Nabil Gmada

Université de Jendouba, Souq el Arba, Jundūbah, Tunisia

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Publications (14)9.75 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: was to investigate the relative and absolute reliability of cross over (COP) and maximal lipid oxidation (LIPOXmax) points during treadmill running in sedentary healthy subjects.
    Science & Sports. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: the purpose of this study was to examine the effect of kickboxing training on physical fitness. Methods: 30 subjects were randomized into a kickboxing-group (n=15) and control group (n=15). Each group trained approximately 1-hour per day, three-times per a week during five weeks. Musclepower (upper-body: bench-press-test, medicineball-test; lower-body: squat-jump and countermovement-jump-test), flexibility, speed and agility, aerobic (progressive maximal exercise test), anaerobic fitness (Wingate test) and body composition were assessed before and after the training period. Results: the kickboxing group showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) in upper-body muscle power, aerobic power, anaerobic fitness, flexibility, speed and agility after training whereas body composition, squat jump and counter movement jump (height, power and velocity components) did not change for both groups. Conclusion: kickboxing-practice was effective to change many physical variables. Thus, this activity can be useful for enhancing physical fitness, but complementary activities and/or nutritional interventions should be necessary.
    Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal. 07/2014; 4(2):106 - 113.
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study was to analyze the time structure of high-level kickboxing matches. A total of 45 combats from two male World Championships were monitored using a time motion analysis system. The combat time structure (i.e., high-intensity activity: HIA; low-intensity activity: LIA; and referee breaks or pauses) during competition and weight divisions was determined and compared. Results indicated that the time structures were HIA: 2.2+/- 1.2 s; LIA: 2.3+/- 0.8 s; pauses: 5.4+/- 4.3 s; and 3.4+/-1.2 s between two subsequent HIA. The fighting to non-fighting ratio was found to be 1:1. Moreover, the number of HIA and LIA and the time of LIA decreased in latter rounds (e.g., the average number of HIA were 27.1+/-7.1, 25.1+/-6.6 and 24.9+/-6.1 respectively for round1, 2 and 3), meanwhile the time and number of pauses increased (e.g., the average pause times were 12.8+/-11.4, 22.3+/-22.6 and 24.6+/-23.3s respectively for round1, 2 and 3). The activity times did not differ among weight categories. The present results confirm the intermittent nature of kickboxing competition and provide coaches with more information on how to structure training sessions to mimic the physical demands in competition.
    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 06/2014; · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study was to analyze the time structure of high-level kickboxing matches. A total of 45 combats from two male World Championships were monitored using a time motion analysis system. The combat time structure (i.e., high-intensity activity: HIA; low-intensity activity: LIA; and referee breaks or pauses) during competition and weight divisions was determined and compared. Results indicated that the time structures were HIA: 2.2± 1.2 s; LIA: 2.3± 0.8 s; pauses: 5.4± 4.3 s; and 3.4±1.2 s between two subsequent HIA. The fighting to non-fighting ratio was found to be 1:1. Moreover, the number of HIA and LIA and the time of LIA decreased in latter rounds (e.g., the average number of HIA were 27.1±7.1, 25.1±6.6 and 24.9±6.1 respectively for round1, 2 and 3), meanwhile the time and number of pauses increased (e.g., the average pause times were 12.8±11.4, 22.3±22.6 and 24.6±23.3s respectively for round1, 2 and 3). The activity times did not differ among weight categories. The present results confirm the intermittent nature of kickboxing competition and provide coaches with more information on how to structure training sessions to mimic the physical demands in competition.
    Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: to verify whether active recovery (AR) applied after a kickboxing match resulted in better performance in anaerobic tests when compared to passive recovery (PR). Methods: Eighteen kickboxers volunteered to participate on a Kickboxing match preceded and followed by anaerobic tests: squat jump (SJ), the counter movement jump (CMJ) and the upper-body Wingate test. Blood lactate (BL), heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were analyzed before and after rounds. The recovery sessions consisted of 10min at 50% of maximal aerobic speed or PR. [BL] were measured at 3, 5 and 10 min after the match, while HR, RPE and anaerobic power were assessed after the recovery‘s period. Results: [BL], HR and RPE increased significantly (P< 0.001) during the match. [BL] was lower (P < 0.001) after AR compared to PR at 5 min and 10 min (e.g., AR: 8.94 ± 0.31 mmol.l-1, PR: 10.98 ± 0.33 mmol.l-1). However, PR resulted in higher (P <0.05) upper-body mean power (4.65 ± 0.5 W.kg-1) compared to AR (4.09 ± 0.5 W.kg-1), while SJ and CMJ were not affected by the recovery type. Conclusion: The lactate removal was improved with AR when compared with PR, but AR did not improve subsequent performance.
    Asian Journal of Sports Medicine (AsJSM). 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: the purpose of this study was to examine the effect of kickboxing training on physical fitness.
    Muscle, Ligaments and Tendons Journal. 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to analyze the technical and tactical aspects of high level Kickboxing matches. A total of 45 matches (135 rounds) from the World Championship 2009 and 2011 of male kickboxers were analyzed using notational analysis system to determine the technical and tactical aspects (i.e., offensive, defensive techniques and combined actions) considering combat rounds, weight divisions and match outcome. Kickboxers were engaged in offensive actions more than defensive ones (P<0.001). The most used techniques were straight punches, roundhouse kick, block/parry and foot defense (P<0.001), while punch combinations were the most used combination type. Winners used more offensive (i.e., hook punches), defensive techniques (i.e., foot defense and clinch) and punch combinations than losers. Significant interation effect of weight category, match outcome and rounds were found on offensive and defensive techniques. The activity in international kickboxing competitions was modulated by weight categories with a significant effect of combat stage. Winners applied more offensives and defensives techniques than defeated athletes. Our findings suggest that to win a match, athletes should be motivated by developing the most used offensives techniques and coaches should structure specific training to maintain a high rate of techniques 'delivery during the combat.
