J M González-Posada

Hospital Universitario de Canarias, San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain

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Publications (56)171.78 Total impact

  • Clinica chimica acta; international journal of clinical chemistry 01/2014; · 2.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In Spain, an increasing number of transplant patients alternate their follow-up visits between transplant and non-transplant centers. Consequently, integral care programs between these centers should be developed for transplant patients. However, coordination between centers is sometimes suboptimal, formal referral from the transplant center to the non-transplant center according to a protocol does not always occur, and nephrologists working in non-transplant centers do not always have the resources required for adequate follow-up. In this article, we present 2 models (in Galicia and the Canary Islands) in which coordinated management between the transplant and the non-transplant center is required, given the characteristics of the territory. These models offer many advantages for patients and professionals in both types of center. The organization of these centers may serve as a model for progressive collaboration between transplant and non-transplant centers in other autonomous regions of Spain.
    Diálisis y Trasplante 01/2013; 34(1):28–32.
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    ABSTRACT: Data on the combined associations of albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with renal transplant outcomes are limited. Our objective was to explore how renal transplant outcomes could be predicted by a combined variable of early low-grade albuminuria and allograft dysfunction. We studied a cohort of adult deceased-donor kidney transplant recipients who were subdivided into four groups according to median albuminuria (100 mg/day, interquartile range, 0-470 mg/day) and median eGFR (60 mL/min/1.73 m(2); interquartile range, 30-73 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) at third month posttransplantation as follows: group I (albuminuria <100 and eGFR >60, n=238); group II (albuminuria ≥100 and eGFR >60, n=151); group III (albuminuria <100 and eGFR ≤60; n=167); and group IV (albuminuria ≥100 and eGFR ≤60, n=228). Death-censored graft survival was significantly lower in group IV compared with the rest (P<0.0001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis using fixed and time-dependent covariates showed that the combination of low-grade albuminuria and lower eGFR was associated with graft failure (hazard ratio, 2.2, 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.7; P=0.003). Likewise, but to a lesser extent, the risk of mortality was increased for group IV (hazard ratio, 1.7, 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.8; P=0.042). Early association of low-grade albuminuria and allograft dysfunction represents an important risk factor of graft failure and mortality. This additive effect should be considered to identify individuals at risk for adverse kidney transplantation outcomes.
    Transplantation 02/2012; 93(3):297-303. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes may accelerate atheromatosis in uremic patients. Our aim was to assess the influence of type 1 diabetes on the atheromatosis-related inflammation in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We analyzed the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in the inferior epigastric artery walls of type 1 diabetic patients with CKD (n = 22) and compared it with nondiabetic uremic patients (n = 92) at the time of kidney transplantation. We evaluated the expression of interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemotractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and the activation of nuclear factor-κβ p65 (NFkB-p65). Common carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) was determined by conventional echography. IL-6, MCP-1, and VCAM-1 proteins were elevated in type 1 diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic subjects (P < 0.05). The nuclear localization of NFkB-p65 was higher in type 1 diabetic patients (P < 0.01) and correlated with the levels of MCP-1 in this group (r = 0.726, P < 0.001). Arterial fibrosis correlated with IL-6 and MCP-1 levels (r = 0.411, P < 0.001 and r = 0.378, P = 0.001). A significant correlation was observed between VCAM-1 levels and both the degree of arterial narrowing and c-IMT. Type 1 diabetes produces a proinflammatory state in the arteries of end-stage CKD patients, with increased levels of IL-6, MCP-1, and VCAM-1, as well as a greater degree of p65 activation, which are associated with more severe vascular lesions and higher c-IMT. Although causality is not demonstrated, these findings support the major role of inflammation in type 1 diabetic patients with CKD.
