N. Gmada

Université de Jendouba, Souq el Arba, Jundūbah, Tunisia

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Publications (11)14.42 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: was to investigate the relative and absolute reliability of cross over (COP) and maximal lipid oxidation (LIPOXmax) points during treadmill running in sedentary healthy subjects.
    Science & Sports 09/2014; · 0.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to analyze the technical and tactical aspects of high level Kickboxing matches. A total of 45 matches (135 rounds) from the World Championship 2009 and 2011 of male kickboxers were analyzed using notational analysis system to determine the technical and tactical aspects (i.e., offensive, defensive techniques and combined actions) considering combat rounds, weight divisions and match outcome. Kickboxers were engaged in offensive actions more than defensive ones (P<0.001). The most used techniques were straight punches, roundhouse kick, block/parry and foot defense (P<0.001), while punch combinations were the most used combination type. Winners used more offensive (i.e., hook punches), defensive techniques (i.e., foot defense and clinch) and punch combinations than losers. Significant interation effect of weight category, match outcome and rounds were found on offensive and defensive techniques. The activity in international kickboxing competitions was modulated by weight categories with a significant effect of combat stage. Winners applied more offensives and defensives techniques than defeated athletes. Our findings suggest that to win a match, athletes should be motivated by developing the most used offensives techniques and coaches should structure specific training to maintain a high rate of techniques 'delivery during the combat.
    International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport 08/2013; 13(2):294-309. · 0.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE:: To assess the influence of Ramadan fasting on maximal performance of moderately trained young men using various tests of muscle performance. DESIGN:: Comparison of Ramadan fasting (n = 10) versus control group (n = 10) over 3 test sessions, before Ramadan (B), at the end of the first week of Ramadan (R-1), and during the fourth week of Ramadan (R-4). SETTING:: At each 2-day test session, 4 tests were performed in the same order: measurement of vertical jump height (VJH) and a force-velocity test using the arms on day 1, and measurement of handgrip force (HGF), and a force-velocity test using the legs on day 2. PARTICIPANTS:: Twenty trained men. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:: Maximal power of the arms and of the legs (force-velocity testing), vertical jump performance, HGF, anthropometric data, dietary intake, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. RESULTS:: Two-way analyses of variance (group × time) showed Ramadan fasters with decreased maximal anaerobic power of the arms (Wmax-A) and legs (Wmax-L) at R-1, with a partial return of arm data to initial values at R-4. VJH and HGF remained unchanged throughout. Other changes in Ramadan observers were a decreased energy intake and a decrease of plasma volume at R-1. CONCLUSIONS:: These results suggest that Ramadan observance initially had detrimental effects on Wmax-A, and Wmax-L, with a tendency to recovery by week 4 of Ramadan. Reductions of total energy intake and intramuscular glycogen may contribute to the reduced Wmax-A and Wmax-L during Ramadan fasting.
    Clinical journal of sport medicine: official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine 11/2012; · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our study aimed to assess the influence of protocol on the crossover point and maximal fat-oxidation (LIPOX(max)) values in sedentary, but otherwise healthy, young men. Maximal oxygen intake was assessed in 23 subjects, using a progressive maximal cycle ergometer test. Twelve sedentary males (aged 20.5±1.0 years) whose directly measured maximal aerobic power (MAP) values were lower than their theoretical maximal values (tMAP) were selected from this group. These individuals performed, in random sequence, three submaximal graded exercise tests, separated by three-day intervals; work rates were based on the tMAP in one test and on MAP in the remaining two. The third test was used to assess the reliability of data. Heart rate, respiratory parameters, blood lactate, the crossover point and LIPOX(max) values were measured during each of these tests. The crossover point and LIPOX(max) values were significantly lower when the testing protocol was based on tMAP rather than on MAP (P<0.001). Respiratory exchange ratios were significantly lower with MAP than with tMAP at 30, 40, 50 and 60% of maximal aerobic power (P<0.01). At the crossover point, lactate and 5-min postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC(5 min)) values were significantly higher using tMAP rather than MAP (P<0.001). During the first 5 min of recovery, EPOC(5 min) and blood lactate were significantly correlated (r=0.89; P<0.001). Our data show that, to assess the crossover point and LIPOX(max) values for research purposes, the protocol must be based on the measured MAP rather than on a theoretical value. Such a determination should improve individualization of training for initially sedentary subjects.
