Feng Yang

Xiamen University, Amoy, Fujian, China

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Publications (59)146.21 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Hemocytes are the major immune cells of crustaceans which are believed to be essential for the pathogenesis of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Crayfish hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells have been found to be susceptible to WSSV infection, but the procedure of WSSV infection to both cell types has not yet been carefully investigated. In this study, we analyzed the infection and proliferation of WSSV in crayfish hemocytes as well as HPT cells in detail through transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The results showed that WSSV could enter both hemocytes and HPT cells through endocytosis, but the production of progeny virus was only achieved in HPT cells. Further investigation demonstrated that although WSSV could transcribe its genes in both cell types, viral genome replication and structural protein expression were unsuccessful in hemocytes, which may be responsible for the failure of progeny production. Therefore, we propose that both hemocytes and HPT cells are susceptible to WSSV infection but only HPT cells are permissive to WSSV replication. These findings will extend our knowledge of the interaction between WSSV and the host immune system.
    Fish &amp Shellfish Immunology 03/2015; · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the major pathogens of cultured shrimp. Identification of envelope protein interactions has become a central issue for the understanding of WSSV assembly. In this paper, WSSV envelope protein VP52B was fused with GST-tag and expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3). Immunogold-electron microscopy revealed that VP52B was located on the outside surface of WSSV virions. Far-Western blotting analysis suggested that VP52B might directly interact with a major viral envelope protein VP26, and their interaction was confirmed by GST pull-down assay. Further investigation showed that the VP52B binding domain was located between residues 135-170 of VP26. These findings will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of WSSV morphogenesis.
    Virus Genes 10/2014; · 1.84 Impact Factor
  • Jianbo Li, Limei Xu, Fang Li, Feng Yang
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    ABSTRACT: VP12 and VP150 are two minor envelope proteins of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). In our previous studies, VP12 was found to co-migrate with 53-kDa form of VP150 on two-dimensional Blue Native/SDS-PAGE, suggesting that there is an interaction between them. In this study, we confirmed the interaction by co-immunoprecipitation assay and demonstrated that the binding region with VP12 is located between residues 207 and 803 of VP150. Further studies found that VP12 can be attached to WSSV capsids by interacting with capsid protein VP51, These findings suggest that VP12 may function as a linker protein participating in the linkage between VP12/VP150 complex and viral nucleocapsid.
    Virus Research 10/2013; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DNA viruses often target cellular proteins to modulate host cell cycles and facilitate viral genome replication. However, whether proliferation of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) requires regulation of the host cell cycle remains unclear. In the present study, we show that two WSSV paralogs, IE1 and WSV056, can interact with Litopenaeus vannamei retinoblastoma (Rb) like protein (lv-RBL) through the conserved LxCxE motif. Further investigation revealed that IE1 and WSV056 could also bind to Drosophila retinoblastoma family protein 1 (RBF1) in a manner similar to how they bind to lv-RBL. Using Drosophila RBF-E2F pathway as a model system, we demonstrated that both IE1 and WSV056 could sequester RBF1 from Drosophila E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) and subsequently activated E2F1 to stimulate G1/S transition. Our findings provide the first evidence that WSSV may regulate cell cycle progression by targeting the Rb-E2F pathway.
    Journal of Virology 09/2013; · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty one immediate-early (IE) genes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) have been identified so far. However, the transcriptional regulation of WSSV IE genes remains largely unknown. In this report, the 5' flanking regions of eighteen WSSV IE genes were cloned and eight functional promoter regions were identified. WSSV IE gene promoters normally contained a TATA box ~30 bp upstream of the transcriptional initiation site (TIS). Besides, the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element (CRE, TGACGTCA) was frequently found within the WSSV IE promoter regions. Mutations of the CREs of WSSV IE promoters P403 and P465 significantly reduced their activity, which suggests that these elements have a role in WSSV IE gene transcription. Our findings provide a more global view of WSSV IE gene promoters and will facilitate the in-depth investigation of viral gene transcriptional regulation.
    Journal of General Virology 11/2012; · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Viral immediate-early (IE) genes generally encode regulatory proteins that are critical for viral replication. Their transcription, which is independent of de novo viral protein synthesis, is driven directly by host transcription factors. In this study, we examined promoter activities of 12 predicted regulatory genes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) belonging to the zinc finger protein family by EGFP-reporter assays in High Five cells. The results showed that the promoters of three genes (wsv056, wsv403 and wsv465) could drive reporter gene expression, and RT-PCR analysis revealed that their expression in WSSV-infected primary crayfish hemocytes was insensitive to the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX). Therefore, they are IE genes of WSSV.