    Diabetes care 12/2011; 35(2):427-33. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The beneficial effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) in kidney transplant recipients on modern immunosuppression is not yet well established. Our objective was to investigate the impact of the use of ACEI/ARB on patient and graft survival in a cohort of kidney transplant recipients. A total of 990 patients, who received a single deceased donor kidney at our institution between 1996 and 2005, were included in this longitudinal cohort study. All-cause mortality and death-censored graft loss were the primary outcomes. We used traditional time-dependent Cox model (unweighted) and inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting of marginal structural models (weighted Cox model), controlling for time-dependent confounding by indication. A total of 414 patients (42%) received ACEI/ARB through the study period (median duration 14 months, interquartile range 6-40 months). ACEI/ARB use was associated with reduction of risk for mortality in the crude [hazard ratio (HR) 0.627, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.412-0.953] and adjusted Cox analysis (HR 0.626, 95% CI 0.407-0.963). Similar results were observed after adjusting for confounding by indication (HR 0.629, 95% CI 0.407-0.973). By contrast, ACEI/ARB use was not associated with significant improvement of graft survival after kidney transplantation. ACEI/ARB prescription may be suggested as beneficial among multiple medications for reducing mortality in kidney transplant recipients, but its use was not associated with longer graft survival.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 05/2011; 27(1):417-22. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. New-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is associated with poorer outcomes in kidney transplantation (KT). Thus, identification of modifiable risk factors may be crucial for ameliorating the impact of this entity on transplant outcomes. We assessed the relationships between the weight, body mass index (BMI) and weight gain with NODAT.Methods. We retrospectively analysed 2168 KT performed in Spain during 1990, 1994, 1998 and 2002, with a functioning graft after the first year. At 1 year after KT, three groups were considered: (i) NODAT group (n = 215); (ii) impaired fasting glucose (IFG) group (n = 389); (iii) control group (n = 1564).Results. The incidence of NODAT was 10.8%, 9.9% and 10.0% at 3, 12 and 24 months post-transplantation, respectively. Older recipient age (P < 0.0001) and greater use of tacrolimus (P < 0.0001) were observed in NODAT group. Obesity was more frequent in NODAT group (P < 0.0001), but patients with NODAT had a lower weight gain during the first year after KT (P = 0.038). On multivariate analysis, independent risk factors associated with the development of NODAT were: recipient age [odds ratio (OR): 1.060, P = 0.0001], tacrolimus (OR: 1.611, P = 0.005), triglycerides (OR: 1.511, P = 0.018), positive hepatitis C virus (HCV) status (OR: 1.969, P = 0.001) and pre-transplant body mass index (BMI) (OR: 1.135, P = 0.0001), but not the weight gain.Conclusions. BMI, but not the weight gain at 1 year after transplant, is an independent risk factor for NODAT. Tailoring clinical strategies may minimize the impact of this complication.
    NDT Plus 06/2010; 3(Suppl_2):ii15-ii20.
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    ABSTRACT: In our Universitary Hospital of Canarias we iniciated in May 2008 a induction therapy protocol for sensitized patients receiving cadaveric renal graft using intravenous immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis and rituximab plus immunosuppression with prednisone, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. We present the results of four patients. Everyone had anti-HLA antibodies rate (PRA by CDC) more than 75%, were on a waiting list during 4 to 17 years and follow-up time was 10-14 months after transplantation. Patient and graft survival in this period was 100%. Only one patient suffered a humoral acute rejection and another one cellular rejection, in both cases reversible with treatment. During the first year, no evidence of de novo donor-specific antibodies was detected. All patients had significantly reduced the CD19+ cells percentage after infusion of rituximab. Neurological symptoms suggestive of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy or serious viral infections after transplantation have not been observed. Additionally, no immediate side effects were observed after administration of medication. In summary, induction therapy by combining immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis and rituximab in hypersensitive patients allows the realization of deceased kidney transplantation with good results in the short and medium-term without serious side effects. It remains to know whether this success will continue in the long term.
    Nefrologia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia 01/2010; 30(2):252-7. · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Goodpasture's syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) and alveolar hemorrhage in the presence of antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies. Central nervous system involvement is highly unusual in the absence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. We report the case of a 20-year-old man with RPGN accompanied by bloody sputum, tonic-clonic seizure and high titers of anti-GBM antibody. After treatment with immunosuppressants and plasmapheresis, the patient showed reduced anti-GBM antibody titers and improved neurologic and respiratory symptoms, but renal failure persisted, requiring hemodialysis. Twenty months later, with the disease in remission, he underwent deceased-donor renal transplantation.
    Nefrologia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia 01/2010; 30(5):584-7. · 1.27 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation 01/2010; 90. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In our Universitary Hospital of Canarias we iniciated in May 2008 a induction therapy protocol for sensitized patients receiving cadaveric renal graft using intravenous immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis and rituximab plus immunosuppression with prednisone, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. We present the results of four patients. Everyone had anti-HLA antibodies rate (PRA by CDC) more than 75%, were on a waiting list during 4 to 17 years and follow-up time was 10-14 months after transplantation. Patient and graft survival in this period was 100%. Only one patient suffered a humoral acute rejection and another one cellular rejection, in both cases reversible with treatment. During the first year, no evidence of de novo donor-specific antibodies was detected. All patients had significantly reduced the CD19+ cells percentage after infusion of rituximab. Neurological symptoms suggestive of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy or serious viral infections after transplantation have not been observed. Additionally, no immediate side effects were observed after administration of medication. In summary, induction therapy by combining immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis and rituximab in hypersensitive patients allows the realization of deceased kidney transplantation with good results in the short and medium-term without serious side effects. It remains to know whether this success will continue in the long term.
