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Publications (3)6.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Peritoneal membrane damage induced by peritoneal dialysis (PD) is largely associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of mesothelial cells (MCs), which is believed to be a result mainly of the glucose degradation products (GDPs) present in PD solutions. This study investigated the impact of bicarbonate-buffered, low-GDP PD solution (BicaVera: Fresenius Medical Care, Bad Homburg, Germany) on EMT of MCs in vitro and ex vivo. In vitro studies: Omentum-derived MCs were incubated with lactate-buffered standard PD fluid or BicaVera fluid diluted 1:1 with culture medium. Ex vivo studies: From 31 patients randomly distributed to either standard or BicaVera solution and followed for 24 months, effluents were collected every 6 months for determination of EMT markers in effluent MCs. Culturing of MCs with standard fluid in vitro resulted in morphology change to a non-epithelioid shape, with downregulation of E-cadherin (indicative of EMT) and strong induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. By contrast, in vitro exposure of MCs to bicarbonate/low-GDP solution had less impact on both EMT parameters. Ex vivo studies partially confirmed the foregoing results. The BicaVera group, with a higher prevalence of the non-epithelioid MC phenotype at baseline (for unknown reasons), showed a clear and significant trend to gain and maintain an epithelioid phenotype at medium- and longer-term and to show fewer fibrogenic characteristics. By contrast, the standard solution group demonstrated a progressive and significantly higher presence of the non-epithelioid phenotype. Compared with effluent MCs having an epithelioid phenotype, MCs with non-epithelioid morphology showed significantly lower levels of E-cadherin and greater levels of fibronectin and VEGF. In comparing the BicaVera and standard solution groups, MCs from the standard solution group showed significantly higher secretion of interleukin 8 and lower secretion of collagen I, but no differences in the levels of other EMT-associated molecules, including fibronectin, VEGF, E-cadherin, and transforming growth factor β1. Peritonitis incidence was similar in both groups. Functionally, the use of BicaVera fluid was associated with higher transport of small molecules and lower ultrafiltration capacity. Effluent MCs grown ex vivo from patients treated with bicarbonate/low-GDP BicaVera fluid showed a trend to acquire an epithelial phenotype, with lower production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (such as interleukin 8) than was seen with MCs from patients treated with a lactate-buffered standard PD solution.
    Peritoneal dialysis international : journal of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis. 01/2012; 32(3):292-304.
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    ABSTRACT: Peritoneal membrane deterioration during peritoneal dialysis (PD) is associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of mesothelial cells (MC), which is believed to be mainly due to glucose degradation products (GDPs) present in PD solutions. Here we investigate the impact of GDPs in PD solutions on the EMT of MC in vitro and ex vivo. For in vitro studies, omentum-derived MC were incubated with standard PD fluid or low-GDP solution diluted 1:1 with culture medium. For ex vivo studies, 33 patients, who were distributed at random to either the 'standard' or the 'low GDP' groups, were followed over 24 months. Effluents were collected every 6 months to determine EMT markers in effluent MC. Exposure of MC to standard fluid in vitro resulted in morphological change into a non-epitheloid shape, down-regulation of E-cadherin, indicative of EMT, and in a strong induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. In contrast, in vitro exposure of MC to low-GDP solution did not lead to these phenotype changes. This could be confirmed ex vivo, as the prevalence of non-epitheloid phenotype of MC in the standard group was significantly higher with increasing PD duration and MC isolated from this group showed significantly higher levels of EMT-associated molecules including fibronectin, collagen I, VEGF, IL-8 and TGF-β levels when compared with the low-GDP group. Over time, the expression of E-cadherin also decreased in the standard but increased in the low-GDP group. In addition, the levels of EMT-associated molecules (fibronectin, VEGF and IL-8) increased in the standard but decreased in the low-GDP group. A similar trend was also observed for collagen I and for TGF-β (for the first year), but did not reach global statistical significance. Accordingly, effluent MC with non-epitheloid morphology showed significantly lower levels of E-cadherin and greater levels of fibronectin, collagen I, VEGF and IL 8 when compared with MC with epitheloid phenotype. The incidence of peritonitis did not significantly influence these results. Drop-out due to technique failure was less in the 'balance' group. The functional, renal and peritoneal evaluation of patients being treated with either standard or 'balance' fluid did not show any significant difference over time. MC from PD effluent of patients treated with a PD fluid containing low GDP levels show fewer signs of EMT and the respective molecules than MC from patients treated with standard fluid, indicating a better preservation of the peritoneal membrane structure and a favourable outcome in patients using low-GDP fluid. It also confirms the hypothesis that the protection of EMT by GDP-reduced fluids is also present in vivo.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 01/2011; 26(1):282-91. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High peritoneal transport has been associated with poorer outcome in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, but not necessarily because of PD-dependent conditions. Our primary objective was to analyse the influences of baseline peritoneal small solute transport and ultrafiltration (UF) capacity on patient and technique survival, after adjusting for comorbid conditions. A secondary objective was to determine whether high transport was associated with basal comorbidity. In this prospective observational patient/technique survival study, we followed 410 patients who started PD. At the baseline, we collected data to define comorbidities, tally the Charlson index, determine the baseline mass transfer area coefficients (MTAC) of urea and creatinine, net UF, plasma albumin and residual renal function (RRF). No data other than the information on patient and technique survival were recorded after baseline. The mean follow-up was 33 +/- 28 months. Dropouts during the study were due to renal transplantation in 140 cases, death in 142 cases and transfer to haemodialysis (HD) in 77 cases. Patients with inherent UF deficiency, high transport rate or both were not significantly different in the survival analysis from the rest. In the Cox hazards analysis, only age, Charlson index and a lower RRF were the significant mortality risk factors. None of the baseline parameters studied was a predictor of technique failure. High transporter patients had lower plasma albumin and UF capacity, comorbidity and more frequent liver diseases than the rest. Moderate to severe liver disease (n = 14) was significantly associated with the inherent high transport status, but was never accompanied by UF failure (UFF). UFF patients showed higher RRF, creatinine-MTAC and age. Neither the high transport nor the inherent UFF status has any influence on patient and technique survival. The inherent high small solute transport status is associated with hypoalbuminaemia and a greater comorbidity index. The Charlson index, age and lower RRF are the only independent predictors of mortality. Technique dropout is not predicted by any of the variables studied at the baseline.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 02/2007; 22(1):218-23. · 3.37 Impact Factor