Israel Marinho Pereira

Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Tejuco, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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Publications (17)5.23 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Studies dealing with the interference of weeds in agro-ecosystems have obtained abundant results for grain production fields and pastures. However, few studies have reported the effect of the presence of such a group of isolated plants on degraded areas under recovery. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the influence of the soil seed bank on the process of environmental restoration of a representative area of campestre cerrado due to the presence of weed grasses. To assess the seed bank, three environments were selected: two degraded environments and one reference-environment (preserved) of campestre cerrado. Soil samples were collected in two seasons (dry and wet), and evaluated in three hundred days. During the evaluation, only six native species and only two species with a habit of arboreal life were found. Most of the seeds which were germinated for the degraded environments in both collections were identified as invasive in the study area. In this sense, the local soil seed bank is not considered sufficient for recovery through ecological succession in these areas, and the use of techniques to accelerate the restoration of these environments is strongly recommended.
    Planta Daninha 06/2013; 31(2):303-312.
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    ABSTRACT: A espécie Lychnophora pohlii Sch. Bip.(Asteraceae), conhecida como "Arnica mineira", é uma planta largamente utilizada na medicina popular e muito abundante na vegetação de campo rupestre de altitude. Nesse contexto, este trabalho teve como objetivo estudar a densidade dessa espécie e sua relação entre os parâmetros do solo em uma área de campo rupestre em Diamantina, região do Alto Jequitinhonha, Minas Gerais. Foram alocadas 10 plotas contíguas de 20 x 50 m, totalizando uma amostragem de 10.000 m2, localizadas dentro do Campus Juscelino Kubitschek da Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (UFVJM). Nessas plotas, os indivíduos foram avaliados quanto à frequência, dominância e densidade. Estudou-se a relação da densidade dessa espécie com nove atributos químicos e físicos do solo por meio da análise de correspondência canônica (ACC). A maior abundância de indivíduos (I) da espécie Lychnophora pohlii Sch. Bip. foi verificada nas plotas de amostragem da vegetação de número 6, com 255 indivíduos; 7, com 173; 8, com 189; 9, com 159; e 1, com 151. Verificaram-se nessas plotas características florísticas e do solo semelhantes, resultando em uma proximidade espacial quando representadas nos diagramas da ACC. Maiores densidades da espécie Lychnophora pohlii Sch. Bip. foram encontradas em plotas com os maiores valores de pH, P-rem e saturação por bases, variáveis essas mais fortemente correlacionadas pelo primeiro eixo da análise de correspondência canônica.
    Revista Brasileira de Ciência do Solo 06/2013; 37(3):565-571. · 0.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This work aimed to verify the existence of variations in composition and distribution of tree species due to soil characteristics in a fragment of dystrophic savanna in Curvelo-MG. On description in the compartment of the phanerophytes of this plant community, were installed ten permanent plots with 1.000 m2 (20 x 50 m) with fixed distances of 100 m between each plot. All alive individuals that had diameter at soil height (DSH - diameter to 0.3 m from ground level) > 5.0 cm were sampled. The Individuals with multiple boles were sampled when the value of square root of the sum-square of DSH had been greater than criterion of the inventory. Were collected Soil samples at two depths (0-20 e 20-40 cm) and was measured the distances of plots of a watercourse. To study the community were generated ordination diagrams of plots, species and environmental variables by means of a canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). The richness sampled was 92 species, 36 families and 74 genera, Erythroxylum, Byrsonima, Myrcia and Qualea. Jackknife estimators (first and second order) designed a wealth of 106.4 and 107.8 species. The species Magonia pubescens, Terminalia argentea, Annona crassiflora, Eugenia dysenterica e Xylopia aromatica were distribuited underneath the environmental gradient.
