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Publications (4)18.02 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To determine the neurocognitive effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blind, 2-arm, sham-controlled, multicenter trial conducted at 5 U.S. university, hospital, or private practices. Of 1,516 participants enrolled, 1,105 were randomized, and 1,098 participants diagnosed with OSA contributed to the analysis of the primary outcome measures. Active or sham CPAP MEASUREMENTS: THREE NEUROCOGNITIVE VARIABLES, EACH REPRESENTING A NEUROCOGNITIVE DOMAIN: Pathfinder Number Test-Total Time (attention and psychomotor function [A/P]), Buschke Selective Reminding Test-Sum Recall (learning and memory [L/M]), and Sustained Working Memory Test-Overall Mid-Day Score (executive and frontal-lobe function [E/F]) The primary neurocognitive analyses showed a difference between groups for only the E/F variable at the 2 month CPAP visit, but no difference at the 6 month CPAP visit or for the A/P or L/M variables at either the 2 or 6 month visits. When stratified by measures of OSA severity (AHI or oxygen saturation parameters), the primary E/F variable and one secondary E/F neurocognitive variable revealed transient differences between study arms for those with the most severe OSA. Participants in the active CPAP group had a significantly greater ability to remain awake whether measured subjectively by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale or objectively by the maintenance of wakefulness test. CPAP treatment improved both subjectively and objectively measured sleepiness, especially in individuals with severe OSA (AHI > 30). CPAP use resulted in mild, transient improvement in the most sensitive measures of executive and frontal-lobe function for those with severe disease, which suggests the existence of a complex OSA-neurocognitive relationship. Registered at clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00051363. CITATION: Kushida CA; Nichols DA; Holmes TH; Quan SF; Walsh JK; Gottlieb DJ; Simon RD; Guilleminault C; White DP; Goodwin JL; Schweitzer PK; Leary EB; Hyde PR; Hirshkowitz M; Green S; McEvoy LK; Chan C; Gevins A; Kay GG; Bloch DA; Crabtree T; Demen WC. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on neurocognitive function in obstructive sleep apnea patients: the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES). SLEEP 2012;35(12):1593-1602.
    Sleep 01/2012; 35(12):1593-602. · 5.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and neurocognitive performance in a large cohort of adults. Cross-sectional analyses of polysomnographic and neurocognitive data from 1204 adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), assessed at baseline before randomization to either continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or sham CPAP. Sleep and respiratory indices obtained by laboratory polysomnography and several measures of neurocognitive performance. Weak correlations were found for both the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and several indices of oxygen desaturation and neurocognitive performance in unadjusted analyses. After adjustment for level of education, ethnicity, and gender, there was no association between the AHI and neurocognitive performance. However, severity of oxygen desaturation was weakly associated with worse neurocognitive performance on some measures of intelligence, attention, and processing speed. The impact of OSA on neurocognitive performance is small for many individuals with this condition and is most related to the severity of hypoxemia.
    Sleep 01/2011; 34(3):303-314B. · 5.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) has been associated with reduced risk of breast cancer. Sulindac, a nonselective NSAID with both cyclooxygenase-2-dependent and -independent activities, is a candidate for breast chemoprevention. We conducted a phase Ib trial in 30 women at increased risk for breast cancer to evaluate the breast tissue distribution of sulindac at two dose levels (150 mg daily and 150 mg twice daily for 6 weeks), using nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) as a surrogate of breast tissue drug exposure. We also explored the effect of sulindac on drug-induced biomarkers in NAF. We show that sulindac and its metabolites partition to human breast as measured by NAF levels. Sulindac intervention did not decrease 13,14-dihydro-15-keto prostaglandin A(2), a stable derivative of prostaglandin E(2), in NAF, but exposure was associated with a significant trend towards higher levels of growth differentiation factor 15 in NAF in women receiving 150 mg twice daily (P = 0.038). These results are the first to show partitioning of sulindac and metabolites to human breast tissue and the first evidence for a potential dose-dependent effect of sulindac on growth differentiation factor 15 levels in NAF.
    Cancer Prevention Research 01/2010; 3(1):101-7. · 4.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the size, time course, and durability of the effects of long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on neurocognitive function, mood, sleepiness, and quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Randomized, double-blinded, 2-arm, sham-controlled, multicenter, long-term, intention-to-treat trial of CPAP therapy. Sleep clinics and laboratories at 5 university medical centers and community-based hospitals. Patients or Participants: Target enrollment is 1100 randomly assigned subjects across 5 clinical centers. Active versus sham (subtherapeutic) CPAP. Measurements and Results: A battery of conventional and novel tests designed to evaluate neurocognitive function, mood, sleepiness, and quality of life. The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) is designed to study obstructive sleep apnea and test the effects of CPAP through a comprehensive, controlled, and long-term trial in a large sample of subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2006; 2(3):288-300. · 2.93 Impact Factor