    Nefrologia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia 12/2009; 30(2):252-257. · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Goodpasture's syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) and alveolar hemorrhage in the presence of anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies. Central nervous system involvement is highly unusual in the absence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. We report the case of a 20-year-old man with RPGN accompanied by bloody sputum, tonic-clonic seizure and high titers of anti-GBM antibody. After treatment with immunosuppressants and plasmapheresis, the patient showed reduced anti-GBM antibody titers and improved neurologic and respiratory symptoms, but renal failure persisted, requiring hemodialysis. Twenty months later, with the disease in remission, he underwent deceased-donor renal transplantation.
    Nefrologia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia 12/2009; 30(5):584-587. · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although pancreas transplantation (PT) is the treatment of choice in selected diabetic patients, the International Pancreas Transplant Registry (IPTR) has reported important differences in activity between USA and Europe. Of all cases reported, 75% are from USA and only 23% from Europe. Therefore, an analysis of PT activity in selected European countries (SEC) and USA was performed. Materials and methods. We compared national data reports (2002-06) of deceased donors (DD) and deceased solid organ transplantation (DSOT), with special attention to PT activity from 13 SEC countries (375 million inhabitants) and USA (298 million inhabitants). The number of PT performed in USA was 2-fold higher than in SEC, with the annual rate >2.4 times higher in USA [5.08-4.64 versus 1.61-1.91 per million population (p.m.p.)]. DD and other DSOT activity rates were only slightly higher in USA. In SEC, important differences in PT activity rate were found between countries in the same year (0-6.21 p.m.p.) and in the same country between different years (6.21-2.47 p.m.p.), unrelated to DD or other DSOT activity rate. PT activity rate increased in SEC from 1.61 to 1.91 p.m.p. but decreased in six countries. The waiting list for PT at the end of 2006 was almost 2-fold higher in USA than in SEC. Differences in PT activity rate between 13 SEC countries and USA were not related to DD or other DSOT activity. Different waiting list inclusion criteria or incidence of diabetes complications may be considered in more specific studies.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 11/2009; 25(3):952-9. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: All-cause mortality is high after kidney transplantation (KT), but no prognostic index has focused on predicting mortality in KT using baseline and emergent comorbidity after KT. A total of 4928 KT recipients were used to derive a risk score predicting mortality. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: a modeling population (n=2452), used to create a new index, and a testing population (n=2476), used to test this index. Multivariate Cox regression model coefficients of baseline (age, weight, time on dialysis, diabetes, hepatitis C, and delayed graft function) and emergent comorbidity within the first posttransplant year (diabetes, proteinuria, renal function, and immunosuppressants) were used to weigh each variable in the calculation of the score and allocated into risk quartiles. The probability of death at 3 years, estimated by baseline cumulative hazard function from the Cox model [P (death)=1-0.993592764 (exp(score/100)], increased from 0.9% in the lowest-risk quartile (score=40) to 4.7% in the highest risk-quartile (score=200). The observed incidence of death increased with increasing risk quartiles in testing population (log-rank analysis, P<0.0001). The overall C-index was 0.75 (95% confidence interval: 0.72-0.78) and 0.74 (95% confidence interval: 0.70-0.77) in both populations, respectively. This new index is an accurate tool to identify high-risk patients for mortality after KT.
    Transplantation 09/2009; 88(6):803-9. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a severe case of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), secondary to a candida glabrata retroperitoneal abscess in a 41-year-old simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT) recipient. Despite percutaneous abscess drainage and antifungal therapy, general status deteriorated with persistent fever, severe pancytopenia and liver dysfunction. Presence of hypertriglyceridemia, very high serum levels of ferritin and hemophagocytosis in a bone-marrow aspirate gave the diagnosis of HLH. Of note, change from tacrolimus to cyclosporine together with dexamethasone produced rapid response with status improvement. We concluded that HLH, a rare but often fatal condition characterized by excessive activation of lymphocytes and macrophages, is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in solid-organ transplanted patients and must be suspected in the presence of fever, blood cytopenia and liver dysfunction. Specific antiinfectious therapy together with cyclosporine and dexamethasone may be a therapeutic approach.