    Cerne 06/2013; 19(2):201-211. · 0.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Historically, forest landscapes have been modified by human activities, causing its destruction and fragmentation to exploit its resources. However, forests play a vital role in protecting the environment, especially on slops, hilltops, lakes, springs and river banks. This study aimed to understand the diversity and structure of vegetation on a slope of riparian forest in Bocaina de Minas, MG and identify key environmental variables that influence the spatial distribution of individual trees. An inventory of the tree community was conducted, in which ten of 10m×40m plots were allocated and systematically distributed throughout the study area. All individuals existing shrubs and trees within the plots with 1.30m diameter ≥ 5.0cm of soil were sampled in order to generate information on the horizontal structure, richness and diversity of the community. Variables related to the substrata were obtained for each plot from the topography and laboratory analysis of soil samples (pH, levels of P, K, Ca, Mg and Al, base saturation (V), organic matter and levels of sand, silt and clay). Other variables such as distance from the river and successional stage of the plots, were also evaluated. In order to correlate environmental variables with the abundance distribution of the species, a canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and Spearman correlation were used. The Shannon diversity index (H') and evenness index (J') obtained were 3.53 and 0.76, respectively. The emerging patterns of environmental variables and the abundance of species indicate that these were distributed throughout the fragment, mainly due to the P content in soil and successional stage of the plots. In addition, several species have produced significant correlations between their abundance in the plots and the variables related to successional stage, variations in soil, and distance from the banks of water courses.
    Ciência Rural 12/2012; 42(12):2192-2198. · 0.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper mapped and characterized the forest remnants in the domain of UFLA and identified potentials corridors toimprove the connectivity among them. The thematic map for the analyses was built using the SPRING 3.4 program considering aerialimages (2001) and satellite images (Landsat 7, March of 2001). The fragments impacts were analyzed by the application of investigativequestionnaires in order to record the past anthropogenic disturbances. The shrub-tree vegetation of the six main fragments wasinventoried by the quadrants method, with the inclusion level considering trees with DBH higher or equal to 5.0 cm. The fragments Iand IV were respectively the most disturbed fragments. According to the thematic map, the fragment I showed the smallest area, formindex and core area, consequently, the largest edge effect. The fragment III showed the largest area, form index and core area and thesmallest edge effect. Among the main impacts registered, the most important were garbage, external highways, trails and buildconstructions. In the six main fragments 544 individuals were registered, belonging to 48 families, 110 genera and 161 species. Thelargest diversity value was registered in the fragment III (3.917) and the smallest (2.135) in the fragment I. A low similarity wasdetected among the fragments. After the analysis of the results, the connectivity among the fragments was verified with the recoveringof the areas of permanent preservation along the water streams and dams.
    Cerne. 01/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: This work aimed at evaluating the natural regeneration dynamics in two springs in process of recovery in Lavras-MG, surrounded in December/2003. To do that, two springs were carried out from August/2005 (18 months) to April/2006 (24 months). 122 plots in the total of 5 x 5m (25m2) were plotted, being 76 plots in spring 1 and 46 plots in spring 2. The plots were distributed systematically throughout all the area of the springs. All individuals with height larger than 0.10 m and DBH lower than 5 cm were identified, having their diameters and height measured. Floristic composition, structural analyses and natural regeneration dynamics were studied. In the total, 524 individuals from 24 family and 55 species were sampled. The Asteraceae family was distinguished in species number in spring 1 and the families Fabaceae Faboideae, Myrtaceae and Solanaceae in spring 2. The species Baccharis dracunculifolia and Vernonia ferruginea presented the highest natural regeneration indexes in spring 1, while the species Vernonia polyanthes and Nectandra nitidula in spring 2. The higher diversity index was registered for the spring 2 in the second evaluation, having an increase from 3,324 (first evaluation) to 3,384 (second evaluation). The floristic similarity index registered between the springs was of 20.0% and 18.5% for the evaluations 1 and 2, respectively. During the time of monitoring, it was verified a significant increase of 33.33% and 15.8% in individuals number sampled in springs 1 and 2, respectively. The natural regeneration method presents potential for the recovering of the vegetation of the two springs; however, it is necessary the adoption of control techniques of Brachiaria sp. grass.
    Ciência Florestal (ISSN: 0103-9954) Vol 19 Num 2. 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Biological contamination is currently one of the main causes of biodiversity loss on the planet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impacts caused by P. juliflora invasion on caatinga phytodiversity in Monteiro Municipality, in both the adult stratum and natural regeneration. Twenty plots of 400 m2 were set up, 10 in a conserved caatinga fragment (Environment I) and 10 in a caatinga area invaded by P. juliflora (Environment II). The invaded area was much poorer in relation to the conserved area for all parameters investigated. The impacts caused by the alien species were felt in structure as well in community biological diversity. The relative density of P. juliflora in the adult stratum of the invaded area was ca. 90%, which reflects its capacity to compete and eliminate other species. The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (H') had values of 2.81 and 0.61 for the adult component of Environments I and II, respectively. For natural regeneration, this index was 2.31 and 1.14 for the same sites. It was concluded that P. juliflora forms dense populations that grow along with native species, severely affecting the floristic composition, diversity and structure of autochthonous communities.
