B. D. Patterson

Paul Scherrer Institut, Aargau, Switzerland

Are you B. D. Patterson?

Claim your profile

Publications (70)158.75 Total impact

  • Bruce D. Patterson
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) produces short pulses (10–50 fs) of intense (mJ μm−2 at 120 Hz) X-rays, with high transverse coherence. Such pulses open novel spectroscopic and scattering methods for static and time-resolved studies of matter, and many are based on X-ray crystallography. With serial femtosecond crystallography, the XFEL allows high-resolution structural determination on sub-micron protein crystals. Although the XFEL pulse is destructive, its short duration ensures that effectively undamaged material is probed. Coherent scattering features provide information on the physical crystal form and may assist in determining the crystallographic phase. By introducing synchronized optical laser pulses, one can perform ‘pump-probe’ measurements of dynamic properties, on the sub-picosecond timescale. These include photo-initiated structural modifications in biomolecules, photo-excited lattice vibrations and photo-driven structural phase transitions. As with synchrotron radiation, the XFEL wavelength can be tuned to atomic resonances, allowing time-resolved resonant-diffraction measurements, which are particularly sensitive to selected order parameters (lattice, charge, spin, and orbital) in magnetic or correlated electron materials. Finally, it is anticipated that the special properties of XFEL pulses will allow entirely new types of X-ray scattering measurements, such as ptychographic crystallography on 2D bio-crystals, correlation-function determination of nanoparticle geometry and nonlinear crystallographic mixing of optical and X-ray pulses.
    Crystallography Reviews 10/2014; 20(4). DOI:10.1080/0889311X.2014.939649 · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Physical, biological, and chemical transformations are initiated by changes in the electronic configuration of the species involved. These electronic changes occur on the timescales of attoseconds (1E−18 s) to femtoseconds (1E−15 s) and drive all subsequent electronic reorganization as the system moves to a new equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium state. The ability to detect the dynamics of these electronic changes is crucial for understanding the potential energy surfaces upon which chemical and biological reactions take place. Here, we report on the determination of the electronic structure of matter using a single self-seeded femtosecond x-ray pulse from the Linac Coherent Light Source hard x-ray free electron laser. By measuring the high energy resolution off-resonant spectrum (HEROS), we were able to obtain information about the electronic density of states with a single femtosecond x-ray pulse. We show that the unoccupied electronic states of the scattering atom may be determined on a shot-to-shot basis and that the measured spectral shape is independent of the large intensity fluctuations of the incoming x-ray beam. Moreover, we demonstrate the chemical sensitivity and single-shot capability and limitations of HEROS, which enables the technique to track the electronic structural dynamics in matter on femtosecond time scales, making it an ideal probe technique for time-resolved X-ray experiments.
    Structural Dynamics 03/2014; 1:021101. DOI:10.1063/1.4868260
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Next-generation X-ray sources, based on the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) concept, will provide highly coherent, ultrashort pulses of soft and hard X-rays with peak intensity many orders of magnitude higher than that of a synchrotron. These pulses will allow studies of femtosecond dynamics at nanometer resolution and with chemical selectivity. They will produce diffraction images of organic and inorganic nanostructures without deleterious effects of radiation damage.
    CHIMIA International Journal for Chemistry 02/2014; 68(1-2):73-8. DOI:10.2533/chimia.2014.73 · 1.35 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigate numerically the excitation of nonlinear magnetic interactions in a ferrite material by an energetic pump pulse of terahertz (THz) radiation. The calculations are performed by solving the coupled Maxwell and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert differential equations. In a time-resolved THz pump/THz probe scheme, it is demonstrated that Faraday rotation of a delayed THz probe pulse can be used to map these interactions. Our study is motivated by the ability of soft x-ray free electron lasers to perform time-resolved imaging of the magnetization process at the submicrometer and subpicosecond length and time scales.
