Fernando Revert

Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe, Valenza, Valencia, Spain

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Publications (17)64.68 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Goodpasture antigen-binding protein-1 (GPBP-1) is an exportable non-conventional Ser/Thr kinase that regulates glomerular basement membrane collagen organization. Here we provide evidence that GPBP-1 accumulates in the cytoplasm of differentiating mouse myoblasts prior to myosin synthesis. Myoblasts deficient in GPBP-1 display defective myofibril formation, whereas myofibrils assemble with enhanced efficiency in those overexpressing GPBP-1. We also show that GPBP-1 targets the previously unidentified GIP130 (GPBP-interacting protein of 130 kDa), which binds to myosin and promotes its myofibrillar assembly. This report reveals that GPBP-1 directs myofibril formation, an observation that expands its reported role in supramolecular organization of structural proteins to the intracellular compartment.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 10/2011; 286(40):35030-35043. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Goodpasture antigen-binding protein-1 (GPBP-1) is an exportable non-conventional Ser/Thr kinase that regulates glomerular basement membrane collagen organization. Here we provide evidence that GPBP-1 accumulates in the cytoplasm of differentiating mouse myoblasts prior to myosin synthesis. Myoblasts deficient in GPBP-1 display defective myofibril formation, whereas myofibrils assemble with enhanced efficiency in those overexpressing GPBP-1. We also show that GPBP-1 targets the previously unidentified GIP130 (GPBP-interacting protein of 130 kDa), which binds to myosin and promotes its myofibrillar assembly. This report reveals that GPBP-1 directs myofibril formation, an observation that expands its reported role in supramolecular organization of structural proteins to the intracellular compartment.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 08/2011; 286(40):35030-43. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase activity of human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) and the expression of Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a nonconventional Ser/Thr kinase for the type IV collagen of basement membrane, are regulated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). The pro-inflammatory cytokine stimulates kinase activity of hBVR and activates NF-κB, a transcriptional regulator of GPBP mRNA. Increased GPBP activity is associated with several autoimmune conditions, including Goodpasture syndrome. Here we show that in HEK293A cells hBVR binds to GPBP and down-regulates its TNF-α-stimulated kinase activity; this was not due to a decrease in GPBP expression. Findings with small interfering RNA to hBVR and to the p65 regulatory subunit of NF-κB show the hBVR role in the initial stimulation of GPBP expression by TNF-α-activated NF-κB; hBVR was not a factor in mediating GPBP mRNA stability. The interacting domain was mapped to the 281CX10C motif in the C-terminal 24 residues of hBVR. A 7-residue peptide, KKRILHC281, corresponding to the core of the consensus D(δ)-Box motif in the interacting domain, was as effective as the intact 296-residue hBVR polypeptide in inhibiting GPBP kinase activity. GPBP neither regulated hBVR expression nor TNF-α dependent NF-κB expression. Collectively, our data reveal that hBVR is a regulator of the TNF-α-GPBP-collagen type IV signaling cascade and uncover a novel biological interaction that may be of relevance in autoimmune pathogenesis.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 04/2010; 285(17):12551-12558. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase activity of human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) and the expression of Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a nonconventional Ser/Thr kinase for the type IV collagen of basement membrane, are regulated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha). The pro-inflammatory cytokine stimulates kinase activity of hBVR and activates NF-kappaB, a transcriptional regulator of GPBP mRNA. Increased GPBP activity is associated with several autoimmune conditions, including Goodpasture syndrome. Here we show that in HEK293A cells hBVR binds to GPBP and down-regulates its TNF-alpha-stimulated kinase activity; this was not due to a decrease in GPBP expression. Findings with small interfering RNA to hBVR and to the p65 regulatory subunit of NF-kappaB show the hBVR role in the initial stimulation of GPBP expression by TNF-alpha-activated NF-kappaB; hBVR was not a factor in mediating GPBP mRNA stability. The interacting domain was mapped to the (281)CX(10)C motif in the C-terminal 24 residues of hBVR. A 7-residue peptide, KKRILHC(281), corresponding to the core of the consensus D(delta)-Box motif in the interacting domain, was as effective as the intact 296-residue hBVR polypeptide in inhibiting GPBP kinase activity. GPBP neither regulated hBVR expression nor TNF-alpha dependent NF-kappaB expression. Collectively, our data reveal that hBVR is a regulator of the TNF-alpha-GPBP-collagen type IV signaling cascade and uncover a novel biological interaction that may be of relevance in autoimmune pathogenesis.