    Acta Botanica Brasilica 12/2006; 20(4):887-898. · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Floristic composition and vegetation structure of plants 3 cm stem diameter or greater were compared at four sites in the Agreste of Paraiba, Brazil: (1) little disturbed for five decades (LD); (2) grazed fragment, selectively logged 16 years before sampling (GF); (3) naturally regrowing for 30 years after 39 years of agriculture (OR); and (4) naturally regrowing for 20 years after 35 years of agriculture plus 15 years of pasture (NR). Cattle graze frequently in the last three sites but very seldom in LD. The little disturbed site had more species (53) than the other three sites (36, 25, and 11 species in GF, OG, and NG, respectively) and also more (3253, 2780, 2780, and 2115 plants/ha) and larger plants (34.8, 26.8, 18.6, and 7.8 m2/ha), including taller tree species (up to 15 m) absent in the other sites (maximum height: 14, 6, and 5 m). Differences were striking in relation to NR, the site with longer use and shorter regrowth period, which was strongly dominated by only two species: Mimosa tenuiflora (73% relative density and 81% basal area) and Piptadenia stipulacea (21% relative density and 16% basal area). These results indicate that abandoned agricultural sites may take several decades to reestablish vegetation similar to die original.RESUMOForam comparadas a composição florística e a estrutura da vegetação das plantas com dia̧metro do caule S 3 cm, em quatro áreas no Agreste da Paraíba: (1) pouco perturbada por cinco décadas (LD); (2) fragmento pastejado que teve corte seletivo de árvores 16 anos antes da amostragem (GF); (3) revegetação natural por 30 anos depois de 39 anos de agricultura (OR); e (4) revegetação natural por 20 anos depois de 35 anos de agricultura e 15 anos como pasto plantado (NR). Gado bovino pasta frequentemente nas trȩs últimas áreas e só raramente em LD. A área pouco perturbada tinha maior número de espécies (53) que as outras trés áreas (36, 25 e 11 espécies em GF, OR e NR, respectivamente), além de plantas em maior número (3253, 2780, 2780 e 2115 plantas/ha) e de maior tamanho (34.8, 26.8, 18.6 e 7.8 m2/ha), incluindo espécies arbóreas mais alias (até 15 m), ausentes nas outras áreas (alturas máximas de 14, 6 e 5 m). As diferenças foram marcantes em relação a NR, área com maior tempo de uso e menor tempo de revegetação, e dominada por apenas duas espécies: Mimosa tenuiflora (densidade e área basal relativas de 73 e 81%) e Piptadenia stipulacea (21% de densidade e 16% de área basal). Os resultados indicam que as áreas de agricultura abandonadas podem levar décadas até estabelecerem vegetação semelhante á original.
    Biotropica 03/2006; 35(2):154 - 165. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    Israel Marinho Pereira
    01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: 2 , sendo 10 em um remanescente de caatinga bem conservada (Ambiente I) e 10 em uma área de caatinga invadida por P. juliflora (Ambiente II). A área invadida apresentou-se muito mais pobre em relação à primeira, em todos os parâmetros avaliados. Os impactos causados pela invasora foram sentidos tanto na estrutura, quanto na diversidade biológica da comunidade. A Densidade Relativa de P. juliflora no estrato adulto da área invadida atingiu cerca de 90%, o que reflete a sua capacidade de competição e eliminação das demais espécies. O índice de diversidade de Shannon-Weaver (H') apresentou os valores de 2,81 e 0,61 para o componente adulto dos Ambientes I e II, respectivamente. Para a regeneração natural os valores desse índice foram de 2,31 e 1,14 para os mesmos Ambientes. Conclui-se que P. juliflora forma densos maciços populacionais e compete com as espécies nativas, afetando severamente a composição florística, a diversidade e a estrutura das comunidades autóctones invadidas. Palavras-chave: contaminação biológica, Prosopis juliflora, perda de biodiversidade, caatinga ABSTRACT - (Effects of the biological invasion of algaroba - Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC. on composition and structure of the shrub- tree stratum of the caatinga in Monteiro Municipality, Paraíba State, Brazil). Biological contamination is currently one of the main causes of biodiversity loss on the planet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impacts caused by P. juliflora invasion on caatinga phytodiversity in Monteiro Municipality, in both the adult stratum and natural regeneration. Twenty plots of 400 m 2 were set up, 10 in a conserved caatinga fragment (Environment I) and 10 in a caatinga area invaded by P. juliflora (Environment II). The invaded area was much poorer in relation to the conserved area for all parameters investigated. The impacts caused by the alien species were felt in structure as well in community biological diversity. The relative density of P. juliflora in the adult stratum of the invaded area was ca. 90%, which reflects its capacity to compete and eliminate other species. The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (H') had values of 2.81 and 0.61 for the adult component of Environments I and II, respectively. For natural regeneration, this index was 2.31 and 1.14 for the same sites. It was concluded that P. juliflora forms dense populations that grow along with native species, severely affecting the floristic composition, diversity and structure of autochthonous communities
    Acta Botanica Brasilica - ACTA BOT BRAS. 01/2006; 20(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the efficiency of the natural regeneration process, as a method of riparian forest rehabilitation surrounding anthropized water spring. The work was conducted in two water springs. The spring 1 is located in Lavras-MG county and 2 in Itumirim-MG county. This last one presented two quite different situations; part of it was classified as disturbed area and part classified as degraded area. For evaluating the floristic composition and structure of the natural regeneration, 37 portions of 10 x 2,0 m, in the Spring 1, and, 74 portions in Spring 2, 37 in each area, were plotted. All individuals with DBH lower than 5 cm and height higher than 0.10 m were registered and identified. Aspects related to physiognomic structure were analyzed (density, frequency and distribution of the heights of the plants in size classes) and communitarian (composition and diversity). For the two springs, 528 and 593 individuals in the first and second evaluation, respectively, were registered. However, in relation to the number of species, it was not verified any change between the first and the second evaluation (46 species). It was observed that, seven months after the isolation of the area, a significant increase of 9. 5%, 11,8% and 17% in the spring 1 and in spring 2 disturbed area and in spring 2 degraded area, respectively. The results indicate that natural regeneration is efficient for recovering disturbed and degraded springs.
    Cerne. 01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the efficiency of the natural regeneration process, as a method of riparian forest rehabilitation surrounding anthropized water spring. The work was conducted in two water springs. The spring 1 is located in Lavras-MG county and 2 in Itumirim-MG county. This last one presented two quite different situations; part of it was classified as disturbed area and part classified as degraded area. For evaluating the floristic composition and structure of the natural regeneration, 37 portions of 10 x 2,0 m, in the Spring 1, and, 74 portions in Spring 2, 37 in each area, were plotted. All individuals with DBH lower than 5 cm and height higher than 0.10 m were registered and identified. Aspects related to physiognomic structure were analyzed (density, frequency and distribution of the heights of the plants in size classes) and communitarian (composition and diversity). For the two springs, 528 and 593 individuals in the first and second evaluation, respectively, were registered. However, in relation to the number of species, it was not verified any change between the first and the second evaluation (46 species). It was observed that, seven months after the isolation of the area, a significant increase of 9. 5%, 11,8% and 17% in the spring 1 and in spring 2 disturbed area and in spring 2 degraded area, respectively. The results indicate that natural regeneration is efficient for recovering disturbed and degraded springs.
