Xavier Renault

Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

Are you Xavier Renault?

Claim your profile

Publications (8)0 Total impact

  • Source
    X. Renault, F. Kordon, J. Hugues
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The verification of High-Integrity Real-Time systems combines heterogeneous concerns: preserving timing constraints, ensuring behavioral invariants, or specific execution patterns. Furthermore, each concern requires specific verification techniques; and combining all these techniques require automation to preserve semantics and consistency. Model-based approaches focus on the definition of representation of a system, and its transformation to equivalent representation for further processing, including verification and are thus good candidates to support such automation. In this paper, we show there is a strong requirement to automatically map high-level models to abstractions that are dedicated to specific analysis techniques taking full advantage of tools. We discuss this requirement on a case study: validating some aspects of AADL models using both coloured and time Petri Nets.
    Rapid System Prototyping, 2009. RSP '09. IEEE/IFIP International Symposium on; 07/2009
  • Source
    X. Renault, F. Kordon, J. Hugues
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Modeling of distributed real-time embedded (DRE) systems allows one to evaluate models behavior or schedulability. However, assessing that a DRE system's behavior is correct in the causal domain is a challenge: one need to elaborate a mathematical abstraction suitable for checking properties like absence of deadlock or safety conditions (i.e. an invariant remains all over the execution). In this paper, we propose a global approach to building Petri Nets models from an architecture described using AADL. We consider the semantics of interacting entities defined by AADL, and show how to build corresponding Petri Nets models. Based on a case study, we show how the verification process could be automated and parameterized.
    Object/Component/Service-Oriented Real-Time Distributed Computing, 2009. ISORC '09. IEEE International Symposium on; 04/2009
  • Source
    Xavier Renault
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dans une démarche classique d'ingénierie dirigée par les modèles (IDM), l'ingénieur modélise son système à l'aide d'une notation semi-formelle, le valide puis l'implante. L'étape de validation, basée sur ces modèles, est particulièrement cruciale pour les systèmes temps-réel répartis et embarqués (TR2E), afin de s'assurer de leur respect d'invariants de sécurité, ou de leur bon fonctionnement logique ou temporel. Cependant, une démarche IDM n'est pas suffisante car elle n'indique pas comment utiliser les modèles pour faire des analyses. Quels modèles (ou vues) utiliser ? Pour analyser quel type de propriétés ? Ainsi, il est nécessaire d'adopter une démarche d'Ingénierie dirigée par les Vérifications et les Validations (IDV2) : les modèles créés sont ceux qui sont utiles pour s'assurer que le système est correctement construit (vérification), et qu'il satisfait un ensemble de propriétés spécifiées en amont dans le processus de développement (validation). Cette thèse propose un processus de développement, de validation et de vérification basé sur des notations formelles, et dédié aux applications temps-réel réparties embarquées. Nous nous appuyons sur une notation pivot standard pour appliquer cette démarche IDV2 : le langage AADL (Architecture Analysis and Design Language) permet à l'ingénieur de spécifier son application TR2E depuis son architecture matérielle jusqu'à son déploiement logiciel. Il repose sur l'existence d'un exécutif ayant certaines propriétés et proposant différents services. Ce processus prend en compte les aspects comportementaux de l'application ainsi que les aspects architecturaux de l'exécutif. Il repose sur des notations standardisées, permettant de faire face aux problèmes d'interopérabilités des outils mis en oeuvre. Pour l'applicatif, des propriétés comme l'absence d'interblocage, l'utilisation et le dimensionnement de ressources ou encore l'ordonnancement du système sont validées. Pour l'exécutif, le fait que l'architecture de celui-ci et les services proposés sont en adéquation avec les propriétés évoquées lors de sa configuration est vérifié. Notre démarche permet d'obtenir des retours aussi bien à propos de l'applicatif que de l'exécutif, et permet de corriger ou modifier les modèles dans un processus de développement itératif. Au cours de notre démarche, nous exploitons et transformons les spécifications AADL vers différentes notations standardisées : les réseaux de Petri pour la validation de l'applicatif, la notation Z pour la vérification de l'exécutif utilisé, PolyORB.
    01/2009;
  • Source
    Fabrice Kordon, Jérôme Hugues, Xavier Renault
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The definition and construction of complex computer-based systems require not just software engineering knowledge, but also many other domain-specific techniques to ensure many system’s functional and non-functional properties. Hence, there is a trend to move away from programming languages to models on which one can reason: model-driven engineering. Yet, this remains a complex task: one need to master many techniques. In this paper, we claim that MDE is incomplete: it is “just” an implementation framework to support advanced model-based techniques, verification of systems non-functional properties, code generation, etc. There is a conceptual gap to fill to know “what” to do with models. We propose to switch from MDE to VDE: Verification-Driven Engineering, so that the user knows how to model a system to analyze it. We sum up existing techniques and their relevant application domains.
    Software Technologies for Embedded and Ubiquitous Systems, 6th IFIP WG 10.2 International Workshop, SEUS 2008, Anacarpi, Capri Island, Italy, October 1-3, 2008, Proceedings; 01/2008
  • Source
    Xavier Renault, Jérôme Hugues, Fabrice Kordon
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The complexity of middleware leads to complex Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and semantics, supported by configurable components in the middleware. Those components are selected to provide the desired semantics. Yet, incorrect configuration can lead to faulty middleware executions, detected late in the development cycle. We use formals methods to tackle this problem. They allow us to find appropriate composition of middleware components and the use of their APIs, and to detect valid or faulty sequences. To provide reusable results, we modeled a canonical middleware architecture using Z. We propose a validation scenario to verify middleware’s invariants. We define invariants to exhibit inconsistent usage of these APIs. The specification has been checked with the Z/EVES [13] theorem prover.
    Formal Methods for Open Object-Based Distributed Systems, 10th IFIP WG 6.1 International Conference, FMOODS 2008, Oslo, Norway, June 4-6, 2008, Proceedings; 01/2008
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper is about the application of formal methods to model and analyze complex systems in the context of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS). It suggests a specification methodology based on a set of UML diagrams to generate a complete analyzable formal model. The methodology integrates the requirements of incremental and modular development for complex systems. The analysis made on the formal model is carried out through qualitative criteria, verified by model checking tools. The proposed guidelines are illustrated by a case study which considers cars in traffic situations, exchanging information about their states to reach consistency among their driving decisions.
    Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference, 2007. ITSC 2007. IEEE; 01/2007
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Due to the state-space size explosion problem, behavioral analysis techniques are difficult to scale up to industrial size problems. Our group couples research on analysis tools with an introspection on modeling and software engineering techniques. CPN-AMI is an integrated development and analysis environment dedicated to Petri nets. The numerous services it offers are built by a homogeneous integration of tools developed internally, and third-party tools from partner universities. These tools include state of the art algorithms and data-structures. This third major release offers better support for modeling and analysis of very large systems
    Sixth International Conference on Application of Concurrency to System Design (ACSD 2006), 28-30 June 2006, Turku, Finland; 01/2006
  • Xavier Renault, Jérôme Hugues
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: AADL (Architecture Analysis and Design Language) est un langage de description d'architecture permettant une multitude d'analyses formelles ou semi-formelles, en utilisant par exemple des analyses statiques ou, encore, des techniques de model-checking. AADL fournit un niveau d'abstraction intéressant pour exprimer de nombreuses constructions utiles à la réalisation de systèmes embarqués temps réel. Parallèlement, nous remarquons que les propriétés à vérifier sur ces systèmes ne couvrent bien souvent qu'un sous-ensemble des éléments du modèle (composants ou propriétés non-fonctionnelles). Dans le présent article il est montré comment tirer parti de ces informations pour définir plusieurs patrons de transformation d'AADL vers les réseaux de Petri adaptés à la propriété à vérifier. Les propriétés qualitatives du système (comme la détection d'interblocage ou la traçabilité des messages échangés) peuvent être analysées à l'aide des réseaux de Petri colorés, en utilisant l'environnement CPN-AMI. Les propriétés quantitatives (comme l'ordonnancement du système ou la vérification du dimensionnement des tampons de communication) peuvent être traitées à l'aide des réseaux de Petri temporels, en utilisant l'environnement Tina. Les auteurs se sont intéressés à l'élaboration de patrons génériques pouvant être annotés en accord avec le type de propriété à traiter; ils montrent comment ces patrons permettent de limiter l'explosion combinatoire en restreignant le modèle à analyser aux seuls blocs utiles.