    Physical Review B 10/2013; 88(14). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.88.140301 · 3.74 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The new X‐ray free‐electron laser source (SwissFEL) that is currently being developed at PSI will provide a broad‐bandpass mode with an energy bandwidth of about 4%. By using the full energy range, a new option for structural studies of crystalline materials may become possible. The proof of concept of broad‐bandpass diffraction presented here is based on Laue single‐crystal microdiffraction and the experimental setup on BL12.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. Diffraction patterns for 100 randomly oriented stationary crystallites of the MFI‐type zeolite ZSM‐5 were simulated assuming several bandwidths, and the statistical and structural results are discussed. With a 4% energy bandwidth, the number of reflection intensities measured in a single shot is significantly higher than with monochromatic radiation. Furthermore, the problem of partial reflection measurement, which is inherent to the monochromatic mode with stationary crystals, can be overcome.
    Journal of Applied Crystallography 06/2013; 46(3). DOI:10.1107/S0021889813005888 · 3.95 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Knowledge of the structure of biological macromolecules, especially in their native environment, is crucial because of the close structure-function relationship. X-ray small-angle scattering is used to determine the shape of particles in solution, but the achievable resolution is limited owing to averaging over particle orientations. In 1977, Kam proposed to obtain additional structural information from the cross-correlation of the scattering intensities. Here we develop the method in two dimensions, and give a procedure by which the single-particle diffraction pattern is extracted in a model-independent way from the correlations. We demonstrate its application to a large set of synchrotron X-ray scattering images on ensembles of identical, randomly oriented particles of 350 or 200 nm in size. The obtained 15 nm resolution in the reconstructed shape is independent of the number of scatterers. The results are discussed in view of proposed 'snapshot' scattering by molecules in the liquid phase at X-ray free-electron lasers.
    Nature Communications 04/2013; 4:1647. DOI:10.1038/ncomms2622 · 10.74 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In preparation for picosecond pump-probe experiments at the SwissFEL X-ray laser facility, the feasibility of collectively initiating surface chemical reactions using energetic pulses of terahertz radiation is being tested.
    CHIMIA International Journal for Chemistry 05/2011; 65(5):323-5. DOI:10.2533/chimia.2011.323 · 1.35 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present an investigation of the near-surface tetragonal phase transition in SrTiO3, using the complementary techniques of beta-detected nuclear magnetic resonance and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. The results show a clear depth dependence of the phase transition on scales of a few microns. The measurements support a model in which there are tetragonal domains forming in the sample at temperatures much higher than the bulk phase transition temperature. Moreover, we find that these domains tend to form at higher temperatures preferentially near the free surface of the crystal. The details of the tetragonal domain formation and their depth/lateral dependencies are discussed.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 05/2011; 83(22). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.83.224112 · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The issue of beam-induced damage on diffractive hard X-ray optics is addressed. For this purpose a systematic study on the radiation damage induced by a high-power X-ray beam is carried out in both ambient and inert atmospheres. Diffraction gratings fabricated by three different techniques are considered: electroplated Au gratings both with and without the polymer mold, and Ir-coated Si gratings. The beam-induced damage is monitored by X-ray diffraction and evaluated using scanning electron microscopy.
    Journal of Synchrotron Radiation 11/2010; 17(6):786-90. DOI:10.1107/S0909049510028487 · 3.02 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Next-generation X-ray sources, based on the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) concept, will provide highly coherent, ultrashort pulses of soft and hard X-rays with peak intensity many orders of magnitude above that of a synchrotron. These pulses will allow studies of femtosecond dynamics at nanometer resolution and with chemical selectivity. They will produce coherent-diffraction images of organic and inorganic nanostructures without the deleterious effects of radiation damage.
    Europhysics news 09/2010; DOI:10.1051/epn/2010503
  • R. Abela · B. D. Patterson
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Paul Scherrer Institute is planning the construction of an X-ray free electron laser (SwissFEL), which will produce 20-fs pulses of coherent X-rays in the wavelength range 0.1–7nm, with peak brightness approximately 1010 times that of a third-generation synchrotron beamline. The brightness, the coherence and the short pulses will provide opportunities for performing novel science in the fields of chemistry, biochemistry, solid-state physics and materials science. It is planned that the SwissFEL will be operational by the end of 2016. The present article focuses on promising SwissFEL applications in the field of time-resolved X-ray scattering from chemical systems.
    TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry 06/2010; 29(6):538-543. DOI:10.1016/j.trac.2010.02.012 · 6.61 Impact Factor
  • B D Patterson · R Abela
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Time-dependent X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of chemical reaction dynamics have a time resolution which is limited by: (a) the speed and efficiency of the reaction initiation; (b) the duration of the X-ray pulses used for the measurement; and (c) the brightness of the X-ray source. X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL), which will deliver 20-100 fs pulses of X-rays, with a peak brightness which is 10(10) times that of a synchrotron, will alleviate limitations (b) and (c). Furthermore, by including a synchronized source of UV, visible, IR or THz pump radiation, the XFEL will contribute to the solution of limitation (a). The present article describes the XFEL operating principle and the generic design of an XFEL facility, emphasizing the features of particular interest to the XAS investigator.
    Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 06/2010; 12(21):5647-52. DOI:10.1039/c003406a · 4.20 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Paul Scherrer Institute is planning the construction of a hard-x-ray free-electron laser, the SwissFEL, by 2016, which will produce intense, ultrashort pulses of transversely coherent radiation in the wavelength range 0.1–7 nm, with future extensions to cover the range 0.08–30 nm. Special design considerations include (a) a compact construction, compatible with the status of a national facility, (b) a uniform 100 Hz repetition rate, well suited to sample manipulations and detector readout, (c) flexible wavelength tuning by the electron beam energy and undulator gaps, (d) soft x-rays at approximately 1 nm wavelength, with circular polarization and Fourier-transform-limited pulses, (e) hard x-rays of pulse duration 5–20 fs and (f) an independent source of high-energy, half-cycle terahertz pump pulses. The science case for the Swiss FEL project, which emphasizes the dynamics of condensed matter systems and the damage-free imaging of nanostructures, includes novel considerations that make optimal use of these features.
    New Journal of Physics 03/2010; 12(3):035012. DOI:10.1088/1367-2630/12/3/035012 · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The structure of epitaxially grown hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on the surface of a Ru(0001) single crystal was investigated using surface X-ray diffraction, which showed the system to form a commensurate 14-on-13 superstructure. This result disagrees with previous reports on superstructures of the same system and arguments based on simple thermal expansion coefficient calculations. We argue that the larger observed superstructure forms because of the strong bonding of h-BN to Ru. In comparison to h-BN/Rh(111) it can accommodate more induced lateral in-plane strain- or lock-in energy over larger regions (referred to as the holes) within the superstructure, which itself can consequently become larger.
    Surface Science 03/2010; 604(5). DOI:10.1016/j.susc.2010.01.003 · 1.87 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present a high-resolution surface X-ray diffraction study of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on the surface of Rh(111). The previously observed commensurate 13-on-12 superstructure for this system is stable in the temperature range between room temperature and 830°C. Surface X-ray diffraction measurements up to 830°C on the superstructure show no sign of a shift towards a different superstructure, demonstrating the high thermal stability and strong bonding between film and substrate. At lower temperatures, an anomalous thermal expansion behaviour of the topmost surface region of rhodium is observed, where the rhodium in-plane lattice constant remains invariant. This can be explained by the (h-BN) single-layer being compressively strained, whereby the strong bonding to the substrate causes the latter to be tensile strained.
    Surface Science 03/2010; 604(5). DOI:10.1016/j.susc.2009.12.016 · 1.87 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present a structural analysis of the graphene/Ru(0001) system obtained by surface x-ray diffraction. The data were fit using Fourier-series expanded displacement fields from an ideal bulk structure, plus the application of symmetry constraints. The shape of the observed superstructure rods proves a reconstruction of the substrate, induced by strong bonding of graphene to ruthenium. Both the graphene layer and the underlying substrate are corrugated, with peak-to-peak heights of (0.82 +/- 0.15) A and (0.19 +/- 0.02) A for the graphene and topmost Ru-atomic layer, respectively. The Ru-corrugation decays slowly over several monolayers into the bulk. The system also exhibits chirality, whereby in-plane rotations of up to 2.0 degrees in those regions of the superstructure where the graphene is weakly bound are driven by elastic energy minimization.