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 02/2010; 285(17):12551-8. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Goodpasture-antigen binding protein (GPBP) is a nonconventional Ser/Thr kinase for basement membrane type IV collagen. Various studies have questioned these findings and proposed that GPBP serves as transporter of ceramide between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Here we show that cells expressed at least two GPBP isoforms resulting from canonical (77-kDa) and noncanonical (91-kDa) mRNA translation initiation. The 77-kDa polypeptide interacted with type IV collagen and localized as a soluble form in the extracellular compartment. The 91-kDa polypeptide and its derived 120-kDa polypeptide associated with cellular membranes and regulated the extracellular levels of the 77-kDa polypeptide. A short motif containing two phenylalanines in an acidic tract and the 26-residue Ser-rich region were required for efficient 77-kDa polypeptide secretion. Removal of the 26-residue Ser-rich region by alternative exon splicing rendered the protein cytosolic and sensitive to the reduction of sphingomyelin cellular levels. These and previous data implicate GPBPs in a multicompartmental program for protein secretion (i.e. type IV collagen) that includes: 1) phosphorylation and regulation of protein molecular/supramolecular organization and 2) interorganelle ceramide trafficking and regulation of protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 10/2008; 283(44):30246-55. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The noncollagenous-1 domain of the α3 chain of collagen IV networks of basement membranes is the target of an antibody-mediated inflammatory response in Goodpasture autoimmune disease. This domain when excised from basement membranes by bacterial collagenase digestion exists in two molecular forms, MH and ML, that differ in cleavage site and mobility in SDS-PAGE. In the present study, MH and ML were shown to also differ with respect to epitope exposure, susceptibility to endoprotease digestion, and redox states of specific cystene residues, as determined by MS. Moreover, MH and ML assemble to form different quaternary structures, critically influencing pathogenic epitope(s) exposure and autoantibody binding. Collectively, our findings reveal that MH and ML are conformational isomers stabilized by a distinct disulfide bond connectivity, and coexist in basement membranes. The hitherto unrecognized conformational diversification of the Goodpasture autoantigen may be of relevance in pathogenesis.
    Proteomics 01/2008; 8(1):217-217. · 4.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increased expression of Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a protein that binds and phosphorylates basement membrane collagen, has been associated with immune complex-mediated pathogenesis. However, recent reports have questioned this biological function and proposed that GPBP serves as a cytosolic ceramide transporter (CERT(L)). Thus, the role of GPBP in vivo remains unknown. New Zealand White (NZW) mice are considered healthy animals although they convey a genetic predisposition for immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Here we show that NZW mice developed age-dependent lupus-prone autoimmune response and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis characterized by elevated GPBP, glomerular basement membrane (GBM) collagen disorganization and expansion, and deposits of IgA on disrupted GBM. Transgenic overexpression of human GPBP (hGPBP) in non-lupus-prone mice triggered similar glomerular abnormalities including deposits of IgA on a capillary GBM that underwent dissociation, in the absence of an evident autoimmune response. We provide in vivo evidence that GPBP regulates GBM collagen organization and its elevated expression causes dissociation and subsequent accumulation of IgA on the GBM. Finally, we describe a previously unrecognized pathogenic mechanism that may be relevant in human primary immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis.
    American Journal Of Pathology 12/2007; 171(5):1419-30. · 4.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The noncollagenous-1 domain of the alpha3 chain of collagen IV networks of basement membranes is the target of an antibody-mediated inflammatory response in Goodpasture autoimmune disease. This domain when excised from basement membranes by bacterial collagenase digestion exists in two molecular forms, M(H) and M(L), that differ in cleavage site and mobility in SDS-PAGE. In the present study, M(H) and M(L) were shown to also differ with respect to epitope exposure, susceptibility to endoprotease digestion, and redox states of specific cystene residues, as determined by MS. Moreover, M(H) and M(L) assemble to form different quaternary structures, critically influencing pathogenic epitope(s) exposure and autoantibody binding. Collectively, our findings reveal that M(H) and M(L) are conformational isomers stabilized by a distinct disulfide bond connectivity, and coexist in basement membranes. The hitherto unrecognized conformational diversification of the Goodpasture autoantigen may be of relevance in pathogenesis.