    Cerne 01/2006; 12(4):360-372. · 0.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: the study was carried out in two environments of caatinga, located in the experiment station of UFPB, in the county of São Joao do Cariri, PB (7º24"S; 36º32"W). It was installed 12 plots of 10x20m, distributed at random on each areas characterized as:. Area I - Bush-tree caatinga in good state of conservation, and Area II - Bush caatinga in advanced state of degradation. On each plot it was sampled all the individuals with BHS (Basis Height Circumference) 10cm. In Area I it was sampled 563 individuals, belonging eight families and 15 species, while in the Area II it was sampled only 356 individuals, four families and six species. The families Euphorbiaceae, Caesalpinaceae and Apocynaceae were highlighted in number of individuals. The species with the biggest IVI, in decreasing order, in Area I were Croton sonderianus Müll. Arg., Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul., Aspidosperma pyrifolium Mart. and Jatropha mollissima Müll. Arg.; and in Area II, following the same order: Jatropha mollissima, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Aspidosperma pyrifolium and Croton sonderianus. The largest difference between the area could be realized by the density which was reduced from 2.359 ind.ha-1 in area I to 1.470 ind.ha-1 in area II. Such results show the poverty on the soil vegetation cover and the fragility of degraded caatinga, making urgent the adaptation of special care to on intervention on these areas
    Cerne 01/2005; 11(3):253-262. · 0.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: the study was carried out in two environments of caatinga, located in the experiment station of UFPB, in the county ofSão Joao do Cariri, PB (7º24"S; 36º32"W). It was installed 12 plots of 10x20m, distributed at random on each areas characterizedas:. Area I - Bush-tree caatinga in good state of conservation, and Area II - Bush caatinga in advanced state of degradation. On eachplot it was sampled all the individuals with BHS (Basis Height Circumference) 10cm. In Area I it was sampled 563 individuals,belonging eight families and 15 species, while in the Area II it was sampled only 356 individuals, four families and six species. Thefamilies Euphorbiaceae, Caesalpinaceae and Apocynaceae were highlighted in number of individuals. The species with the biggest IVI,in decreasing order, in Area I were Croton sonderianus Müll. Arg., Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul., Aspidosperma pyrifolium Mart. andJatropha mollissima Müll. Arg.; and in Area II, following the same order: Jatropha mollissima, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Aspidospermapyrifolium and Croton sonderianus. The largest difference between the area could be realized by the density which was reduced from2.359 ind.ha-1 in area I to 1.470 ind.ha-1 in area II. Such results show the poverty on the soil vegetation cover and the fragility ofdegraded caatinga, making urgent the adaptation of special care to on intervention on these areas.
    Cerne. 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: A floristic and phytosociological survey was conducted in a caatinga area in the Agreste (sub-humid) region of Paraíba state. All trees and shrubs ³ taller than 1m and larger than ³ 3cm stem diameter found in 30 plots, 10x20m each, were identified and measured. Standing dead plants were also included. A total of 1952 plants were registered, belonging to 22 families, 38 genera and 54 species. Families with most species were Mimosaceae (6 species), Euphorbiaceae (6), Caesalpiniaceae (5), and Rubiaceae (5). Total plant density and stem basal area were 3253 plant ha-1 and 34.77m2 ha-1. Maximum diameter and height were 63cm and 15m. About half of the plants (45.7%) had a stem diameter between 3 and 6cm. Thiloa glaucocarpa (Mart.) Eichl. was the most important species (highest IVI value). The flora included mostly species already registered in other caatinga areas but also species which are typical from more mesic formations, specially the humid forests of high altitudes in Northeast Brazil.
    Acta Botanica Brasilica 09/2002; 16(3):357-369. · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    Acta Botanica Brasilica 12/2001; 15(3):413-426. · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Historically, forest landscapes have been modified by human activities, causing its destruction and fragmentation to exploit its resources. However, forests play a vital role in protecting the environment, especially on slops, hilltops, lakes, springs and river banks. This study aimed to understand the diversity and structure of vegetation on a slope of riparian forest in Bocaina de Minas, MG and identify key environmental variables that influence the spatial distribution of individual trees. An inventory of the tree community was conducted, in which ten of 10m×40m plots were allocated and systematically distributed throughout the study area. All individuals existing shrubs and trees within the plots with 1.30m diameter 5.0cm of soil were sampled in order to generate information on the horizontal structure, richness and diversity of the community. Variables related to the substrata were obtained for each plot from the topography and laboratory analysis of soil samples (pH, levels of P, K, Ca, Mg and Al, base saturation (V), organic matter and levels of sand, silt and clay). Other variables such as distance from the river and successional stage of the plots, were also evaluated. In order to correlate environmental variables with the abundance distribution of the species, a canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and Spearman correlation were used. The Shannon diversity index (H') and evenness index (J') obtained were 3.53 and 0.76, respectively. The emerging patterns of environmental variables and the abundance of species indicate that these were distributed throughout the fragment, mainly due to the P content in soil and successional stage of the plots. In addition, several species have produced significant correlations between their abundance in the plots and the variables related to successional stage, variations in soil, and distance from the banks of water courses. Key words: riparian forest, species-environment relationship and multivariate analysis.