Seong-Keun Park

Chonnam National University Hospital, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (3)5.62 Total impact

  • Jungsoo Kim, Seong-Keun Park, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentration levels of pollutants (lead, and cadmium) in tissues (livers, kidneys, muscles, and bones) of shorebirds (Kentish Plovers (n = 5), Mongolian Plovers (n = 2), Dunlins (n = 6), Great Knots (n = 10), Terek Sandpipers (n = 10)) from Yeongjong Island, Korea in the East Asian-Australian migration flyways during the autumn migration in 1994-1995. Lead concentrations in livers, in kidneys, in muscles, and in bones were significantly different among shorebird species. Lead concentrations in livers of Kentish Plovers (4.76 +/- 2.72 microg/wet g), Mongolian Plovers (2.05 microg/wet g), Dunlins (3.77 +/- 1.07 microg/wet g), and Great Knots (4.27 +/- 3.19 microg/wet g) were less than the toxic level, and lead concentrations in livers of Terek Sandpipers (1.20 +/- 0.94 microg/wet g) were at the background level. Cadmium concentrations in livers, in kidneys, in muscles, and in bones did not vary among shorebirds, and concentrations of cadmium in livers and in kidneys were at background level (respectively, approximate 1 mug/wet g, approximate 2.67 microg/wet g) in all shorebird species. We suggest that interspecific differences of lead and cadmium concentrations were attributed to differences in exposure time and differences of diet, microhabitats in wintering ground. In livers and kidney of shorebirds from Yeongjong Island, lead and cadmium concentrations were higher than other locations previously reported.
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 12/2007; 134(1-3):355-61. · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Seong-Keun Park, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentration levels of trace metals and pollutants (zinc, manganese, copper, lead, and cadmium) in tissues (livers, kidneys, muscles, and bones) of shorebirds from Yeongjong Island, Korea, in the East Asian-Australian migration flyways. Essential trace elements, zinc concentrations in kidneys, and copper concentrations in muscles significantly differed among shorebirds, but manganese concentrations did not differ in each tissue. We suggest that essential elements are within normal range and are maintained there by normal homeostatic mechanism. Lead concentrations in livers, kidneys, muscles, and bones were significantly different among shorebird species. Lead concentrations in livers of Kentish Plovers, Mongolian Plovers, Dunlins, and Great Knots were less than the toxic level, and lead concentrations in livers of Terek Sandpipers were at the background level. Cadmium concentrations in livers, kidneys, muscles, and bones did not vary among shorebirds, and concentrations of cadmium in livers and kidneys were at background level in all shorebirds. In livers of Dunlins from Yeongjong Island, lead and cadmium concentrations were higher than other locations previously reported.
    Ecotoxicology 07/2007; 16(5):403-10. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report an 18-year-old man who presented with a sudden onset of headache followed by left hemianopia. A brain CT scan showed intracerebral haemorrhage in the left frontoparietal area, but a cerebral angiogram and MRI revealed no vascular anomaly. The patient was managed conservatively and his headache and visual loss improved over time. Hypertension in the form of paroxysmal attacks led us to suspect phaeochromocytoma. Subsequently, the patient was diagnosed with an extra-adrenal phaeochromocytoma in the left para-aortic area following endocrinological evaluation, abdominal CT scan and (131)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The patient presented here illustrates the importance of a careful search for a remediable cause of hypertension in children and young adults with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 05/2006; 13(3):388-90. · 1.25 Impact Factor