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Publications (4)2.07 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Network intrusion detection systems (NIDSs) monitor network traffic for suspicious activity and alert the system or network administrator. With the onset of gigabit networks, current generation networking components for NIDS will soon be insufficient for numerous reasons; most notably because the existing methods cannot support high-performance demands. Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are an attractive medium to handle both high throughput and adaptability to the dynamic nature of intrusion detection. In this work, we design an FPGA-based architecture for anomaly detection in network transmissions. We first develop a feature extraction module (FEM) which aims to summarize network information to be used at a later stage. Our FPGA implementation shows that we can achieve significant performance improvements compared to existing software and application-specific integrated-circuit implementations. Then, we go one step further and demonstrate the use of principal component analysis as an outlier detection method for NIDSs. The results show that our architecture correctly classifies attacks with detection rates exceeding 99% and false alarms rates as low as 1.95%. Moreover, using extensive pipelining and hardware parallelism, it can be shown that for realistic workloads, our architectures for FEM and outlier analysis achieve 21.25- and 23.76-Gb/s core throughput, respectively.
    IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security 04/2008; · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With the onset of Gigabit networks, current generation networking components will soon be insufficient for numerous reasons: most notably because existing methods cannot support high performance demands. Feature extraction (or flow monitoring), an essential component in anomaly detection, summarizes network behavior from a packet stream. This information is fed into intrusion detection methods such as association rule mining, outlier analysis, and classification algorithms in order to characterize network behavior. However, current feature extraction methods based on per-flow analysis are expensive, not scalable, and thus prohibitive for large-scale networks. In this paper, we propose an accurate and scalable feature extraction module (FEM) based on sketches. We present the details of the FEM design on an FPGA and show that using FPGAs we can achieve significantly better performance compared to existing software and ASIC implementations. Specifically, the optimal FEM configuration achieves 21.25 Gbps throughput and 97.61% accuracy.
    Proceedings of the 2005 International Conference on Field Programmable Logic and Applications (FPL), Tampere, Finland, August 24-26, 2005; 01/2005
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    David Nguyen, Joseph Zambreno, Gokhan Memik
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    ABSTRACT: Flow monitoring is a required task for a variety of networking appli- cations including fair scheduling and intrusion/anomaly detection. Existing flow monitoring techniques are implemented in software, which are insufficient for real-time monitoring in high-speed networks. In this paper, we present the design of a flow monitoring scheme based on two-dimensional hash tables. Taking advantage of FPGA technology, we exploit the use of parallelism in our implementation for both accuracy and performance. We present four tech- niques based on this two-dimensional hash table scheme. Using a simulation environment that processes packet traces, our implementation can find flow in- formation within 8% of the actual value while achieving link speeds exceeding 60 Gbps for a workload with constant packet sizes of 40 bytes.
    Field Programmable Logic and Application, 14th International Conference , FPL 2004, Leuven, Belgium, August 30-September 1, 2004, Proceedings; 01/2004
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    ABSTRACT: Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) have lately be- come a popular target for implementing cryptographic block ciphers, as a well-designed FPGA solution can combine some of the algorithmic flex- ibility and cost efficiency of an equivalent software implementation with throughputs that are comparable to custom ASIC designs. The recently selected Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is slowly replacing older ciphers as the building block of choice for secure systems and is well suited to an FPGA implementation. In this paper we explore the design decisions that lead to area/delay tradeoffs in a single-core AES FPGA implementation. This work provides a more thorough description of the defining AES hardware characteristics than is currently available in the research literature, along with implementation results that are pareto optimal in terms of throughput, latency, and area efficiency.
    Field Programmable Logic and Application, 14th International Conference , FPL 2004, Leuven, Belgium, August 30-September 1, 2004, Proceedings; 01/2004