    New Journal of Physics 08/2009; 12. DOI:10.1088/1367-2630/12/4/043028 · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The structural changes of rapidly-quenched amorphous Mg?Cu?Y alloys during time-dependent room-temperature embrittlement were investigated. A continuous reduction in enthalpic content with time, corresponding to a loss in free volume, and radial atomic distances obtained from synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments imply an overall reduction in volume. Two distinct lifetimes were found by positron annihilation lifetime spectra, with the longer-lifetime component (attributed to areas of larger free volume) vanishing after an ageing time corresponding roughly to the time of embrittlement. Coincidence Doppler broadening suggests that the immediate environment of the annihilation sites is not altered during ageing. The mechanical behaviour correlates with the structural changes in the alloy. The densification observed is assumed to influence the sharp ductile-to-brittle transition in these Mg-based glasses, and the abrupt change in bending ductility is found to result from disappearing large free volume.
    Philosophical Magazine A 01/2009; 89(3-3):233-248. DOI:10.1080/14786430802603720
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An X-ray diffraction method has been developed to derive concentration profiles of fluids under one-dimensional confinement. A microfluiclic array of channels is used as a container for the fluid under investigation. Thereby the ensemble average of many channels is studied rather than individual realizations of the system. Additionally, the X-ray scattering signal is enhanced and the radiation dose per fluid volume reduced. As an example, data are shown for a colloidal solution of silica particles of about 109 nm diameter under confinement in channels ranging from 280 to 615 nm width. The density profiles across the channels have been determined in a model independent way with a resolution in the 10 nm regime. When the electrostatic potential of the colloidal particles is shielded, we observe an oscillatory ordering-disordering behaviour of the colloidal particles as a function of the channel width, while the colloidal solution remains in the liquid state. This phenomenon has been suggested by surface force studies of hard-sphere fluids and also theoretically predicted, but has so far never been seen by direct measurements of the structure for comparable systems. The size of the fluid's constituents and of the confining cavities can be scaled down to below 100 nm, opening up the possibility for the investigation of confinement effects in e.g. protein crystallization.
    CHIMIA International Journal for Chemistry 10/2008; 62(10). DOI:10.2533/chimia.2008.789 · 1.35 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigated with synchrotron x-ray diffraction and reflectometry the formation of structural domains in the near-surface region of single crystalline SrTiO3 (001) substrates with Y0.6Pr0.4Ba2Cu3O7/La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 superlattices grown on top. We find that the antiferrodistortive cubic to tetragonal transition, which occurs at TSTO=104K in the bulk and at a considerably higher temperature of at least 120 K in the surface region of SrTiO3 , has only a weak influence on the domain formation. The strongest changes occur instead in the vicinity of the tetragonal to orthorhombic transition in SrTiO3 around 65 K where pronounced surface facets develop that reach deep (at least several micrometers) into the SrTiO3 substrate. These micrometer-sized facets are anisotropic and tilted with respect to one another by up to 0.5° along the shorter direction. Finally, we find that a third structural transition below 30 K gives rise to significant changes in the spread of the c -axis parameters. Overall, our data provide evidence for a strong mutual interaction between the structural properties of the SrTiO3 surface and the multilayer grown on top.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 10/2008; 78(13). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.78.134111 · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The structure of a single layer of graphene on Ru(0001) has been studied using surface x-ray diffraction. A surprising superstructure containing 1250 carbon atoms has been determined, whereby 25 x 25 graphene unit cells lie on 23 x 23 unit cells of Ru. Each supercell contains 2 x 2 crystallographically inequivalent subcells caused by corrugation. Strong intensity oscillations in the superstructure rods demonstrate that the Ru substrate is also significantly corrugated down to several monolayers and that the bonding between graphene and Ru is strong and cannot be caused by van der Waals bonds. Charge transfer from the Ru substrate to the graphene expands and weakens the C-C bonds, which helps accommodate the in-plane tensile stress. The elucidation of this superstructure provides important information in the potential application of graphene as a template for nanocluster arrays.
    Physical Review Letters 10/2008; 101(12):126102. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.126102 · 7.51 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
158.75 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997–2014
    • Paul Scherrer Institut
      • • Laboratory of Micro and Nanotechnology (LMN)
      • • Swiss Light Source (SLS)
      • • Research Department Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology (SYN)
      Aargau, Switzerland
  • 2009
    • University of Zurich
      • Institute for Geophysics
      Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland