Jeremy Shaffer

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

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Publications (7)0 Total impact

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    Jeremy Shaffer, Daniel P. Siewiorek
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    ABSTRACT: Locator@CMU is a centralized wireless location service that provides information on all connected 802.11 devices on Carnegie Mellon's Wireless Andrew network. The basic architecture and functionality of this service are presented. In addition the implementation of a location-based application is discussed. The results are presented in the context of a new location-based service that allows for the determination of the number of clients at an access point at a specified future time. The access points are classified into four categories and results presented based on each type. Our results show that using the Locator@CMU system can predict future access point utilization to 30% accuracy. This work presents the potential foundation for the creation of a system that can be used to .provide this information for interested social or dynamic network configuration programs.
    Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on Wireless Networks, ICWN 2006, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, June 26-29, 2006; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: Not Available
    Wearable Computers, 2003. Proceedings. Seventh IEEE International Symposium on; 11/2005
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a system developed for determining locations of devices on 802.11 wireless networks. Data representing 18,000 computers registered on Carnegie Mellon's Wireless Andrew is presented from traces taken in 2003 and 2005. Developers make many assumptions when creating applications for wearable and pervasive computers. The data collected by Locator@CMU provides a clearer understanding of large-scale wireless networks and their usage for implementing services and programs. Among the findings, we examine the mobility of a user as defined by percentage of time spent at their home site and favorite sites. Our results show that only a small number of wireless users exhibit high mobility and our data suggests that typical mobile users utilize the network only in a handful of sites. These basic patterns have remained steady over the past two years.
    Wearable Computers, 2005. Proceedings. Ninth IEEE International Symposium on; 11/2005
  • Jeremy Shaffer, Daniel P. Siewiorek
    Proceedings of the 2005 International Conference on Wireless Networks, ICWN 2005, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, June 27-30, 2005; 01/2005
  • Jeremy Shaffer, Daniel P. Siewiorek
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Wireless Networks, ICWN '04, Volume 2 & Proceedings of the International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications, PCC'04, June 21-24, 2004, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; 01/2004
  • Ophir Tanz, Jeremy Shaffer
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to determine the location of a mobile device is a challenge that has persistently evaded technologists. Although solutions to this problem have been extensively developed, none provide the accuracy, range, or cost-effectiveness to serve as a solution over a large urban area. The Global Positioning System (GPS) does not work well indoors or in urban environments. Infrared based systems require line-of-site, are costly to install and do not perform well in direct sunlight [1]. Cellular network-based positioning systems are limited by cell size and also do not work well indoors [23]. The list goes on. With the rise of Wireless Internet, or WiFi as it is commonly dubbed, the best infrastructure for location awareness to date has been created. WiFi is standardized, inexpensive to deploy, easy to install and a default component in a wide-range of consumer devices. These characteristics are the drivers behind WiFi’s most significant trait: increasing ubiquity. By developing within the existing 802.11 infrastructure, developers can leverage WiFi to create wide-spread context-aware services.
    Ambient Intelligence for Scientific Discovery - Foundations, Theories, andSystems [outcome of the SIGCHI Workshop, Vienna, April 25, 2004]; 01/2004
  • Jeremy Shaffer, Daniel P. Siewiorek
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Wireless Networks, ICWN '03, June 23 - 26, 2003, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; 01/2003