Paul Greene

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, United States

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Publications (21)40.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Colorectal cancer is a common disease, and incidence and death rates are higher in medically underserved populations. The colorectal cancer death rate in Arkansas exceeds the national rate. The objective of this study was to examine population characteristics relevant to the design and implementation of a state-sponsored colorectal cancer screening program that is responsive to medically underserved populations. Trained interviewers in 2006 conducted a random-digit-dialed telephone survey comprising items selected from the Health Information National Trends Survey to characterize demographic factors, health care variables, and colorectal screening history in a sample (n = 2,021) representative of the Arkansas population. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified associations among population characteristics and screening status. Participants who were aged 50 to 64, who did not have health insurance, or who had an annual household income of $15,000 or less were significantly less likely than their counterparts to be in compliance with screening guidelines. Those who reported having a health care provider, having 5 or more health care visits during the past year, and receiving physician advice for colorectal screening were more likely to be in compliance with screening guidelines. Although a larger percentage of white participants were in compliance with screening guidelines, blacks had higher screening rates than whites when we controlled for screening advice. Survey results informed efforts to decrease disparities in colorectal cancer screening in Arkansas. Efforts should focus on reimbursing providers and patients for screening costs, encouraging the use of physicians as a point of entry to screening programs, and promoting a balanced approach (ie, multiple options) to screening recommendations. Our methods established a model for developing screening programs for medically underserved populations.
    Preventing chronic disease 01/2012; 9:E138. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Arkansas Cancer Connection Program is a community-academic partnership between the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and nine community-based coalitions designed to address cancer health disparities through community-based participatory research. In 2005, a survey measuring coalition capacity was administered to 51 Cancer Council members to assess training needs and increase coalition capacity. The highest scoring components were leadership and member engagement while the lowest were development and capacity effectiveness. Effectiveness correlated with aspects of coalition capacity. The evaluation identified training needs, which were met by projects leveraging the coalition's strengths to advance community-based participatory research addressing cancer disparities.
    Journal of Cancer Education 06/2011; 26(4):658-63. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Disparities in breast cancer survival rates suggest that biological processes contribute. Translational research addressing health disparities would benefit from using a community-based participatory approach (CBPR) to examine biological processes commonly seen as the proximal causes of illness as well as behavioral and social-ecological "causes of the causes" within an integrated conceptual framework. This paper describes a CBPR study that explored perceptions regarding breast cancer relevant behaviors, and the application of the study's results to develop translational research. Data from eight focus groups of African American (n = 29) and Caucasian women (n = 27) were analyzed, using the framework of the social-ecological model. Nutrition and physical activity were valued over screening and research participation. Treatment of illness was emphasized over prevention. Women's perspectives are presented within a framework that facilitated the collaborative development of translational research to examine associations among biological, behavioral, and societal processes contributing to disparities.
    Translational behavioral medicine. 06/2011; 1(2):224-33.
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    ABSTRACT: The death rate from colorectal cancer is high and affects poor and medically underserved populations disproportionately. In the United States, health disparities are particularly acute in the Lower Mississippi River Delta region. Because many in the region have limited access to basic health care resources, they are not screened for cancer, even though screening is one of the most effective strategies to prevent colorectal cancer. Community-based participatory research is a promising approach to prevent colorectal cancer in this population. The Empowering Communities for Life program was implemented in 2 underserved counties in the Arkansas Lower Mississippi River Delta. The program arose from a 9-year partnership between the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and 9 cancer councils across Arkansas. Empowering Communities for Life is a community-based participatory intervention designed to increase colorectal cancer screening in rural, underserved communities through fecal occult blood testing. Community and academic partners collaborated to develop research infrastructure, intervention materials and methods, and the assessment instrument. Project outcomes were strengthened community-academic partnerships, certification of community partners in conducting human subjects research, development of a randomized controlled design to test the intervention's efficacy, an interactive PowerPoint presentation, an informational pamphlet, the certification of 6 lay health advisors and 22 role models to provide the intervention, and an assessment tool using an audience response system. Lessons learned in working collaboratively with diverse groups include the importance of meeting face to face and listening.
