Yehia Massoud

Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (210)87.24 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A spike detector has become a necessity of a contemporary multichannel neural recording microsystem for data-compression. This paper proposes two spike detection algorithms, frequency-enhanced nonlinear energy operator (fNEO) and energy-of-derivative (ED), to solve the sensitivity degradation suffered by the conventional nonlinear energy operator (NEO) at the presence of large-amplitude baseline interferences. The efficiency of NEO, fNEO and ED algorithms are evaluated with Simulink programs firstly and then implemented into three low-power spike detectors with a standard 0.13-mu m CMOS process. To achieve a low-power design, subthreshold CMOS analog multipliers, derivatives and adders are developed to work with a low supply voltage, 0.5 V. The power dissipation of the proposed fNEO spike detector and ED spike detector are only 258.7 and 129.4 nW, respectively. The quantitative investigation shown in the paper indicates that both fNEO and ED spike detectors achieves superior performance than the conventional NEO spike detector. Considering its lowest power dissipation, the ED spike detector is selected for our application. Further statistical evaluations based on the true positive and false positive detection rate proves that the ED spike detectors achieves higher detection rate than that of the conventional NEO spike detector but dissipates 48 % less power.
    Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing 09/2014; 80(3):449-457. DOI:10.1007/s10470-014-0311-3 · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Due to their orthogonality and nearly constant pulse widths, Modified Hermite Pulses (MHPs) have shown a great potential to enhance the data rate of UWB communications by creating M-ary or multiple access parallel systems. However, the potential high power dissipation required by the pulse set generation and the frequency shifting has limited their utilization in practice. In this paper, we propose a novel computation-efficient model for MHP set generators. Compared with existing models, the proposed model has made it feasible to design a power-efficient MHP set generator. Utilizing our proposed model along with neuromorphic circuit level implementations, we have developed an ultra-low power architecture for MHP set generation for sub-GHz (0 - 960 MHz) UWB communications. Results from both the mathematical analysis and the design layout simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme for the design of a power-efficient MHP set generator.
    2014 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS); 06/2014
  • Sami Smaili, Yehia Massoud
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    ABSTRACT: Random demodulation provides a hardware-compact architecture for realizing compressive sensing systems. A random demodulator is realized by a mixer, with a random signal as the oscillator, and a low pass filter. In order to recover the original signal from the compressive sensing measurements, accurate modeling of the hardware components is needed. Typically, the reconstruction model assumes the low pass filter to be an ideal integrator. While this assumption is valid at low frequencies, it poses tremendous challenges at frequencies higher than 50MHz. In this paper, we provide an accurate and efficient model for the random demodulator that takes into account the actual structure of the filter. Using our model at reconstruction allows random demodulation for bandwidths extending to the GHz range, while, as we demonstrate, assuming an ideal integrator at reconstruction severely limits the system bandwidth.
    2014 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS); 06/2014
  • Sami Smaili, Yehia Massoud
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we derive conditions for bounding the state change in a memristor due to an applied signal. The main memristor functionality is a programmable resistor, but its resistance changes due to the signal passing through it. Therefore, it is necessary to guarantee that any signal through the memristor causes a small resistance change as tolerable by the application. The derived conditions relate the desired bound on the resistance change to a bound on the signal flux through the memristor. We show examples for the case of a sinusoidal signal and demonstrate the impact of the derived conditions on the design of memristor-based systems.
    2014 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS); 06/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Meeting the pressing power and bandwidth requirements of modern communication systems requires the development of highly efficient reconfigurable transceivers. On the receiver side, we present a new class of reconfigurable receiver that utilizes random projections to balance the power-bandwidth tradeoff. Such random projection front-ends are ubiquitous and allow the use of sub-Nyquist ADCs. These systems utilize high speed DACs, typically found in transmitters, to generate high fidelity random signals. The emergence of RF-DACs, used for direct digital-to-RF synthesis, can be leveraged for random projection reconfigurable receivers. However, the need for high output power and linearity in both the transmitter and receiver DACs forces an evaluation of RF-DAC topologies with respect to drain efficiency. In this paper, the power efficiencies of several RF-DAC topologies are compared.
    2014 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS); 06/2014
  • Sami Smaili, Yehia Massoud
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    ABSTRACT: In this letter, we propose a new approach to reconfigurable receivers using random acquisition techniques. Random projections have been widely used within the context of compressive sensing for sub-Nyquist signal acquisition. In the system we propose, we design the random sensing signals so as to filter undesired components in the signal and result in measurements equivalent to those obtained had the signal been filtered prior to acquisition. Because the random signals are digitally generated, the system is reconfigurable; the signal's components to be filtered can be changed by changing the digitally generated random signals. The system digitizes the measurements at a rate proportional to the desired bandwidth only, not the total signal bandwidth.
    01/2014; 3(6):561-564. DOI:10.1109/LWC.2014.2354354
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a low-noise gain-tunable biopotential amplifier that is designed based on a folded-cascode structure. Sub-threshold and self-biasing techniques are employed to achieve a low-noise and low-power amplification. With a bias-current tuning block, the gain of the proposed biopotential amplifier can be precisely adjusted. Designed in a standard 0.13 μm CMOS process, the proposed amplifier provides a 5.9 kHz bandwidth and 30.1 dB gain with 732 nW power. The input-referred noise over the entire bandwidth is 4.3 μVrms , equivalent to a noise-efficiency factor of 2.48.
    Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing 02/2013; 74(2). DOI:10.1007/s10470-012-0013-7 · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a low-power, biologically-inspired silicon neuron based implementation of a chaotic oscillator circuit. The silicon neuron structure is based on Hodgkin–Huxley neuron model. Subthreshold MOSFET and current reuse techniques have been utilized to achieve a low-power consumption of 180.30 nW for the room temperature (27 °C) and typical process corner. The chaotic behavior of the circuit is confirmed by calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent. A sensitivity analysis of the proposed chaotic oscillator shows that the circuit maintains the chaotic behavior for five different process corners within the temperature range of 0–60 °C.
    Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing 01/2013; 74(1). DOI:10.1007/s10470-012-9922-8 · 0.40 Impact Factor
  • S. Smaili, Y. Massoud
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we propose a reconfigurable receiver that utilizes random demodulation, a compressive sensing architecture for efficient signal projection on a sensing signal. In the proposed system, the sensing signal is designed to annihilate the contribution of undesired frequency components in the collected measurements, thus allowing for the recovery of selected signal bands. The acquisition rate is proportional to the desired signal bandwidth rather than the total bandwidth of the input signal.
    Wireless and Microwave Technology Conference (WAMICON), 2013 IEEE 14th Annual; 01/2013
  • S. Smaili, V. Singal, Y. Massoud
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    ABSTRACT: The random demodulator architecture is a compressive sensing based receiver that allows the reconstruction of frequency-sparse signals from measurements acquired at a rate below the signal's Nyquist rate. This in turn results in tremendous power savings in receivers because of the direct correlation between the power consumption of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) in communication receivers and the sampling rate at which these ADCs operate. In this thesis, we propose design techniques for a robust and efficient random demodulator. The resetting mechanism can pose challenges in practical settings that can degrade the performance of the random demodulator. We propose practical approaches to mitigate the effect of resetting and propose resetting schemes that provide robust performance.
    Circuits and Systems (MWSCAS), 2013 IEEE 56th International Midwest Symposium on; 01/2013
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    ABSTRACT: Spike detectors are important data-compression components for state-of-the-art implantable neural recording microsystems. This paper proposes two improved spike detection algorithms, frequency-enhanced nonlinear energy operator (fNEO) and energy-of-derivative (ED), to solve the sensitivity reduction of a conventional nonlinear energy operator (NEO) in the presence of baseline interference. The proposed methods are implemented in two analog spike detectors with a standard 0.13-μm CMOS process. To achieve an ultra-low-power design, weak-inversion MOSFET based multipliers, adders and derivative circuits are developed to work with a 0.5 V power supply. The power dissipations of the proposed fNEO spike detector and the ED spike detector are 258.7 nW and 129.4 nW, respectively. Quantitative investigations based on the standard deviation and peak-to-clutter ratio of the detected spikes indicate that the proposed spike detector schemes hold higher sensitivity than the conventional NEO based spike detector.
    Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), 2013 IEEE International Symposium on; 01/2013
  • S. Smaili, Y. Massoud
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    ABSTRACT: Memristors-based memories utilize the memristor's resistance programmability and small structure to realize high density non-volatile memories. This programmability arises from the dependence of the memristor's resistance on the magnetic flux and total charge, rather than the voltage and current passing through it. However, a critical requirement in memory applications is that the reading scheme should preserve the memristor state after the read. In this paper, we propose a robust reading scheme for memristor-based memories that uses a differential pair sensing amplifier.
    Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), 2013 IEEE International Symposium on; 01/2013
  • S. Smaili, Y. Massoud
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    ABSTRACT: The use of memristors as nanoscale programmable resistors allows the realization of compact tunable analog components such as tunable gain amplifiers. However, since the memristor's resistance depends on the signal through it, the design of such tunable memristor-based components should account for this memristor resistance change. In this paper, we analyze the effect of the memristor resistance change on the gain of the differential pair amplifier and demonstrate its dependence on the amplifier parameters and the signal frequency.
    Circuits and Systems (MWSCAS), 2013 IEEE 56th International Midwest Symposium on; 01/2013
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    ABSTRACT: Various types of biosignals originating from the human body are being extensively used for diagnostics as well as therapeutic interventions. Low-power biological signal processing necessitates energy-efficient filter blocks for time-frequency analysis. In an attempt to reduce the power consumption of an implantable biosignal processor, this paper presents a neuromorphic low-power bandpass filter with excellent figure-of-merit. The charging and discharging profiles of different ionic channels of a Si neuron are utilized to achieve the bandpass filter characteristics. The entire filter structure constitutes 5 transistors working in the weak-inversion saturation regions. Designed in a standard 0.13-μm CMOS process, the proposed bandpass filter consumes only 5 nW with a 0.5 V supply for a center frequency of 200 Hz. The center frequency can be tuned from 150 Hz to 1.5 KHz. The Monte Carlo simulation reveals 58 μVrms input-referred noise and 1% THD for 7 mVp-p of input signal. The proposed architecture also demonstrates excellent figure-of-merit.
    Wireless and Microwave Technology Conference (WAMICON), 2013 IEEE 14th Annual; 01/2013
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    ABSTRACT: Power dissipation of bioamplifiers has become one of the most critical factors for up-to-date implantable neural recording microsystems as the increasing of recording channels. This paper presents an ultra-low-power bioamplifier which is designed for the very-large-scale integration of neural recordings. To reduce the power, the proposed bioamplifier is designed to work with a 0.5 V power supply and all MOSFETs operate at weak inversion region. Both folded-cascode and wide-swing structures are employed to fully exploit the output swing. By producing a 18:1 bias current ratio between input transistors and load current mirror, the noise performance of the proposed bioamplifier is optimized for the given power dissipation. Designed in a 0.13-μm CMOS process, the proposed bioamplifier consumes only 61.7 nW power to obtain a gain of 23.8 dB and a bandwidth of 3.6 KHz. The input-referred noise over the entire bandwidth is 12.7 μVrms, corresponding to a noise-efficiency factor of 3.1.
    Wireless and Microwave Technology Conference (WAMICON), 2013 IEEE 14th Annual; 01/2013
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a compact, ultra-low-power implementation of the bursting Hodgkin–Huxley model-based silicon neuron. The Hodgkin–Huxley model is a neuron imitation that consists of two calcium current channels, a potassium current channel and a leakage current channel. In the proposed architecture, the calcium and the potassium current channels have been implemented using a sigmoid-function structure, a log-domain filter, and a linear transconductor. Different neuronal signals can be generated by changing the value of the capacitor in the log-domain filter. The proposed silicon neuron is capable of generating four different outputs, namely, spiking, spiking with latency, bursting, and chaotic signals. Ultra-low-power consumption is achieved by current-reuse technique and subthreshold region operation of MOSFETs. The circuit is designed using 0.13 μm standard CMOS process. The entire design uses 43 transistors, with a total power consumption of only 43 nW.
    Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing 10/2012; 73(1). DOI:10.1007/s10470-012-9888-6 · 0.40 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 06/2012; 72(8 Supplement):4055-4055. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2012-4055 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The advent of molecularly targeted therapies requires effective identification of the various cell types of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Currently, cell type diagnosis is performed using small biopsies or cytology specimens that are often insufficient for molecular testing after morphologic analysis. Thus, the ability to rapidly recognize different cancer cell types, with minimal tissue consumption, would accelerate diagnosis and preserve tissue samples for subsequent molecular testing in targeted therapy. We report a label-free molecular vibrational imaging framework enabling three-dimensional (3-D) image acquisition and quantitative analysis of cellular structures for identification of NSCLC cell types. This diagnostic imaging system employs superpixel-based 3-D nuclear segmentation for extracting such disease-related features as nuclear shape, volume, and cell-cell distance. These features are used to characterize cancer cell types using machine learning. Using fresh unstained tissue samples derived from cell lines grown in a mouse model, the platform showed greater than 97% accuracy for diagnosis of NSCLC cell types within a few minutes. As an adjunct to subsequent histology tests, our novel system would allow fast delineation of cancer cell types with minimum tissue consumption, potentially facilitating on-the-spot diagnosis, while preserving specimens for additional tests. Furthermore, 3-D measurements of cellular structure permit evaluation closer to the native state of cells, creating an alternative to traditional 2-D histology specimen evaluation, potentially increasing accuracy in diagnosing cell type of lung carcinomas.
    Journal of Biomedical Optics 06/2012; 17(6):066017. DOI:10.1117/1.JBO.17.6.066017 · 2.75 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Hamid Nejati, Ahmad Beirami, Yehia Massoud
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    ABSTRACT: Tent map is a discrete-time piecewise-affine I/O characteristic curve, which is used for chaos-based applications, such as true random number generation. However, tent map suffers from the inability to maintain the output state confined to the input range under noise and process variations. In this paper, we propose a modified tent map, which is interchangeable with the tent map for practical applications. In the proposed modified tent map, the confinement problem is solved while maintaining the functionality of the tent map. We also demonstrate simulation results for the circuit implementation of the presented modified tent map for true random number generation.
    Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems 05/2012; DOI:10.1109/MWSCAS.2008.4616876
  • S. Smaili, Y. Massoud
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    ABSTRACT: The tremendous advancement in communications technology and its use in a wide range of applications have increased the importance of high bandwidth reconfigurable receivers that can monitor a large bandwidth and be reconfigured to receive signals within a specific sub-band. Because of the stringent power and size requirements in most applications for communications systems, it is important to achieve such high surveillance bandwidth and reconfigurability with the minimum possible power consumption and hardware components. In this paper we propose a high bandwidth radio receiver based on the newly emerging theory of compressive sensing. The proposed receiver can reconstruct signals in a specific sub-band within a wide surveillance band using an analog-to-digital converter running at a rate comparable to the sub-band bandwidth, and much less than the surveillance bandwidth. The desired band to be reconstructed can be changed in software thus eliminating the use of many bandpass filters.
    Wireless and Microwave Technology Conference (WAMICON), 2012 IEEE 13th Annual; 01/2012

Publication Stats

4k Citations
87.24 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2014
    • Worcester Polytechnic Institute
      • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
      Worcester, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2011–2013
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
      Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • 2011–2012
    • Weill Cornell Medical College
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2005–2012
    • Rice University
      • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2002–2003
    • Synopsys
      Mountain View, California, United States
  • 1996–2002
    • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
      • • Research Laboratory of Electronics
      • • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States