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Publications (6)11.19 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Secondary abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a lethal complication after resuscitation from burn shock, even after abdominal decompression (AD) is performed. This study investigated increased susceptibility to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in extensively burned patients with ACS. Patients admitted to our burn unit between 2002 and 2005 with burns affecting 40% or more of the total body surface area without severe inhalation injury were analyzed. Hemodynamic parameters, blood gas analysis, and intrabladder pressure as intra-abdominal pressure were recorded. Serum interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6 concentrations were measured in 20 of these patients. Lung injury score and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores were serially determined. Fourteen of 38 patients developed intra-abdominal hypertension in 22.9 +/- 8.9 hours postburn. Hemodynamic parameters in these 14 patients, including peak intra-abdominal pressure (46.6 +/- 11.2 to 19.8 +/- 9.9 cm H2O), peak inspiratory pressure (51.4 +/- 10.5 to 31.8 +/- 7.0 cm H2O), and abdominal perfusion pressure (51.3 +/- 18.3 to 73.9 +/- 13.6 mm Hg), were improved immediately after AD. Despite AD, lung injury score and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores increased significantly 2 and 3 days postburn in patients who required AD. Plasma concentration of IL-8 was elevated in intra-abdominal hypertension patients 3 days postburn. Intra-abdominal hypertension induced acute lung injury and MODS with IL-8 elevation, even though AD improved hemodynamic parameters in extensively burned patients.
    The Journal of trauma 07/2007; 62(6):1365-9. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • Nihon Kyukyu Igakukai Zasshi 01/2007; 18(12):820-825.
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    ABSTRACT: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is rarely reported as a complication of severe burn. This study clarified the risk of burned patients with and without ACS, especially regarding the resuscitation fluid volume. Extensively burned patients admitted to our burn unit from January 2003, through to June 2004, were examined. Vital signs, blood gas analysis, bladder pressure to estimate intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), resuscitation fluid volume, and urine output (UO) were analyzed. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) was defined as an IAP of more than 30 cm of H2O. Eight of 48 patients suffering from a more than 30% total burn surface area developed ACS in 18.3+/-4.9 h. In these patients, IAP (49+/-12 cmH2O), PIP (50+/-16 cmH2O), heart rate (115+/-8/min), and PaCO2 (54.6+/-10.1 mmHg) were higher than normal, and their resuscitation volume was 0.40+/-0.11 L/kg. Also, a significant correlation between the IBP, PIP and resuscitation volume was observed. Most patients with severe burns required more than 300 mL/kg of resuscitation fluid for the first 24 h after injury that led to ACS and had higher HR, IBP, PIP and PaCO2 despite arterial pressure showing no significant difference.
    Burns 04/2006; 32(2):151-4. · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Secondary abdominal compartment syndrome is a lethal complication after resuscitation from burn shock. Hypertonic lactated saline (HLS) infusion reduces early fluid requirements in burn shock, but the effects of HLS on intraabdominal pressure have not been clarified. Patients admitted to our burn unit between 2002 and 2004 with burns > or =40% of the total body surface area without severe inhalation injury were entered into a fluid resuscitation protocol using HLS (n = 14) or lactated Ringer's solution (n = 22). Urine output was monitored hourly with a goal of 0.5 to 1.0 mL/kg per hour. Hemodynamic parameters, blood gas analysis, intrabladder pressure as an indicator of intraabdominal pressure (IAP), and the peak inspiratory pressure were recorded. Pulmonary compliance and the abdominal perfusion pressure were also calculated. In the HLS group, the amount of intravenous fluid volume needed to maintain adequate urine output was less at 3.1 +/- 0.9 versus 5.2 +/- 1.2 mL/24 h per kg per percentage of total body surface area, and the peak IAP and peak inspiratory pressure at 24 hours after injury were significantly lower than those in the lactated Ringer's group. Two of 14 patients (14%) in the HLS group and 11 of 22 patients (50%) developed IAH within 20.8 +/- 7.2 hours after injury. In patients with severe burn injury, a large intravenous fluid volume decreases abdominal perfusion during the resuscitative period because of increased IAP. Our data suggest that HLS resuscitation could reduce the risk of secondary abdominal compartment syndrome with lower fluid load in burn shock patients.