    Clinical nephrology 08/2008; 70(1):82-6. · 1.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prolonged cold ischemia time (CIT) is associated with delayed graft function and worse kidney transplant (KT) outcome, but the effect of CIT on long-term allograft survival in KT from younger donors has not been well established. We investigated the predictive value of CIT exposure on long-term death-censored graft loss in 829 KT recipients from younger donors (<50 years) that were performed in our center between 1991 and 2005. Overall death-censored graft failure rate was significantly higher in CIT>or=19 h group versus CIT<19 h group (26 vs. 16.5%; P = 0.002). Significant differences were also observed when patients with primary nonfunctioning graft were excluded (21 vs. 14%; P = 0.020) and in patients who received tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (12 vs. 4%; P = 0.05). By multivariate Cox analysis, CIT was found to be independently associated with death-censored graft loss with a 20% increase for every 5 h of CIT [relative risk (RR) 1.04; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.01-1.1; P = 0.021]. Likewise, graft loss risk significantly increased in CIT>or=19 h group versus CIT<19 h group (RR 1.5; 95%CI: 1.1-2.1; P = 0.023). Prolonged CIT is an independent predictor of graft survival in KT from younger donors. Efforts at minimizing CIT (<19 h) should improve transplant outcome significantly in this population.
    Transplant International 06/2008; 21(10):955-62. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Insulin resistance precedes overt diabetes in the general population and hypertriglyceridemia is a reliable marker of the disorder. Thus, patients in the waiting list with hypertriglyceridemia may be at risk for new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT). Objectives. We investigate whether pre-transplant triglyceride (TG) levels are a risk factor for NODAT and whether they exert a combined effect with the type of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI). We analysed 314 consecutive non-diabetic recipients [215 cyclosporine A (CsA); 99 tacrolimus (Tacro)] transplanted between 1999 and 2003 with a mean follow-up of 34 months. Outcome was NODAT defined by ADA criteria. NODAT developed in 81 recipients (25.8%). Multivariate analysis which included a propensity score for factors determining CNI allocation showed that age (OR: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.03-1.09), pre-transplant BMI (OR: 1.1; 95% CI: 1.02-1.17),TG levels (OR: 1.3 per 50 mg/dl increment, 95% CI: 1.07-1.6) and treated acute rejection (OR: 4.8, 95% CI: 3-11), but not the type of CNI, were independent risk factors for NODAT. A significant interaction between pre-transplant TG and type of CNI was observed. Using CsA as the reference, the combination of Tacro plus pre-transplant hypertriglyceridemia (>/=200 mg/dl) showed an OR of 3.26 (1.4-7.8) to develop NODAT, contrasting with an OR of 0.75 (0.34-1.6) in Tacro recipients with pre-transplant TG levels <200 mg/dl. Pre-transplant hypertriglyceridemia was a risk factor for NODAT only in recipients treated with Tacro; it highlights the importance of pre-transplant insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of NODAT.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 04/2008; 23(4):1436-41. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of pregnancy on kidney transplant recipients have been widely described, although its impact on the mother, the fetus and the graft is still debated. Experience in simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation is limited, with few reported cases, which increases uncertainty about guidelines to follow in this situation. We describe a case of successful pregnancy in a 35 year-old patient who underwent simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation 34 months before delivery. After modifications in immunosuppressive therapy (with tacrolimus and mycophenolate, the latter being switched to azathioprine), pregnancy evolved favourably. Delivery was by caesarean section due to fetal distress at 38 weeks of gestational age. Five months after delivery the child shows normal development while both pancreas and kidney grafts show normal function.
    Nefrologia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia 02/2008; 28(2):218-21. · 1.27 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation 01/2008; 86. · 3.78 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation 01/2008; 86. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Kidney transplantation (KT) is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal failure, but such patients are increasingly older and have additional comorbid conditions leading to high mortality rates after transplantation. Delayed graft function is a common complication after KT, especially in recipients who receive expanded criteria donor, and these complications are associated with a poorer graft survival in the long term. Taken together, an appropriate assessment of comorbidity grouped in prognostic indexes could be a useful tool to make crucial therapeutic decisions at the time of transplant. Allocation systems based upon a recipient risk score, as well as identification of risk factors for delayed graft function, may improve outcomes after KT. The aim of this review is to assess the contribution and utility of comorbid conditions, grouped in prognostic indexes to predict and improve kidney transplant outcomes.
    Transplantation reviews (Orlando, Fla.) 01/2008; 22(1):21-6.

Publication Stats

641 Citations
171.78 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1990–2014
    • Hospital Universitario de Canarias
      San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain
  • 2011–2012
    • Hospital Regional Universitario Carlos Haya Málaga
      • Department of Nephrology
      Málaga, Andalusia, Spain
  • 1996–2007
    • Universidad de La Laguna
      San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain