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Publications (8)0.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The distributive trades, consisting of wholesaling and retailing, are a key sector of the economy. As the main interface between producers and consumers, the sector is particularly important from a monetary policy point of view: this is where most consumer goods prices are ultimately set. Despite almost 20 years of the Single Market, mark-ups in the distributive trades sector can still be substantial and differ considerably across countries, while cross-border trade remains limited. This report examines the structural features of the distributive trades sector which are likely to play an important role in determining price level and infl ation differences across countries.
    09/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: This report aims to analyse euro area energy markets and the impact of energy price changes on the macroeconomy from a monetary policy perspective. The core task of the report is to analyse the impact of energy price developments on output and consumer prices. Nevertheless, understanding the link between energy price fluctuations, inflationary pressures and the role of monetary policy in reacting to such pressure requires a deeper look at the structure of the economy. Energy prices have presented a challenge for the Eurosystem, as the volatility of the energy component of consumer prices has been high since the creation of EMU. At the same time, a look back into the past may not necessarily be very informative for gauging the likely impact of energy price changes on overall inflation in the future. For instance, the reaction of HICP inflation to energy price fluctuations seems to have been more muted during the past decade than in earlier periods such as the 1970s.
    06/2010;
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    David Cornille, Aidan Meyler
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we examine the relationship between oil prices and consumer gas prices in the euro area. The main features of the paper are: (1) the combination of low frequency (semi-annual) consumer gas price data on price levels from Eurostat with higher frequency (monthly) index HICP data; (2) the consideration of the different stages in the supply chain - from oil prices, to wholesale (border and spot market prices) to consumer prices; (3) analysis at the aggregated euro area and individual country level; and (4) a sample period covering from 1995 to 2010, covering a period with relatively low and stable oil prices, but also one with higher and more volatile oil prices. The questions we address are: (a) what is the behaviour of gas prices and in particular the pass through of upstream oil and gas prices into consumer prices (i.e. how much is passed through and how quickly) and (b) are there differences across countries. Our main findings are that: First, on average, gas import prices are passed through fully in to consumer gas prices, albeit with some lag. An implication of this is that the elasticity of consumer prices with respect to upstream prices is an increasing function of their level. Second, accounting for the regular calendar for price ‘resetting’ significantly improves the fit of the estimations. However, this cannot be done via regular seasonal dummies but they must be interacted with the error correction term as the reset adjustment may be up or down. Third, in general the fit of the estimations is higher using oil prices as the explanatory variable rather than gas import prices. This may be because gas price setters take into account the signal from current oil price levels when resetting their prices, whereas gas import prices are generally backward looking as in Europe they are mostly index-linked to oil price developments in the preceding months. Fourth, regarding cross-country patterns, there is some evidence of differences which may be linked to differences in the degree of market liberalisation. Lastly, whilst there are signs of some changes in historical long-term relationship between oil prices and gas import prices, these are too recent to be identified robustly using the relatively low frequency, aggregate data we utilise in this paper.
    01/2010;
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    Maarten Dossche, David Cornille
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    ABSTRACT: We document producer price adjustment using a low-inflation micro price dataset. On average 24% of prices adjust each month, with an average increase/decrease of 6%. Producer prices adjust more frequently than consumer prices, but their size of adjustment is typically smaller. Sectoral heterogeneity in the frequency of price adjustment is strongly related to heterogeneity in the cost structure. Fluctuations in aggregate producer price inflation occur to a large extent through variation in the relative share of upward and downward price adjustment. Copyright © The editors of the "Scandinavian Journal of Economics" 2008 .
    Scandinavian Journal of Economics 02/2008; 110(3):489-518. · 0.51 Impact Factor
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    David Cornille, Maarten Dossche
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    ABSTRACT: We present a new approach to study empirically the effect of the introduction of the euro on currency invoicing. Our approach uses a compositional multinomial logit model, in which currency choice depends on the characteristics of both the currency and the country. We use unique quarterly panel data of Norwegian imports from OECD countries for the 1996-2006 period. One of the key findings is that the eurozone countries in trade with Norway have substantially increased their share of home currency invoicing after the introduction of the euro. In addition, the euro as a vehicle currency has overtaken the role of the US dollar in Norwegian imports. The econometric analysis shows a significant effect of euro introduction above and beyond the determinants of currency invoicing (i.e., inflation rate, inflation volatility, foreign exchange market size, and product composition). However, the rise in producer currency invoicing by eurozone countries is primarily caused by a drop in inflation volatility.
    National Bank of Belgium, Research series. 01/2006;
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    Luc Aucremann, David Cornille
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    ABSTRACT: Approximately 70% of Belgian consumer prices are to be considered as attractive prices, namely psychological prices, fractional prices - i. e. prices which are convenient to pay - and round prices. Conversion of these prices into euro generally leads to prices which are no longer attractive and it is very likely that retailers will round their prices to attractive euro prices. The public fears that rounding will be upward rather than symmetric. This paper simulates in the first instance a worst-case scenario, whereby all attractive BEF prices are systematically rounded up to the nearest attractive euro price. The effect on the consumer price index ranges from 0.54 to 0.72%. Such a scenario is however very unlikely, as factors such as competition on product markets, the currently prevailing demand conditions, the commitments made by organisations representing the enterprise sector and the vigilant attitude of consumers restrain the possibility of rounding up. In order to obtain a more realistic picture, the paper investigates in a second step whether rounding-up effects were found after the major change in VAT rates in April 1992. These effects seem marginal, although it should be acknowledged that it was difficult to isolate rounding effects from regular price changes. Any ex post assessment of the euro changeover will face a similar identification problem.
    12/2001;
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    Luc Aucremanne, David. Cornille
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    ABSTRACT: Approximately 70% of Belgian consumer prices are to be considered as attractive prices, namely psychological prices, fractional prices - i. e. prices which are convenient to pay - and round prices. Conversion of these prices into euro generally leads to prices which are no longer attractive and it is very likely that retailers will round their prices to attractive euro prices. The public fears that rounding will be upward rather than symmetric. This paper simulates in the first instance a worst-case scenario, whereby all attractive BEF prices are systematically rounded up to the nearest attractive euro price. The effect on the consumer price index ranges from 0.54 to 0.72%. Such a scenario is however very unlikely, as factors such as competition on product markets, the currently prevailing demand conditions, the commitments made by organisations representing the enterprise sector and the vigilant attitude of consumers restrain the possibility of rounding up. In order to obtain a more realistic picture, the paper investigates in a second step whether rounding-up effects were found after the major change in VAT rates in April 1992. These effects seem marginal, although it should be acknowledged that it was difficult to isolate rounding effects from regular price changes. Any ex post assessment of the euro changeover will face a similar identification problem.
    02/2001;
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    Luc Aucremanne, David Cornille