exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning protocols (n = 10 per group): group 1, veneer: 4% hydrofluoric acid (HF) (Porcelain Etch) + core: aluminum trioxide (50-µm Al2O3) + core + veneer: silane (ESPE-Sil); group 2: core: Al2O3 (50 µm) + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane; group 3: veneer: HF + core: 30 µm aluminum trioxide particles coated with silica (30 µm SiO2) + core + veneer: silane; group 4: core: 30 µm SiO2 + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane. Core and veneer ceramic were conditioned individually but no attempt was made to avoid cross contamination of conditioning, simulating the clinical intraoral repair situation. Adhesive resin (VisioBond) was applied to both the core and the veneer ceramic, and resin composite (Quadrant Posterior) was bonded onto both substrates using polyethylene molds and photopolymerized. After thermocycling (6000 cycles, 5°C-55°C), the specimens were subjected to shear bond testing using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure modes were identified using an optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope images were obtained. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed statistically using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Bonferroni Holm correction (α = 0.05). Results: Group 3 demonstrated significantly higher values (MPa) (8.6 ± 2.7) than those of the other groups (3.2 ± 3.1, 3.2 ± 3, and 3.1 ± 3.5 for groups 1, 2, and 4, respectively) (p < 0.001). All groups showed exclusively adhesive failure between the repair resin and the core zirconia. The incidence of cohesive failure in the ceramic was highest in group 3 (8 out of 10) compared to the other groups (0/10, 2/10, and 2/10, in groups 1, 2, and 4, respectively). SEM images showed that air abrasion on the zirconia core only also impinged on the veneering ceramic where the etching pattern was affected. Conclusion: Etching the veneer ceramic with HF gel and silica coating of the zirconia core followed by silanization of both substrates could be advised for the repair of the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex.
    The journal of adhesive dentistry 05/2013; · 0.91 Impact Factor
  • S Saridag, M Sevimay, G Pekkan
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    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY Fracture resistance of inlays and onlays may be influenced by the quantity of the dental structure removed and the restorative materials used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of two different cavity preparation designs and all-ceramic restorative materials on the fracture resistance of the tooth-restoration complex. Fifty mandibular third molar teeth were randomly divided into the following five groups: group 1: intact teeth (control); group 2: inlay preparations, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein); group 3: inlay preparations, zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkon, Zirkonzahn SRL, Gais, Italy); group 4: onlay preparations, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press); and group 5: onlay preparations, zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkon). The inlay and onlay restorations were adhesively cemented with dual polymerizing resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent AG). After thermal cycling (5° to 55°C × 5000 cycles), specimens were subjected to a compressive load until fracture at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. The fracture strength values were significantly higher in the inlay group (2646.7 ± 360.4) restored with lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic than those of the onlay group (1673.6 ± 677) restored with lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic. The fracture strength values of teeth restored with inlays using zirconia ceramic (2849 ± 328) and onlays with zirconia ceramic (2796.3 ± 337.3) were similar to those of the intact teeth (2905.3 ± 398.8). In the IPS e.max Press groups, as the preparation amount was increased (from inlay to onlay preparation), the fracture resistance was decreased. In the ICE Zirkon ceramic groups, the preparation type did not affect the fracture resistance results.
    Operative Dentistry 02/2013; · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the effect of intermediate adhesive resin application (IAR) on tensile bond strength (TBS) for early composite repairs in situations where substrate and repair composite bonded together were once of the same kind with the substrate (similar) and once other than the substrate material (dissimilar). Specimens from three types of composites (TPH Spectrum (TPH), Charisma (CHA) and Filtek Z250 (Z250) were fabricated. The specimens in each composite group (n=72) were randomly divided into 6 subgroups (n=12). In each composite group, the similar and two dissimilar composites were bonded onto the substrates once using an IAR (Adper Single Bond Plus) and once without. After water storage for 1 week at 37 °C, substrate-adherent combinations were submitted to tensile test. Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). The substrate-adherent combination (p=0.0001), adherent (repair) composite (p=0.0001), and application of IAR (p=0.0001) significantly affected the results. Utilization of IAR improved the repair bond strength for all composite combinations.
    International Journal of Adhesion and Adhesives 01/2013; · 2.22 Impact Factor
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    M Ozcan, G Pekkan
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration: four seconds in circular motion). After conditioning protocols, the repair resin was adhered to the substrate surfaces using transparent polyethylene molds (diameter: 3.6 mm) incrementally and photo-polymerized. The substrate-adherend combinations were as follows: AS-AS, G-G, AS-G. Shear force was applied to the adhesive interface in a Universal Testing Machine (crosshead speed: 1 mm/min). The types of failures were further evaluated and categorized as follows: 1) cohesive in the composite substrate and 2) adhesive at the interface. Bond strength values (MPa) were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and least significant difference post hoc tests (α=0.05). Significant effects of the adhesion strategy (p=0.006) and the composite type (p=0.000) were found. Interaction terms were not significant (p=0.292). Regardless of the substrate-adherend combination, protocol 1 (17-22 MPa) showed significantly higher results than did protocols 2 (15-17 MPa) and 3 (11-17 MPa) (p=0.028, p=0.002, respectively). The highest results were obtained from the G-G combination after all three protocols (17-22 MPa). The incidence of cohesive failures was more common when the substrate and the adherend were the same composite type (AS-AS: 87.5%, 87.5%, 75%; G-G: 100%, 75%, 50% for protocols 1, 2, and 3, respectively). When substrate and adherend were used interchangeably, adhesive failures were more frequent (25%, 50%, and 100% for protocol 1, 2, and 3, respectively). When the substrate and the adherend are of the same type, greater repair strength could be expected. In the repair of composites next to the dentin, depending on the composite type, conditioning the composite with silica coating and silanization after etching the dentin adds to the repair strength compared to the results obtained with silane application only.
    Operative Dentistry 07/2012; · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    Gurel Pekkan, Mutlu Ozcan
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disk specimens 6 mm in diameter and 1 mm thick (N = 220, n = 10) were prepared from the following restorative materials: · eight shades of nanofilled composite (Aelite Aesthetic Enamel), · seven shades of nanohybrid composite (Grandio Universal), · six shades of photopolymerized polyacid modified compomer (Glasiosite), and · one shade of hybrid composite (X-tra fil U). Human canine dentin (n = 10), bovine enamel (n = 10), and an aluminum (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted, and equivalent Al thickness (eq Al) values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The data were analyzed using a non-parametric one-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis), and multiple comparisons were made with a Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test (a = 0.05). Different shades of resin-based restorative materials tested did not reveal statistically significant differences within each material group (p > 0.05). Radiopacity values of the resin-based restorative materials investigated varied depending on their types; however, within different shades of one material type, radiopacity values were comparable. Every shade of nanocomposite material other than Aelite Aesthetic Enamel Incisal LT Gray showed comparable radiopacity to human dentin. Other materials tested demonstrated higher radiopacity compared to human dentin and bovine enamel.
    General dentistry 07/2012; 60(4):e237-43.
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    ABSTRACT: Background/purposeIn the most recent decade, the use of all-ceramic and fiber-reinforced composites as inlay-retained fixed partial dentures has increased. There are limited studies of comparisons of the mechanical strength and bending of these restorations. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture strength and the amount of bending in all-ceramic and fiber-reinforced composite inlay-retained fixed partial dentures.Materials and methodsForty mandibular premolars and 40 mandibular molars were collected. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 10 molars and premolars within each group, each with box-shaped proximal preparations. Two different all-ceramic systems (IPS e.max Press and ICE Zirkon) and two different fiber-reinforced composite systems (EverStick and Vectris) with a connector size of 16 mm2 were used to restore prepared abutment teeth. After thermal cycling (5 and 55°C × 5000), a vertical force was loaded to the center of the inlay-retained fixed partial dentures at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Failure types of specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and radiography. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Mann-Whitney-U tests (α = 0.05).ResultsFracture strengths were significantly higher in the ICE Zirkon (1540 N) and EverStick specimens (1057 N) than in the Vectris (794 N) and IPS e.max Press specimens (606 N) (P < 0.001). The amount of bending was significantly greater in the EverStick (1.94 mm) and Vectris (1.87 mm) specimens than in the ICE Zirkon (1.07 mm) and IPS e.max Press specimens (1.18 mm) (P < 0.001).Conclusions Zirconia-based ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated the highest fracture strength. The fiber-reinforced composite inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated higher bending values than did the all-ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures.
