Javier Orrit

University of Barcelona, Barcino, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (2)4.6 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A simplified alternative to the Cox maze procedure to treat atrial fibrillation with epicardial high-intensity focused ultrasound was evaluated clinically, and the initial clinical results were assessed at the 6-month follow-up visit. From September 2002 through February 2004, 103 patients were prospectively enrolled in a multicenter study. Atrial fibrillation duration ranged from 6 to 240 months (mean, 44 months) and was permanent in 76 (74%) patients, paroxysmal in 22 (21%) patients, and persistent in 5 (5%) patients. All patients had concomitant operations, and ablation was performed epicardially on the beating heart before the concomitant procedure. The device automatically created a circumferential left atrial ablation around the pulmonary veins in an average of 10 minutes, and an additional mitral line was created epicardially in 35 (34%) patients with a handheld device by using the same technology. No complications or deaths were device or procedure related. There were 4 (3.8%) early deaths and 2 late extracardiac deaths. The 6-month follow-up was complete in all survivors. At the 6-month visit, freedom from atrial fibrillation was 85% in the entire study group (80% in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, 88% in the 35 patients who had the additional mitral line, and 100% in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation). A pacemaker was implanted in 8 patients. Only the duration and type of atrial fibrillation significantly increased the risk of recurrence. Epicardial, off-pump, beating-heart ablation with acoustic energy is safe and cures 80% of patients with permanent atrial fibrillation associated with long-standing structural heart disease.
    Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 10/2005; 130(3):803-9. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Whilst the pulmonary valve is a tricuspid valve, very few reports exist of bicuspid pulmonary valves, the majority of which are associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated bicuspid valves not associated with congenital abnormalities are even more rare. Herein, the case is described of a 65-year-old man who died from a stroke, and in whom a bicuspid pulmonary valve was found during post-mortem dissection for tissue donation.
    The Journal of heart valve disease 06/2004; 13(3):521-2. · 1.07 Impact Factor