Gloria Ruiz

Pontifical Xavierian University (Bogota), Μπογκοτά, Bogota D.C., Colombia

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Publications (6)16.79 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:It has been suggested that probiotics may decrease infant mortality and nosocomial infections because of their ability to suppress colonization and translocation of bacterial pathogens in the gastrointestinal tract. We designed a large double-blinded placebo-controlled trial using Lactobacillus reuteri to test this hypothesis in preterm infants.METHODS:Eligible infants were randomly assigned during the first 48 hours of life to either daily probiotic administration or placebo. Infants in the intervention group were administered enterally 5 drops of a probiotic preparation containing 10(8) colony-forming units of L reuteri DSM 17938 until death or discharge from the NICU.RESULTS:A total of 750 infants ≤2000 g were enrolled. The frequency of the primary outcome, death, or nosocomial infection, was similar in the probiotic and placebo groups (relative risk 0.87; 95% confidence interval: 0.63-1.19; P = .376). There was a trend toward a lower rate of nosocomial pneumonia in the probiotic group (2.4% vs 5.0%; P = .06) and a nonsignificant 40% decrease in necrotizing enterocolitis (2.4% vs 4.0%; P = .23). Episodes of feeding intolerance and duration of hospitalization were lower in infants ≤ 1500 g (9.6% vs 16.8% [P = .04]; 32.5 days vs 37 days [P = .03]).CONCLUSIONS:Although L reuteri did not appear to decrease the rate of the composite outcome, the trends suggest a protective role consistent with what has been observed in the literature. Feeding intolerance and duration of hospitalization were decreased in premature infants ≤1500 g.
    PEDIATRICS 10/2012; 130(5). DOI:10.1542/peds.2011-3584 · 5.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Candida infections represent a major threat in neonatal intensive care units. This is the first prospective study to obtain caspofungin plasma levels and safety data for neonates and very young infants. Patients of <3 months of age receiving intravenous amphotericin B for documented or highly suspected candidiasis were enrolled in a single-dose (n = 6) or subsequent multiple-dose (n = 12) panel; all received caspofungin at 25 mg/m2 once daily as a 1-hour infusion. Caspofungin plasma levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and compared to historical data from adults. Patient chronological ages ranged from 1 to 11 weeks, and weights ranged from 0.68 to 3.8 kg. Gestational ages ranged from 24 to 41 weeks. Geometric mean (GM) peak (C1 h) and trough (C24 h) caspofungin levels were 8.2 and 1.8 μg/ml, respectively, on day 1, and 11.1 and 2.4 μg/ml, respectively, on day 4. GM ratios for C1 h and C24 h for neonates/infants relative to adults receiving caspofungin at 50 mg/day were 1.07 and 1.36, respectively, on day 1, and 1.18 and 1.21, respectively, on day 4. Clinical and laboratory adverse events occurred in 17 (94%) and 8 (44%) patients, respectively. Five patients (28%) had serious adverse events, none of which were considered drug related. Caspofungin at 25 mg/m2 once daily was well tolerated in this group of neonates/infants of <3 months of age and appears to provide relatively similar plasma exposure to that obtained in adults receiving 50 mg/day. However, the small number of patients studied precludes any definitive recommendations about caspofungin dosing for this group comprising a broad range of ages and weights.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 12/2008; 53(3):869-75. DOI:10.1128/AAC.00868-08 · 4.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the efficacy and safety of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) compared to conventional ventilation (CV) for the treatment of respiratory failure in term and near-term infants in Colombia. Eligible infants with moderate to severe respiratory failure were randomized to early treatment with CV or HFOV. Ventilator management and general patient care were standardized. The main outcome was neonatal death or pulmonary air leak. A total of 119 infants were enrolled (55 in the HFOV group; 64 in the CV group) during the study period. Six infants in the HFOV group (11%) and two infants in the CV group (3%) developed the primary outcome (RR: 3.6, 95% CI: 0.8-16.9). Five infants in the HFOV group (9%) and one infant in the CV (2%) died before 28 days of life (RR: 5.9 CI: 0.7-48.2). Secondary outcomes were similar between groups. HFOV may not be superior to CV as an early treatment for respiratory failure in this age group. Standardization of ventilator management and general patient care may have a greater impact on the outcome in Colombia than mode of ventilation.
    Journal of Perinatology 12/2005; 25(11):720-4. DOI:10.1038/sj.jp.7211386 · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The epidemiology of nosocomial infections (NI) in neonatal intensive care units in developing countries has been poorly studied. We conducted a prospective study in selected neonatal units in Colombia, SA, to describe the incidence rate, causative organisms, and interinstitutional differences. Data were collected prospectively from February 20 to August 30, 2001 from eight neonatal units. NI was defined as culture-proven infection diagnosed after 72 h of hospitalization, resulting in treatment with antibiotics for >3 days. Linear regression models were used to describe associations between institutional variables and NI rates. A total of 1504 infants were hospitalized for more than 72 h, and therefore, at risk for NI. Of all, 127 infections were reported among 80 patients (5.3%). The incidence density rate was 6.2 per 1000 patient-days. Bloodstream infections accounted for 78% of NIs. Gram-negative organisms predominated over gram-positive organisms (55 vs 38%) and were prevalent in infants < or =2000 g (54%). The most common pathogens were Staphylococcus epidermidis (26%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (12%). Gram-negative organisms predominate in Colombia among infants <2000 g. The emergence of gram-negative organisms and their associated risk factors requires further study.
    Journal of Perinatology 09/2005; 25(8):531-6. DOI:10.1038/sj.jp.7211345 · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to identify risk factors for nosocomial infections among infants admitted into eight neonatal intensive care units in Colombia. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors could be used to guide the design of interventions to prevent the problem. Data were collected prospectively from eight neonatal units. Nosocomial infection was defined as culture-proven infection diagnosed after 72 hours of hospitalization, resulting in treatment with antibiotics for >3 days. Associations were expressed as odds ratios. Logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. From a total of 1504 eligible infants, 80 were treated for 127 episodes of nosocomial infection. Logistic regression analysis identified the combined exposure to postnatal steroids and H2-blockers, and use of oral gastric tubes for enteral nutrition as risk factors significantly associated with nosocomial infection. Nosocomial infections in Colombian neonatal intensive care units were associated with modifiable risk factors including use of postnatal steroids and H2-blockers.
    Journal of Perinatology 09/2005; 25(8):537-41. DOI:10.1038/sj.jp.7211353 · 2.35 Impact Factor
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Publication Stats

129 Citations
16.79 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2012
    • Pontifical Xavierian University (Bogota)
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Μπογκοτά, Bogota D.C., Colombia
    • Pontificia Universidad Javeriana
      Μπογκοτά, Bogota D.C., Colombia
  • 2008
    • Hospital Universitario San Ignacio
      Μπογκοτά, Bogota D.C., Colombia