    International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport 08/2013; 13(2):294-309. · 0.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our study aimed to assess the influence of protocol on the crossover point and maximal fat-oxidation (LIPOX(max)) values in sedentary, but otherwise healthy, young men. Maximal oxygen intake was assessed in 23 subjects, using a progressive maximal cycle ergometer test. Twelve sedentary males (aged 20.5±1.0 years) whose directly measured maximal aerobic power (MAP) values were lower than their theoretical maximal values (tMAP) were selected from this group. These individuals performed, in random sequence, three submaximal graded exercise tests, separated by three-day intervals; work rates were based on the tMAP in one test and on MAP in the remaining two. The third test was used to assess the reliability of data. Heart rate, respiratory parameters, blood lactate, the crossover point and LIPOX(max) values were measured during each of these tests. The crossover point and LIPOX(max) values were significantly lower when the testing protocol was based on tMAP rather than on MAP (P<0.001). Respiratory exchange ratios were significantly lower with MAP than with tMAP at 30, 40, 50 and 60% of maximal aerobic power (P<0.01). At the crossover point, lactate and 5-min postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC(5 min)) values were significantly higher using tMAP rather than MAP (P<0.001). During the first 5 min of recovery, EPOC(5 min) and blood lactate were significantly correlated (r=0.89; P<0.001). Our data show that, to assess the crossover point and LIPOX(max) values for research purposes, the protocol must be based on the measured MAP rather than on a theoretical value. Such a determination should improve individualization of training for initially sedentary subjects.
    Diabetes & Metabolism 09/2011; 38(1):40-5. · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The study investigated physical fitness characteristics of elite Taekwondo (TKD) players as well as their heart rate (HR) response and blood lactate concentration changes during TKD specific exercises and simulated competition.
    Science & Sports - SCI SPORT. 01/2006; 21(5):285-290.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different modalities of individualized active recovery on blood lactate disappearance after supramaximal exercise in subjects with different levels of aerobic fitness. Fourteen healthy subjects (7 trained and 7 untrained subjects mean age 20 +/- 1.5 and 19.5 +/- 1.5, respectively) participated in this study. They performed three supramaximal intermittent exercises at 60 % of the time to exhaustion at 120 % of the maximum aerobic power (MAP) with 5-min recovery periods (2 x 5 min). The third exercise was followed by 20 min of recovery. The effects of four types of recovery were compared in trained and untrained subjects: passive recovery (PR), an active recovery at an intensity corresponding to the first anaerobic ventilatory threshold minus 20 % (VT1), an active recovery at an intensity corresponding to the second anaerobic ventilatory threshold minus 20 % (VT2) and a combined active recovery (CR) which consisted of 7 min at VT2 followed by 13 min at VT1. Blood lactate levels were measured at rest and during the recovery periods. Peak blood lactate after supramaximal exercise was observed significantly earlier with VT2 and CR (4th min) than VT1 and PR (7th min) in trained and in untrained subjects. Combined active recovery (CR) showed a significantly faster lactate disappearance than did PR, VT1, or VT2 from the 7th min of recovery in trained subjects (p < 0.05) and at the 20th min in untrained subjects (p < 0.05). CR and VT2 conditions showed earlier peak blood lactate (4th min) than PR or VT1 (7th min). Blood lactate disappearance was faster in trained than untrained subjects during combined active recovery. This result suggests that the level of physical fitness plays an important role mainly in the pattern of blood lactate decrease during combined active recovery.
    International Journal of Sports Medicine 12/2005; 26(10):874-9. · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. – Determine the kinetics of gas exchange, heart rate (HR) and blood lactate concentration [La] during and after supramaximal intermittent individualized exercises in trained (TR) and untrained (UTR) subjects.Methods.– 14 subjects (7 trained and 7 untrained subjects) performed three repetitions of an exercise corresponding to 60% of time to exhaustion at 120% of the aerobic maximum power on a cycle ergometer (MedGraphics/Excalibur, USA). The two first exercises were separated by 5 min recovery. The third exercise was followed by 20 min recovery. The oxygen uptake was measured continuously using a breath by breath device (Medgraphics/CPX). Blood was taken from fingers during recoveries for lactate analyzis.Results. – Results showed that oxygen uptake (VO2 ml/minute, P
    Science & Sports - SCI SPORT. 01/2005; 20(3):111-118.
  • International Journal of Sports Medicine 01/2005; 26:1-6. · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. – Determine the influence of physical fitness level on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption after supramaximal-intermittent exercise.Method. – Fourteen subjects (seven trained and seven sedentary subjects) performed three repetitions of an exercise corresponding to 60% of time to exhaustion at 120% of the maximum aerobic power, with two recovery periods of 5 min each. The third exercise was followed by 20 min of recovery. The oxygen uptake was measured continuously using a breath-by-breath device. Blood samples were taken from fingers during recoveries for lactate analyses.Results. – The excess post-exercise oxygen consumption increased gradually during recovery in trained subjects (P
    Science & Sports - SCI SPORT. 01/2004; 19(4):183-188.
  • Science & Sports 01/2004; 19:183-188. · 0.49 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

33 Citations
9.75 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • Université de Jendouba
      Souq el Arba, Jundūbah, Tunisia
  • 2004–2006
    • Institut Supérieur du Sport et de l’Education Physique
      Şafāqis, Şafāqis, Tunisia