    The Journal of trauma 01/2006; 60(1):64-71. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) can become fatal; however, it has rarely been described as a complication of burn injury. This study clarified the physiologic results of abdominal decompression (AD) for ACS in patients with burn injury in detail. Extensively burned patients admitted to our burn unit between January 2003 and February 2004 were prospectively monitored by pulmonary artery catheter. Physiologic parameters from the catheter, blood gas analysis, intrabladder pressure as a parameter of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), peak inspiratory pressure, and urine output (UO) were compared before and after escharotomy as AD in patients with ACS. Eight of 36 patients who had sustained more than 30% total body surface area burn developed ACS requiring AD in 18.3 +/- 4.9 hours. AD significantly decreased IAP (52 +/- 9 cm H2O vs. 26 +/- 7 cm H2O), peak inspiratory pressure (53 +/- 13 cm H2O vs. 35 +/- 6 cm H2O), heart rate, and Paco2, and increased cardiac index (1.6 +/- 0.7 L/min/m2 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.9 L/min/m2), abdominal perfusion pressure (50 +/- 11 mm Hg vs. 72 +/- 17 mm Hg), UO (0.45 +/- 0.46 mL/h/kg vs. 2.0 +/- 2.1 mL/h/kg), and oxygen delivery index (290 +/- 195 mL/m2/min vs. 455 +/- 218 mL/m2/min). Impaired oxygen consumption index increased (86 +/- 43 mL/m2/min vs. 153 +/- 58 mL/m2/min) after AD. In patients with severe burn injury, elevated IAP makes pulmonary artery wedge pressure and UO unreliable indices of preload or intravascular volume, and decreases abdominal perfusion in the resuscitation period. AD in these patients significantly improves the ventilation, hemodynamic parameters, and oxygen metabolism.
    The Journal of trauma 09/2005; 59(2):369-74. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) can become fatal; however, it has rarely been described as a complication of burn injury. This study clarified the physiologic results of abdominal decompression (AD) for ACS in patients with burn injury in detail. Methods: Extensively burned patients admitted to our burn unit between January 2003 and February 2004 were prospectively monitored by pulmonary artery catheter. Physiologic parameters from the catheter, blood gas analysis, intrabladder pressure as a parameter of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), peak inspiratory pressure, and urine output (UO) were compared before and after escharotomy as AD in patients with ACS. Results: Eight of 36 patients who had sustained more than 30% total body surface area burn developed ACS requiring AD in 18.3 ± 4.9 hours. AD significantly decreased IAP (52 ± 9 cm H2O vs. 26 ± 7 cm H2O), peak inspiratory pressure (53 ± 13 cm H2O vs. 35 ± 6 cm H2O), heart rate, and Paco2, and increased cardiac index (1.6 ± 0.7 L/min/m2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.9 L/min/m2), abdominal perfusion pressure (50 ± 11 mm Hg vs. 72 ± 17 mm Hg), UO (0.45 ± 0.46 mL/h/kg vs. 2.0 ± 2.1 mL/h/kg), and oxygen delivery index (290 ± 195 mL/m2/min vs. 455 ± 218 mL/m2/min). Impaired oxygen consumption index increased (86 ± 43 mL/m2/min vs. 153 ± 58 mL/m2/min) after AD. Conclusion: In patients with severe burn injury, elevated IAP makes pulmonary artery wedge pressure and UO unreliable indices of preload or intravascular volume, and decreases abdominal perfusion in the resuscitation period. AD in these patients significantly improves the ventilation, hemodynamic parameters, and oxygen metabolism.
    The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 07/2005; 59(2):368-373. · 2.35 Impact Factor