    Preventing chronic disease 03/2011; 8(2):A47. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates in Arkansas exceed national averages and can be reduced through systematic screening that either identifies precursor lesions that can be removed before cancer develops, or diagnoses cancer at an early stage when it is most responsive to treatment. Results of a survey assessing screening status of Arkansas residents and dimensions of health care supporting colorectal screening indicate that primary care providers can play an important role in efforts to decrease the burden of colorectal cancer by informing patients about risk factors and providing advice about the full range of screening options.
    The Journal of the Arkansas Medical Society 09/2009; 106(3):66-8.
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    ABSTRACT: We sought to determine whether adding motivational interviewing to a behavioral weight control program improves weight loss outcomes and glycemic control for overweight women with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a randomized, controlled, clinical trial in which participants all received an 18-month, group-based behavioral obesity treatment and were randomized to individual sessions of motivational interviewing or attention control (total of five sessions) as an adjunct to the weight control program. Overweight women with type 2 diabetes treated by oral medications who could walk for exercise were eligible. Primary outcomes were weight and A1C, assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months. A total of 217 overweight women (38% African American) were randomized (93% retention rate). Women in motivational interviewing lost significantly more weight at 6 months (P = 0.01) and 18 months (P = 0.04). Increased weight losses with motivational interviewing were mediated by enhanced adherence to the behavioral weight control program. African-American women lost less weight than white women overall and appeared to have a diminished benefit from the addition of motivational interviewing. Significantly greater A1C reductions were observed in those undergoing motivational interviewing at 6 months (P = 0.02) but not at 18 months. Motivational interviewing can be a beneficial adjunct to behavioral obesity treatment for women with type 2 diabetes, although the benefits may not be sustained among African-American women.
    Diabetes care 06/2007; 30(5):1081-7. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The origin of cancer health disparities and mortality in Arkansas is multifactorial. In response to a cooperative agreement with the National Cancer Institute's Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities, the Arkansas Special Populations Access Network (ASPAN) was developed to reduce these disparities. ASPAN's partnership with local primary care physicians of the Arkansas Medical, Dental, and Pharmaceutical Association through the Cancer Education Awareness Program is the focus of this article. A quasi-experimental intervention, the Community Cancer Education Awareness Program, was employed that included 1) physician education to increase awareness of risk factors and cancer screening; and 2) patient education to increase screening, and 3) patient-generated screening questionnaires to prompt discussion of cancer risk and screening recommendations between patients and physicians. Two urban and 2 rural clinics were targeted during a 12-month period with interval intervention assessments. Baseline review of records (n = 200) from patients >/=40 were utilized to assess the rate of breast, prostate, and colorectal screenings among clinics. For the patient education intervention, patients (n = 120) were interviewed via a 34-item assessment. Physician awareness of cancer risk factors and screening recommendations significantly increased. Statistically significant increases were seen for prostate (P = .028), breast (P = .036), and colorectal (P < .001) cancer screening across all 4 clinics. Patients' increased likelihood of cancer screenings was associated with knowledge about consumption of animal fat (P < .001), dietary fiber (P < .013), and mammograms (P < .001). Utilizing the physician as the central change agent, the ASPAN provider network successfully enhanced cancer screening awareness of minority physicians and their patients. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 11/2006; 107(8 Suppl):2052-60. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Few studies have investigated community clinic-based interventions to promote mammography screening among rural African American women. This study randomized older low-income rural African American women who had not participated in screening in the previous 2 years to a theory-based, personalized letter or usual care; no group differences in mammography rate were evident at 6-month follow-up. Women who had not obtained a mammogram were then randomized to a tailored call delivered by community health care workers or a tailored letter. There were no group differences in mammography rates after the second 6-month follow-up. However, among women who had never had a mammogram, the tailored call was more effective in promoting mammography use. Tailored counseling may be an effective screening promotion strategy for hard-to-reach rural African American women with no history of screening. Further research into this strategy may facilitate efforts to reduce health disparities in underserved low-income rural African American populations.
    Health Education &amp Behavior 09/2004; 31(4 Suppl):29S-44S. · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Women with a family history of breast cancer are at increased risk for developing cancer and, therefore, might be expected to engage in early detection practices more actively than women without a family history. Alternatively, women with a family history may avoid thinking about cancer and have attitudes and practices that do not promote early detection. This study examined breast cancer attitudes and practices among African American women aged >or=50 who had not had a mammogram in the last 2 years. Phone survey data from 320 female clients of low-income, rural primary care clinics (91% African American) indicated that 15% self-reported a family history of breast cancer (FH(+)). Half of the FH(+) women did not know their relative risk of developing breast cancer. Of those providing a risk estimate, 67% perceived themselves at low risk compared with other women their age. Perceived relative risk was comparable between FH(+) and FH(-) women. Further, FH(+) women did not indicate greater worry about breast cancer, nor did they have more accurate knowledge of mammography recommendations than FH(-) women. Two thirds of FH(+) women had never had a mammogram. Monthly breast self-examination did not differ between FH(+) and FH(-) women. Thus, neither knowledge of a positive family history nor perceived relative risk of breast cancer was associated with either increased or decreased early detection practices among these low-income, rural, African American women who have underused mammography. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of FH(+) women had not ever participated in screening mammography. Interventions to increase mammography rates in this population of underusers are indicated.
    Journal of Women s Health 10/2003; 12(8):779-87. · 1.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Relative risks computed from known breast cancer risk factors can be used to quantitate a woman's individual risk of developing breast cancer. However, among older women the absolute risk of developing breast cancer over a specified time interval may be more useful in risk-benefit counseling. The objective of this investigation is to characterize the relationships between relative risks and absolute risks of breast cancer among a population of rural, older African American women. Among 224 African American women aged 50–91 years, relative risks were computed from historical information on age at menarche, number of previous biopsies, age at first birth, and number of first-degree relatives with breast cancer. These estimates, combined with the woman's current age, average remaining life expectancy, age-specific mortality, and breast cancer incidence rates, were used to estimate lifetime probabilities of developing breast cancer. Most women in the cohort (72.8%) had weak relative risks of 1.01–1.5 and only 3.5% of the women had relative risks of greater than 3.0. The majority of the women (87.5%) had lifetime probabilities of developing breast cancer that were less than 5%. Although there is a marked increase in age-specific breast cancer incidence with age, the probability of developing breast cancer in this population is low, primarily due to the low relative risks and the effects of competing mortality at older ages. Screening mammography should be directed toward women with high risks who are not receiving regular screening mammograms.
    The Breast Journal 10/1999; 5(6):364 - 368. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer screening rates are particularly low among poor, minority, and rural women, those segments of the population with the highest cancer mortality risk. Therefore, targeted strategies to increase screening in these population groups are needed. This paper describes a partnership between the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Family HealthCare of Alabama, a nonprofit health care agency, initiated to promote cancer control and prevention in a predominantly low-income, African-American population in rural western Alabama. The partnership has collaborated in the development of two research proposals designed specifically to evaluate cancer control strategies within the context of routine health care delivery. The UAB/Family HealthCare partnership is conducting two randomized treatment outcome studies funded by the National Cancer Institute to evaluate theory-based patient management strategies to promote patient adherence to screening recommendations for cervical cancer and breast cancer. The success of this academic-practice partnership can be seen in the funded research projects, the enhancement of preventive services in rural primary care, and in the potential to disseminate theory-based cancer control strategies throughout an extended primary care network.
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine 05/1999; 16(3 Suppl):58-62. · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Cancer screening rates are particularly low among poor, minority, and rural women, those segments of the population with the highest cancer mortality risk. Therefore, targeted strategies to increase screening in these population groups are needed.Methods: This paper describes a partnership between the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Family HealthCare of Alabama, a nonprofit health care agency, initiated to promote cancer control and prevention in a predominantly low-income, African-American population in rural western Alabama. The partnership has collaborated in the development of two research proposals designed specifically to evaluate cancer control strategies within the context of routine health care delivery.Results: The UAB/Family HealthCare partnership is conducting two randomized treatment outcome studies funded by the National Cancer Institute to evaluate theory-based patient management strategies to promote patient adherence to screening recommendations for cervical cancer and breast cancer.Conclusions: The success of this academic–practice partnership can be seen in the funded research projects, the enhancement of preventive services in rural primary care, and in the potential to disseminate theory-based cancer control strategies throughout an extended primary care network.
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine - AMER J PREV MED. 01/1999; 16(3):58-62.
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of intermittent smoking on pulmonary function was assessed among participants in the Lung Health Study, 5887 adult smokers with evidence of early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), followed up for 5 years. The mean annual rate of loss in FEV1% of predicted after year 1 was smallest for those who quit at some point during the first year of the study and stayed quit (-0.33%/year, +/-0.05%), intermediate for those who smoked intermittently during the study (-0.58%/year, +/-0.05%) and greatest for those who continued to smoke throughout the study (-1.18%/year, +/-0.03%). Surprisingly, those who made several attempts to quit smoking had less loss of lung function at comparable cumulative doses of cigarettes than those who continued to smoke. Quitting smoking for an interval followed by relapse to smoking appeared to provide a measurable and lasting benefit in comparison to continuous smoking. In this early COPD population, not only quitting smoking but attempts to quit smoking can prevent some loss of lung function. These results provide some encouragement to exsmokers who relapse on their way to complete cessation.
    Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 01/1999; 51(12):1317-26. · 5.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of intermittent smoking on pulmonary function was assessed among participants in the Lung Health Study, 5887 adult smokers with evidence of early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), followed up for 5 years. The mean annual rate of loss in FEV1% of predicted after year 1 was smallest for those who quit at some point during the first year of the study and stayed quit (−0.33%/year, ±0.05%), intermediate for those who smoked intermittently during the study (−0.58%/year, ±0.05%) and greatest for those who continued to smoke throughout the study (−1.18%/year, ±0.03%). Surprisingly, those who made several attempts to quit smoking had less loss of lung function at comparable cumulative doses of cigarettes than those who continued to smoke. Quitting smoking for an interval followed by relapse to smoking appeared to provide a measurable and lasting benefit in comparison to continuous smoking. In this early COPD population, not only quitting smoking but attempts to quit smoking can prevent some loss of lung function. These results provide some encouragement to exsmokers who relapse on their way to complete cessation.
    Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - J CLIN EPIDEMIOL. 01/1998; 51(12):1317-1326.
  • Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 01/1998; 51(12). · 5.33 Impact Factor
  • Controlled Clinical Trials - CONTR CLIN TRIAL. 01/1997; 18(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Several approaches for recruitment of African American adults with renal insufficiency due to hypertension (glomerular filtration rate between 25 and 70 ml/min/1.73 m2) were explored in the Pilot Study for the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK). Over a period of 42 weeks, prescreening information was obtained on 2880 individuals, of whom 498 (17%) were evaluated at a screening visit. Two hundred and twenty-five (8%) had an 125I-iothalamate assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Ninety-four of 97 participants who met all the study eligibility criteria were enrolled in the trial. The most common reasons for ineligibility during screening were absence of renal insufficiency or hypertension, presence of diabetes mellitus, and a body mass index above the acceptable level. Overall, an average of 31 prescreen contacts and 8 screening visits were conducted for every randomization (3.3% yield from prescreening to randomization). Screening in clinical practice was the most efficient method for recruitment (12.6% yield from prescreen contact to randomization compared to 1.1% from mass mailing campaigns, 1.3% from mass media campaigns, and 1.7% from referrals by patients with end-stage renal disease). Randomization yields increased with progressively higher age ranges (2.4%, 3.3%, and 6.0% prescreen to randomization yields for those aged < or = 50, 51-60, and 61-70, respectively). A slight majority (51%) of the prescreen contacts were women, but 75% of the randomized participants were men. Our results suggest that clinic-based screening is an effective approach for recruitment of African Americans with hypertension and renal insufficiency into clinical trials. They also suggest that enrollment of African American women in such studies is a special challenge.
    Controlled Clinical Trials 09/1996; 17(4 Suppl):17S-33S.
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    ABSTRACT: The Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS), an electronic monitor which records the date and time of bottle cap openings, and pill counts were used to assess patterns of adherence for the primary antihypertensive drug in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension Pilot Study (AASK). Blacks with hypertension and moderately reduced renal function were randomized to one of two levels of blood pressure control and to one of three antihypertensive drug regimens: primary therapy with a calcium channel blocker, an angiotension converting enzyme inhibitor, or a beta-blocker. Of the 94 participants in AASK, 91 had MEMS recordings and pill counts for 313 regularly scheduled monthly follow-up visits. The average length of follow-up was 4.6 months. An acceptable level of adherence by pill count was achieved if 80% to 100% of the prescribed pills were not returned to the clinic. Adherence by MEMS to a once-a-day drug dosing schedule was acceptable if 80% of the time intervals between MEMS openings were within 24 +/- 6 h. Acceptable adherence by pill count was observed at 68% of the follow-up visits; MEMS indicated nonadherence at 47% of those visits. Blood pressure was within goal in 50% of the participants who were adherent by both pill count and MEMS throughout their follow-up visits, and only 14% of the participants who were identified nonadherent by one or both methods. These findings suggest that electronic monitoring is a useful adjunct to pill counts in assessing adherence to antihypertensive drugs. Feedback of electronically collected information on dosing intervals to participants and staff may enhance adherence.
    American Journal of Hypertension 09/1996; 9(8):719-25. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Pilot Study evaluated the feasibility of carrying out a randomized, multicenter, 7-year clinical trial to determine the effects of two goal levels of blood pressure control and three antihypertensive drug regimens on decline in glomerular filtration rate in African Americans with clinically diagnosed hypertensive nephrosclerosis. Participants were randomized to either a usual mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) goal group (102-107 mm Hg) or a low-MAP goal group (< or = 92 mm Hg) and to a drug regimen (initial therapy with either atenolol, amlodipine, or enalapril). Quality of life was assessed by the Medical Outcomes Short-Form 36 (MOS SF-36) at baseline and the last follow-up visit for 84 of the 94 participants of the AASK Pilot Study. Symptoms were assessed at baseline and throughout the course of therapy by participant self-report. Mean SF-36 scores increased significantly on physical functioning (9.2), role limitations (physical) (19.0), social functioning (9.0), and vitality dimensions (5.6) from baseline to the last follow-up visit in the usual MAP goal group. Scores for the eight health dimensions assessed by the MOS SF-36 did not change significantly during the same time period either in the low-MAP goal group or in any of the drug regimens. The mean score for general health perception was significantly lower at the last follow-up visit in the enalapril drug regimen (49.9) compared to drug regimens with atenolol (65.4) or amlodipine (63.9). Physical functioning, role limitations (emotional), social functioning, mental health, vitality, and general health perception scores were negatively correlated with self-reported symptoms during treatment. We conclude that selected dimensions of quality of life improved during the AASK Pilot Study only in participants randomized to the usual MAP goal group. Significant differences between MAP goal groups and drug regimens at the end of follow-up were observed for only a few health dimensions.
    Controlled Clinical Trials 09/1996; 17(4 Suppl):40S-46S.
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    ABSTRACT: The African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Pilot Study evaluated the feasibility of conducting a 7-year clinical trial to assess the effect of two levels of blood pressure control based on mean arterial pressure (MAP) (low goal ≤ 92 mm Hg or usual goal of 102–107 mm Hg) and three antihypertensive drug regimens (atenolol, amlodipine, or enalapril) as initial therapy in slowing the decline of renal function in African Americans with clinically diagnosed hypertensive nephrosclerosis. Ninety-four African American men and women between 18 and 70 years of age were randomized and followed for an average of 4.6 months.On average, participants attended 87.5% of the scheduled monthly follow-up visits and achieved an acceptable level of medication adherence (80%–100% of prescribed doses by pill count) at 65.4% of those visits. Blood pressure levels within goal were observed in 17.5% and 25.6% of the participants in the low- and usual MAP goal groups, respectively. Neither attendance nor medication adherence by pill count was associated with attainment of goal blood pressure. Although AASK Pilot Study participants maintained excellent attendance, their pill counts were lower than previously reported among clinical trial participants and goal blood pressure levels were difficult to achieve during the short period of follow-up.
    Controlled Clinical Trials 09/1996;

Publication Stats

338 Citations
40.51 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
      Little Rock, Arkansas, United States
  • 2006–2011
    • University of Arkansas at Little Rock
      Little Rock, Arkansas, United States
  • 2007
    • Baptist Health Schools Little Rock
      Little Rock, Arkansas, United States
  • 1998–1999
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Preventive Medicine
      Birmingham, AL, United States