    Proteomics 05/2006; 6 Suppl 1:S237-44. · 4.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Goodpasture antigen-binding protein, GPBP, is a serine/threonine kinase whose relative expression increases in autoimmune processes. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine implicated in autoimmune pathogenesis. Here we show that COL4A3BP, the gene encoding GPBP, maps head-to-head with POLK, the gene encoding for DNA polymerase kappa (pol kappa), and shares with it a 140-bp promoter containing a Sp1 site, a TATA-like element, and a nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB)-like site. These three elements cooperate in the assembly of a bidirectional transcription complex containing abundant Sp1 and little NFkappaB that is more efficient in the POLK direction. Tumour necrosis factor cell induction is associated with Sp1 release, NFkappaB recruitment and assembly of a complex comparatively more efficient in the COL4A3BP direction. This is accomplished by competitive binding of Sp1 and NFkappaB to a DNA element encompassing a NFkappaB-like site that is pivotal for the 140-bp promoter to function. Consistently, a murine homologous DNA region, which contains the Sp1 site and the TATA-like element but is devoid of the NFkappaB-like site, does not show transcriptional activity in transient gene expression assays. Our findings identify a human-specific TNF-responsive transcriptional unit that locates GPBP in the signalling cascade of TNF and substantiates previous observations, which independently related TNF and GPBP with human autoimmunity.
    FEBS Journal 11/2005; 272(20):5291-305. · 4.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study contributes to clarify the mechanism underlying the high efficacy of hepatocyte gene transfer mediated by hydrodynamic injection. Gene transfer experiments were performed employing the hAAT gene, and the efficacy and differential identification in mouse plasma of human transgene versus mouse gene was assessed by ELISA and proteomic procedures, respectively. By applying different experimental strategies such as cumulative dose-response efficacy, hemodynamic changes reflected by venous pressures, intravital microscopy, and morphological changes established by transmission electron microscopy, we found that: (a) cumulative multiple doses of transgene by hydrodynamic injection are efficient and well tolerated, resulting in therapeutic plasma levels of hAAT; (b) hydrodynamic injection mediates a transient inversion of intrahepatic blood flow, with circulatory stasis for a few minutes mainly in pericentral vein sinusoids; (c) transmission electron microscopy shows hydrodynamic injection to promote massive megafluid endocytic vesicles among hepatocytes around the central vein but not in hepatocytes around the periportal vein. We suggest that the mechanism of hydrodynamic liver gene transfer involves transient inversion of intrahepatic flow, sinusoidal blood stasis, and massive fluid endocytic vesicles in pericentral vein hepatocytes.
    Gene Therapy 07/2005; 12(11):927-35. · 4.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Specific and efficient delivery of genes into targeted cells is a priority objective in non-viral gene therapy. Polyethyleneimine-based polyplexes have been reported to be good non-viral transfection reagents. However, polyplex-mediated DNA delivery occurs through a non-specific mechanism. This article reports the construction of an immunopolyplex, a targeted non-viral vector based on a polyplex backbone, and its application in gene transfer over human lymphoma cell lines.Methods Targeting elements (biotin-labeled antibodies), which should recognize a specific element of the target cell membrane and promote nucleic acid entry into the cell, were attached to the polyplex backbone through a bridge protein (streptavidin). Immunopolyplex transfection activity was studied in several hematological cell lines [Jurkat (CD3+/CD19−), Granta 519 (CD3−/ CD19+), and J.RT3-T3.5 (CD3−/CD19−)] using the EGFP gene as a reporter gene and anti-CD3 and anti-CD19 antibodies as targeting elements. Transfection activity was evaluated via green fluorescence per cell and the percentage of positive cells determined by flow cytometry.ResultsA significant selectivity of gene delivery was observed, since the anti-CD3 immunopolyplex worked only in Jurkat cells while the anti-CD19 immunopolyplex worked only in the Granta cell line. Moreover, transfection of a CD3+/CD3− cell mixture with anti-CD3 immunopolyplexes showed up to 16-fold more transfection in CD3+ than in CD3− cells. Several non-specific transfection reagents showed poor or no transfection activity.Conclusion It is concluded that immunopolyplex is a good non-viral vector for specific and selective nucleic acid delivery. Immunopolyplex design allows easy replacement of the targeting element (antibody) – the streptavidin–polyplex backbone remaining intact – thereby conferring high versatility. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    The Journal of Gene Medicine 02/2002; 4(2):170 - 182. · 2.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DNA complexes formed with nonviral vectors such as polyethylenimine (PEI) or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) are widely used in gene therapy. These complexes prevent the interaction of DNA with the fluorescent probes usually employed to quantify DNA. We thus studied the procedures for DNA quantification from DNA complexes as well as their stability in the presence of DNase or mouse, rat and human sera. Release of the DNA from its complexes was accomplished by increasing the pH of the medium (from 7.3 to 13.4) or by adding heparin. The stability against degradation was tested in vitro, by incubating the complexes at 37 degrees C in the presence of DNase I and sera from the three species. Both high pH and heparin were able to release DNA from its complexes. Naked DNA formed aggregates with serum proteins that delayed electrophoresis migration, and this effect was reversed in the presence of heparin. However, these aggregates did not protect DNA from digestion by serum DNase, and the DNA digesting ability of serum was: mouse>rat>human. The DNA from the complexes was resistant to degradation by DNase I, although a low proportion of DNA from the complexes was partially digested, as determined by electrophoresis. In contrast, PEI-DNA and DOTAP-DNA complexes were stable in the presence of all sera. Heparin and high pH release DNA from its complexes. The order of DNA degradation is: mouse>rat>human, but DOTAP and PEI avoid degradation of DNA by serum compounds.