    Diabetes & Metabolism 09/2011; 38(1):40-5. · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine whether measurement of peak anaerobic power (Wpeak) by force-velocity test using the arms or the legs influenced the performance obtained when the opposite muscle group was tested. Ten trained male throwers (age: 20.6 +/- 2; stature: 1.82 +/- 0.06 m; and body mass: 85.5 +/- 17.2 kg) performed, on separate days, 2 Monark cycle-ergometer protocols comprising (a) arm cranking (A1) followed by a leg cycling (L2) force-velocity test (series A-L) and (b) a leg cycling (L1) followed by an arm cranking (A2) force-velocity test (series L-A). On each day, 8 minutes of seated rest separated the 2 force-velocity tests. Arterialized capillary blood was collected from the finger tips for blood lactate analysis at rest and at the end of each force-velocity test. Wpeak-A1 and Wpeak-A2 were similar (8.1 +/- 1.7 and 8.6 +/- 1.5 W.kg, respectively). Wpeak-L1 and Wpeak-L2 were 14.0 +/- 3 and 13.4 +/- 2.8 W.kg (NS). Blood [La] increased significantly after each force-velocity test (p < 0.001), but peak blood [La] did not differ significantly between L1 (6.6 +/- 1.2) and L2 (6.2 +/- 1.4 mmol.L) or between A1 (7.2 +/- 1.0) and A2 (7.4 +/- 1.6 mmol.L). In this population, force-velocity tests performed using the legs or the arms did not induce a significant decrease in force-velocity determinations of peak anaerobic power performed subsequently with the opposite muscle group. In strength-trained athletes, the force-velocity approach can thus be used to measure the peak power output of both the legs and the arms in a single laboratory session, without adversely affecting estimates of an athlete's performance.
    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 03/2010; 24(4):992-8. · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The study investigated physical fitness characteristics of elite Taekwondo (TKD) players as well as their heart rate (HR) response and blood lactate concentration changes during TKD specific exercises and simulated competition.
    Science & Sports 10/2006; 21(5):285-290. · 0.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different modalities of individualized active recovery on blood lactate disappearance after supramaximal exercise in subjects with different levels of aerobic fitness. Fourteen healthy subjects (7 trained and 7 untrained subjects mean age 20 +/- 1.5 and 19.5 +/- 1.5, respectively) participated in this study. They performed three supramaximal intermittent exercises at 60 % of the time to exhaustion at 120 % of the maximum aerobic power (MAP) with 5-min recovery periods (2 x 5 min). The third exercise was followed by 20 min of recovery. The effects of four types of recovery were compared in trained and untrained subjects: passive recovery (PR), an active recovery at an intensity corresponding to the first anaerobic ventilatory threshold minus 20 % (VT1), an active recovery at an intensity corresponding to the second anaerobic ventilatory threshold minus 20 % (VT2) and a combined active recovery (CR) which consisted of 7 min at VT2 followed by 13 min at VT1. Blood lactate levels were measured at rest and during the recovery periods. Peak blood lactate after supramaximal exercise was observed significantly earlier with VT2 and CR (4th min) than VT1 and PR (7th min) in trained and in untrained subjects. Combined active recovery (CR) showed a significantly faster lactate disappearance than did PR, VT1, or VT2 from the 7th min of recovery in trained subjects (p < 0.05) and at the 20th min in untrained subjects (p < 0.05). CR and VT2 conditions showed earlier peak blood lactate (4th min) than PR or VT1 (7th min). Blood lactate disappearance was faster in trained than untrained subjects during combined active recovery. This result suggests that the level of physical fitness plays an important role mainly in the pattern of blood lactate decrease during combined active recovery.
    International Journal of Sports Medicine 12/2005; 26(10):874-9. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. – Determine the kinetics of gas exchange, heart rate (HR) and blood lactate concentration [La] during and after supramaximal intermittent individualized exercises in trained (TR) and untrained (UTR) subjects.Methods.– 14 subjects (7 trained and 7 untrained subjects) performed three repetitions of an exercise corresponding to 60% of time to exhaustion at 120% of the aerobic maximum power on a cycle ergometer (MedGraphics/Excalibur, USA). The two first exercises were separated by 5 min recovery. The third exercise was followed by 20 min recovery. The oxygen uptake was measured continuously using a breath by breath device (Medgraphics/CPX). Blood was taken from fingers during recoveries for lactate analyzis.Results. – Results showed that oxygen uptake (VO2 ml/minute, P
    Science & Sports 06/2005; 20(3):111-118. · 0.54 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Sports Medicine 01/2005; 26:1-6. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. – Determine the influence of physical fitness level on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption after supramaximal-intermittent exercise.Method. – Fourteen subjects (seven trained and seven sedentary subjects) performed three repetitions of an exercise corresponding to 60% of time to exhaustion at 120% of the maximum aerobic power, with two recovery periods of 5 min each. The third exercise was followed by 20 min of recovery. The oxygen uptake was measured continuously using a breath-by-breath device. Blood samples were taken from fingers during recoveries for lactate analyses.Results. – The excess post-exercise oxygen consumption increased gradually during recovery in trained subjects (P
    Science & Sports 08/2004; 19(4):183-188. · 0.54 Impact Factor
  • Science & Sports 01/2004; 19:183-188. · 0.54 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

44 Citations
14.42 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • Université de Jendouba
      Souq el Arba, Jundūbah, Tunisia
  • 2004–2006
    • Institut Supérieur du Sport et de l’Education Physique
      Şafāqis, Şafāqis, Tunisia