    Journal of Dental Sciences. 06/2012; 7(2):159–164.
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    Mutlu Özcan, Winand Koekoek, Gurel Pekkan
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    ABSTRACT: The load-bearing capacity and failure types of indirect inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDP), made of particulate filler composite (PFC) (Estenia) alone or reinforced with E-glass fibers impregnated with various monomers were evaluated. Indirect inlay-retained FDPs were made between first premolars and first molars (N=30, 10/per group). The inlay parts of the specimens were silica coated and silanized and the specimens were cemented with dual-polymerized resin cement under ultrasonic vibrations. The experimental groups were as follows: Group 1: FRC1 (BR-100, UTMA) + PFC; Group 2: FRC2 (everStick C&B, Bis-GMA/PMMA) + PFC; Group 3: PFC only. The specimens were kept in distilled water at 37 °C for one month and then subjected to fracture strength test. No significant difference was found between the Group 1 and Group 2 FDPs (1357±301 N and 1213±316 N, respectively) (p>0.05) (ANOVA). Group 3 (856±299 N) showed significantly lower results than those of FRC reinforced groups (p<0.05). Failure analyses revealed no debonding of any of the FDPs from the inlay cavities. FDPs made of PFC only showed mainly catastrophic fracture of the pontic. In the FRC reinforced groups, predominantly delamination of the veneering was observed. The use of silica coating and silanization in combination with the dual-polymerized resin cement used; under ultrasonic cementation procedure provided sufficient adhesion to withstand static loading forces at the cementation interface, since the failures were predominantly delamination of the veneering in the FRC reinforced groups.
    Journal of the mechanical behavior of biomedical materials. 03/2012; 12:160-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Ceramics should be radiopaque enough to be seen on radiographs and to be distinguishable from tooth structures. Information on the radiopacity of different ceramics used in restorative dentistry is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the radiopacity of ceramics in comparison with human and bovine dental hard tissues and metals. A total of 128 disk-shaped specimens, 6 × 1 mm (n=8), were prepared from dental ceramic materials and metals. The optical densities of each material, along with 2 tooth sections (canine and molar teeth), bovine dentin and enamel specimens, and 2 different aluminum step wedges, were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. The optical densities of the specimens were used to determine the equivalent aluminum thicknesses. The data were analyzed by nonparametric 1-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple range tests for post hoc comparison (α=.05). Among ceramic materials, Cercon Zirconia had the highest and the Cergo Pressable Ceramic had the lowest radiopacity values. Cergo Pressable Ceramic, Noritake Super Porcelain EX3 dentin, IPS Empress e.max Press, Cercon Kiss dentin, IPS Empress 2, Cercon Ceram dentin, bovine dentin, human canine, and molar tooth dentin radiopacity measurements were not significantly different. The radiopacity measurements of In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Spinell, Celay Alumina, Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), Celay Zirconia, In-Ceram Zirconia, NiCr alloy, Wieland Zirconia, Cercon Zirconia, and 22-carat gold were significantly higher than that of bovine enamel (P<.05). Significant differences in radiopacity were found among ceramic materials, when compared to metals, bovine enamel and human and bovine dentin. Cercon and Wieland Zirconia had high radiopacity values, which were similar to metals.
    The Journal of prosthetic dentistry 08/2011; 106(2):109-17. · 1.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the relationship between dental anxiety, general anxiety and depression levels in patients attending a university hospital dental clinic in Turkey. A cross sectional study. 250 first visit patients seeking dental treatment. Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to assess the dental anxiety, general anxiety and depression level in these patients. The mean MDAS, BAI, and BDI scores were 10.5, 9.4, and 10.7, respectively. The prevalence of dental anxiety was found to be 20.8% (52/250) at the cut-off point > or = 15 and 6.8% (17/250) at the cut-off point > or = 19 according to MDAS score evaluation. MDAS and BAI scores were significantly higher in women (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively). BDI and BAI scores were significantly higher in MDAS cut-off point of 15 (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). When the cut-off point was taken as 19, age and BAI scores were significantly higher in MDAS > or = 19 (p < 0.05, p < 0.001 and p = 0.477, respectively) but there was no association with BDI. There was significant correlation between MDAS scores and age, BDI and BAI mean scores (r = - 0.166, p < 0.01; r = 0.148, p < 0.05; r = 0.273, p < 0.01 respectively). Dental anxiety was positively correlated with patients' general anxiety level and was higher in women and at younger age.
    Community dental health 06/2011; 28(2):149-53. · 0.93 Impact Factor
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    Gurel Pekkan, Alper Aktas, Keriman Pekkan
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the radiopacity of bone graft materials (BGMs) in comparison with bovine mandibular cortical bone and human dentine. Eight samples of each material (8 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were prepared from Dexabone(®) (DB), Bio - Oss(®) (BO), 4BONE SBS (4B), KASIOS(®) TCP (KA), S.C. PONETI (PO), and Apatite-Wollastonite (AW). The optical densities of each material, along with one tooth section (human canine tooth 1 mm slice), bovine mandibular cortical bone (BC) samples, and an aluminum step wedge, were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. The data were analyzed by nonparametric one-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis) and Duncan's multiple range tests for post hoc comparison (α = 0.05). BC and AW had statistically lower optical density values than BO, 4B and human dentine (p < 0.05). Among BGMs, AW (3.681 ± 0.409 mm eq Al) had the highest radiopacity values whereas BO (1.925 ± 0.176 mm eq Al) had the lowest one. The radiopacity values of DB and KA did not reveal a statistically significant difference when compared with other materials (p > 0.05). The radiopacity of all BGMs investigated seemed to be too low to be detected radiographically when placed in the mandibular cortical bone.
    Journal of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery: official publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 02/2011; 40(1):e1-4. · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • Fatih Oghan, Gurel Pekkan, Olcay Ozveren
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    ABSTRACT: Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic granulomatous inflammatory bowel disease which may also involve the extraintestinal organs such as joints, liver, skin and perianal tissue. Involvement of the nasal cavity is quite rare in CD. This case report presents a 28-year-old girl with CD and saddle nose deformity, alar collapse and palatal perforation as extraintestinal manifestations of the disease in addition to persistent truncus arteriosus-type 4.
    Journal of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery: official publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 02/2011; 40(1):17-9. · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • G Pekkan, S H Tuna, F Oghan
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate extraoral prostheses and the use of extraoral implants in patients with facial defects. 10 cases were treated utilizing maxillofacial prostheses employing extraoral implants in five cases. 16 extraoral implants were installed. Seven implants were placed in irradiated sites in the orbital regions. Six implants were placed in mastoid regions and three in a zygoma region that was irradiated. Two implants failed before initial integration was achieved in irradiated areas. Using 14 extraoral implants as anchors, five extraoral prostheses were set. The other five cases were treated with extraoral prostheses without using extraoral implants due to cost and patient-related factors. The data included age, sex, primary disease, implant length, implant failure, prosthetic attachment, radiation therapy, and peri-implant skin reactions. The use of extraoral implants for the retention of extraoral prostheses has simplified the placement, removal, and cleaning of the prosthesis by the patient. The stability of the prostheses was improved by anchors. Clinical and technical problems are presented with the techniques used for their resolution. Using extraoral implants resulted in a high rate of success in retaining facial prostheses and gave good stability and aesthetic satisfaction.
    International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 01/2011; 40(4):378-83. · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Systemic illnesses have an important role in dental clinics. Taking a detailed medical history in dental clinics is crucial in the primary evaluation of the patients. Some clinical manifestations and information of any complaints are able to change the treatment modalities from certain patients. The purpose of study is determining the medical profile of patients seeking treatment at the Dental Clinic Dumlupinar University Kutahya/Turkey. Methods: Medical histories of 1000 (508 female 492 male) consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated. Demographic data, medical status, habits, complaints, sequence of essential medical precautions and carefulness of patients to written forms were analyzed. Results: Our study population showed a rate % 43.7 with medical problems. The number of patients presented more than one systemic disease were % 11.6 (69 female, 47 male). Patients in need of a medical consultation were % 8.2 (62 female, 20 male). The most prevalent diseases were hypertension, thyroid disorders, respiratory problems and kidney diseases. Conclusions: This study showed a high frequency of reported medical condition among dental patients. Dental health professionals should be related with a patient's medical status, and obtain any necessary consultation before making any therapeutic decision. Noteworthy lacks were observed in written self-reported medical histories . Our decision is written medical history forms should be supported with the interview method.
    AADR Annual Meeting 2010; 03/2010
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    ABSTRACT: Pharyngeal obturator prostheses restore the congenital or acquired defects of the soft palate and allow adequate closure of palatopharyngeal sphincter. Two patients with soft palate defect and subsequent velopharyngeal insufficiency were rehabilitated using pharyngeal obturator prostheses which had different retention mechanisms. Since it is necessary for swallowing and intelligible speech, the patients were examined in terms of adequate velopharyngeal closure after prosthetic treatment. The results were satisfying for both the patients and physicians.
    European journal of dentistry. 01/2010; 4(1):81-7.
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    ABSTRACT: This case report presents a patient with tardive dyskinesia who also suffered from masticatory muscle pain and temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis. The patient was treated with clozapine in gradually increasing doses and two injections of botulinum toxin type A one year apart. Involuntary movements of mandibular clenching and bruxing disappeared and pain was relieved to a great extent. Reappearances of dyskinetic movements and pain were observed during the follow-up period of 1.5 years.
    Journal of orofacial pain 01/2010; 24(2):212-6. · 2.39 Impact Factor
  • Gurel Pekkan, Canan Hekimoglu
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    ABSTRACT: The applications of dual-polymerizing resin cements for all-ceramic restorations have considerably increased. For a successful clinical outcome, the luting agent should have high bond strength, not only to the ceramic surface, but also to the tooth surface. The purpose of this study was to examine shear (S) and tensile (T) bond strengths between 2 all-ceramic systems and human dentin using 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements. The buccal surfaces of 120 freshly extracted human third molars were ground flat, parallel to the long axis. Sixty specimens were prepared from each of 2 all-ceramic systems (IPS Empress 2 (E) and Cergo Pressable Ceramic (C)). Twenty specimens were luted with each of the following resin cements: Nexus 2 (N) with Self-Etch Primer, Duo-Link (D), and Variolink II (V), with their respective bonding systems. All specimens were immersed in water at 37 degrees C for 1 week, before being thermal cycled for 500 cycles in 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C water. Shear (S) and tensile (T) bond strength tests were applied to 10 specimens from each group. Fractured surfaces were inspected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric 1-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis) followed by Duncan's multiple range tests for post hoc comparison and Mann-Whitney U test for 2 ceramic systems (alpha=.05). Significant differences were observed in shear and tensile bond strength values of the adhesive systems used (P<.05). Duo-Link showed the highest mean bond strength values, whereas Nexus 2 revealed lower shear and tensile bond strength values. Fracture modes were hybrid at the dentin interface and/or cohesive in dentin. Cementing agents/adhesive systems may influence the bond to dental hard tissues. Dual-polymerizing activators may have a negative effect on polymerization of the bonding agent.
    The Journal of prosthetic dentistry 10/2009; 102(4):242-52. · 1.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the audiological status of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients with otological symptoms and to make comparisons with that of a control group of subjects without TMD and otological symptoms. 25 TMD patients with otological symptoms and 20 age and gender matched controls, 45 subjects in total, were included in the study. All subjects underwent a series of audiological tests that included pure-tone audiometry, impedance test and reflex tympanometry. The audiological parameters recorded in the two groups were compared statistically by means of unpaired t tests and corrected according to Bonferroni in the case of repeated tests. The pure-tone thresholds at frequencies 125, 250, 500Hz, and 6kHz showed significant differences between the TMD patients and control subjects after the Bonferroni correction (p<0.007). Compliance peaks demonstrated significant differences when the TMD and control groups were compared (p<0.05). The findings indicate that TMD patients with otological complaints have hearing impairment at low frequencies and also perhaps, at high frequencies.
    Journal of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery: official publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 08/2009; 38(3):231-4. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prosthetic rehabilitation of an edentulous cleft lip and palate patient with a combined hard and soft palate defect is a great challenge, due to the lack of retention of the obturator prosthesis as a result of its weight and the inability to obtain a border seal. Dental implants improve the retention, stability, and occlusal function of prostheses when used in carefully selected cleft lip and palate cases. This clinical report presents an edentulous unilateral cleft lip and palate patient who has hard and soft palate defects and an atrophied maxilla, treated with an implant-supported speech-aid prosthesis.
    The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal 02/2009; 46(1):97-102. · 1.24 Impact Factor