    Archives of Virology 05/2011; 156(9):1611-4. · 2.28 Impact Factor
  • Li Li, Zhaoyu Lin, Limei Xu, Feng Yang
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    ABSTRACT: Two WSSV envelope proteins, VP31 and VP33, contain a conserved Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence. In order to investigate the role of the RGD motif, wild-type and RGD-mutated VP31 and VP33 were recombinantly expressed in E. coli. The cell adhesion ability of the proteins was investigated in crayfish haemocytes using a fluorescence assay. The results showed that recombinant wild-type VP31 and VP33 had cell adhesion activity, and the RGD motif in VP31 was required for cell adhesion, which could be inhibited by an RGDT peptide. In contrast, the interaction of VP33 with cells did not require the RGD motif. These data indicate that the RGD motif plays an important role in the interaction between VP31 and host cells.
    Archives of Virology 03/2011; 156(8):1317-21. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a large enveloped virus, but the organization of its envelope proteins remains largely unknown. In the present study, we used blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) and SDS-PAGE in combination with mass spectrometry to analyze the envelope protein complexome of WSSV. Our results show that the viral envelope consists of multi-protein complexes (MPCs). Within them, the envelope protein VP19 exists as a homotrimer, while another major envelope protein, VP28, mainly exists as a homotetramer. The most notable feature is that the majority of MPCs include VP26 and VP24, suggesting that these two proteins might serve as hub proteins to recruit low-abundance proteins to MPCs and play crucial roles in the process of protein complex formation. Furthermore, we found significant evidence for interactions between several low-abundance proteins, such as VP52B/VP38/VP33 and VP12/VP150. The result of this study may promote the further research on WSSV envelope assembly.
    Archives of Virology 03/2011; 156(7):1125-35. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fe3O4 micro-spheres were synthesized by a simple chemical method at 90°C. It was demonstrated that the final size and morphology of Fe3O4 was significantly affected by the additive NaF. The as-synthesized products were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and vector network analysis. The complex permittivity and permeability of paraffin wax and Fe3O4 with different Fe3O4 volume fraction were measured to increase linearly with increasing volume fraction of Fe3O4. When the matching thickness is 4mm, the calculated reflection loss reaches a maximum value of −45.2dB at 4.67GHz with 40% volume fraction of Fe3O4.
    Materials Chemistry and Physics 11/2010; 124(1):353-358. · 2.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Size controlled and morphology tuned fabrication of Fe3O4 nanocrystals were achieved by a simple hydrothermal method using (NH4)2Fe(SO4)2·6H2O, hexamethylenetetramine, and sodium sulfate as original reaction materials. Fe3O4 particles with controlled size ranging from 160nm to 2μm were obtained by adding an appropriate amount of NH4Ac to the reaction system. Fe3O4 quadrangular nanoplates with side length of about 500nm were fabricated by adding optimum amount of urea. Box-like Fe3O4 nanocrystals were synthesized by adjusting the mol ratio between (NH4)2Fe(SO4)2·6H2O and hexamethylenetetramine. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Room-temperature magnetization curves that measured by vibrating sample magnetometer show morphology and size dependent magnetism.
    Journal of Alloys and Compounds 09/2010; 505(2):727-732. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Well crystallized α-MnO2 nanowires (NWs) with an average diameter of about 40 nm and an average length of about 30 μm were successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method. The complex permittivity and permeability of α-MnO2 NWs/paraffin composites with 20 vol.% α-MnO2 NWs were measured in a frequency region from 0.1 to 13 GHz. The value of maximum reflection loss of the composites with 20 vol.% α-MnO2 NWs is approximately − 35 dB at 3.13 GHz with a thickness of 3.6 mm, and the bandwidth corresponding to reflection loss below − 10 dB is higher than 1.8 GHz with a lower thickness of 1.2 mm.
    Materials Letters 07/2010; 64(13):1496-1498. · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ChemInform is a weekly Abstracting Service, delivering concise information at a glance that was extracted from about 100 leading journals. To access a ChemInform Abstract of an article which was published elsewhere, please select a “Full Text” option. The original article is trackable via the “References” option.
    ChemInform 04/2010; 41(14).
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    ABSTRACT: The controlled synthesis of Zn3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O hierarchical structures has been successfully realized in a large scale via a simple hydrothermal method. It was demonstrated that the morphologies of the final products are significantly affected by the quantity of hexamethylenetetramine, reaction temperature and reaction time. Optimum amount of sodium sulfate plays a crucial role in the development of crystallinity of the products. The morphology evolvement and the growth mechanism were discussed, and sulfate induced oriented attachment and temperature facilitated Ostwald ripening process were proposed for the possible formation mechanism. The structure and morphology of those products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrum, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) equipped with energy dispersion spectrum (EDS). Furthermore, the photoluminescence properties of those products were researched. Excellent visible light emission ranging from 400 to 700nm was exhibited via room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement.
    Materials Chemistry and Physics 04/2010; 120(2):426-430. · 2.13 Impact Factor
  • Yi Lin, Limei Xu, Feng Yang
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    ABSTRACT: VP33, also termed VP281, VP37 or VP36B, is a minor envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Because of its low abundance and lack of a transmembrane domain, we hypothesized that VP33 is likely to be attached to the viral envelope by interaction with other envelope proteins. In this study, we employed far-western blotting and pull-down assays to demonstrate that VP33 interacts with itself, as well as with VP24, which is one of the four major viral envelope proteins. Moreover, a gel-filtration analysis was performed to show that this self-interaction led to the formation of stable VP33 tetramers. These results implied that VP33 tetramers were anchored to the viral envelope through interaction with VP24, suggesting that VP33 may participate in the formation of the WSSV envelope.
    Archives of Virology 03/2010; 155(6):833-8. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Copper vanadium oxide hydroxide hydrate (Cu3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O) nanoparticles with mean size of about 100 nm were successfully synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectra, and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR). The composition and purity of the as-synthesized Cu3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O nanoparticles were characterized by Energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The magnetic property of the as-synthesized Cu3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O nanoparticles was characterized by vibrant sample magnetometer. Magnetic hysteresis curve indicate that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are of weak ferromagnetic property at room temperature.
    Materials Letters 02/2010; 64(4):516–519. · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Well-crystallized zinc vanadium oxide Zn3(VO4)2 micro-particles were successfully synthesized by annealing Zn3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O at 600°C for 10h in N2 atmosphere. X-ray diffraction pattern of the sample is in agreement with the standard pattern of orthorhombic Zn3(VO4)2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image reveals that the as-synthesized particles are about 2μm in mean diameter. The structure and composition of the as-synthesized sample were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), Raman spectrum, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore, the photoluminescence properties of the as-synthesized Zn3(VO4)2 were characterized via room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement, which exhibit excellent visible light emission ranging from 500 to 700nm.
    Journal of Alloys and Compounds 02/2010; 491(1):378-381. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Copper vanadium oxide hydroxide hydrate (Cu3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O) nanoparticles with mean size of about 100nm were successfully synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectra, and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR). The composition and purity of the as-synthesized Cu3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O nanoparticles were characterized by Energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The magnetic property of the as-synthesized Cu3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O nanoparticles was characterized by vibrant sample magnetometer. Magnetic hysteresis curve indicate that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are of weak ferromagnetic property at room temperature.
    Materials Letters - MATER LETT. 01/2010; 64(4):516-519.
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    ABSTRACT: Fe3O4–carbon sphere composite was synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized products were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and Raman spectrum. The complex permittivity and permeability of paraffin wax and Fe3O4–carbon sphere composite with different volume fraction of the composite were measured by vector network analysis. A wide region of microwave absorption was achieved due to dual dielectric and magnetic losses. When the matching thickness is 4mm, the calculated reflection loss of the sample with 70% volume fraction of Fe3O4–carbon sphere composite exhibits a broad microwave absorption ranging from 2.5 to 18GHz.
    Journal of Alloys and Compounds 01/2010; 489(1):252-256. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Strong green photoluminescence (PL) was observed for hydrothermal synthesized Zn3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O nanosheets. The energy band structure of the material was theoretically computed using first principle method and experimentally obtained by linear extrapolating from UV–vis reflection spectrum. It is shown that the material is an indirect bandgap semiconductor with a direct bandgap of 3.03eV at Γ and an indirect gap of 2.8eV from R to Γ. UV–vis reflection spectrum changes regularly along with doping of cobalt, showing clearly reflection peaks of Co2+. The bandgap of Zn3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O decreases significantly along with doping of cobalt, indicating the substitution of Co2+ with Zn2+. The intensity of the PL spectrum of Zn3(OH)2V2O7·nH2O that annealed in vacuum remains almost unchanged, whereas it distinctly decreases with doping of cobalt. The results indicate that it is zinc vacancies that cause the green emitting, which is in accordance with Zn deficiency that deduced from energy dispersion spectroscopy characterization.
    Materials Chemistry and Physics 01/2010; 124(1):803-808. · 2.13 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

636 Citations
146.21 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2013
    • Xiamen University
      • School of Life Sciences
      Amoy, Fujian, China
  • 2005–2011
    • Third Institute of Oceanography China
      Amoy, Fujian, China
  • 2009–2010
    • Lanzhou University
      • School of Physical Science and Technology
      Kao-lan-hsien, Gansu Sheng, China
    • Huazhong University of Science and Technology
      • School of Civil Engineering and Mechanics
      Wuhan, Hubei, China
  • 2008–2009
    • Wuhan University
      • State Key Laboratory of Virology
      Wuhan, Hubei, China
  • 2007–2009
    • Government of the People's Republic of China
      Peping, Beijing, China
    • Jimei University
      Amoy, Fujian, China