    Journal of Controlled Release 09/2001; 76(1-2):169-81. · 7.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The growth of new blood vessels is an essential condition for the development of tumors with a diameter greater than 1-2 mm and also for their metastatic dissemination. RNasin, the placental ribonuclease inhibitor, is known to have antiangiogenic activity through the inhibition of angiogenin and basic fibroblast growth factor. Nevertheless, the administration of the recombinant form of a protein poses several limitations; as a result, we have studied the antitumor effect of RNasin in a murine gene therapy model. RNasin cDNA was subcloned into the pcDNA3 expression vector, and the resulting recombinant plasmid was used to transfect the B16 murine melanoma cell line. An RNasin inverted construction was used as control. Mice intravenously injected with clones expressing RNasin showed a significant inhibition of tumor metastatic progression with respect to control groups (P<.001) and survived longer (P<.001). Tissue sections from RNasin-expressing cell tumors showed a lower number of blood vessels when compared to tissue sections from mice lungs that had been inoculated with control cell lines. The results of these experiments show that the genetic modification of tumor cells with RNasin cDNA yields a significant antitumor effect, and suggest that this effect is at least partially the result of angiogenesis inhibition.
    Cancer Gene Therapy 04/2001; 8(4):278-84. · 2.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the present work we set out to apply pharmacodynamic concepts derived from dose-response curves (Potency and Efficacy) to characterize the gene transfer efficiency of a vector:DNA complex. We employed two widely used vectors, the cationic lipid DOTAP (N,N, N-trimethyl 1-2-3-bis (1-oxo-9-octa-decenyl)oxy-(Z, Z)-1-propanaminium methyl sulfate) and the cationic polymer PEI (polyethylenimine, 800 kDa) to transfect several constructions of the green fluorescent protein cDNA. The analysis of dose-response curves indicated that in all cases the goodness-of-fit was > 0.99. Potency is a measure that provides information on gene activity per amount of DNA. Efficacy is a measure of maximum gene expression achievable using a specific vector:DNA complex, and depends on both the intrinsic efficacy of the gene (evaluated using different vectors to transfer the same gene construct) and on vector efficacy in DNA delivery (evaluated using a single vector to deliver different gene constructs). The results suggest that Potency and Efficacy are objective parameters for describing and comparing the goodness of vectors, as well as the intrinsic efficacy of a given gene construct. Furthermore, they are useful tools that may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanistic gene transfer process of each vector.
    Biochemical Pharmacology 12/2000; 60(12):1845-53. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of endothelin on myocardial ischemia and reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs. Animals were submitted to left thoracotomy and 120 min of left anterior descending coronary occlusion, followed by 180 min of reperfusion. Arterial blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG) were recorded in order to analyze heart rate (HR)-pressure product and production of ectopic beats. Infarcted areas were identified by a macroscopic staining method and infarct size was expressed as percentage of risk zone. To inhibit the effects of endothelin in a group of animals, we administered intravenously an endothelin synthesis inhibitor (phosphoramidon) and in another group, an endothelin-1 A receptor blocker (BQ-123). Phosphoramidon decreased the HR-pressure product during reperfusion period, and both, phosphoramidon and BQ-123 decreased infarct size by 40% and the number of ventricular ectopic beats by 88% and 68%, respectively, as compared to the saline treated dogs. In conclusion, endothelin seems to play a deleterious role on the myocardium submitted to ischemia and reperfusion.
    General Pharmacology 10/2000; 35(3):143-7.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of endothelium-derived nitric oxide and prostaglandins on the contractile responses of isolated dog pulmonary arteries to electrical field stimulation and noradrenaline. Electrical field stimulation (1-8 Hz, 20 v, 0.25 ms duration, for 30 s) produced frequency-dependent contractions that were abolished by tetrodotoxin, guanethidine and, prazosin (all at 10(-6) M). Noradrenaline induced concentration-dependent contractions with an EC50, of 1.85 x 10(-6) M. The increases in tension induced by electrical stimulation and noradrenaline were of greater magnitude in arteries denuded of endothelium. In segments with endothelium, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-4) M) or indomethacin (10(-5) M) had no effects on the basal tone, but significantly enhanced the neurogenic and noradrenaline-induced contractions. The potentiation by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester of electrical stimulation-induced contractile responses was partially reversed by L-arginine (10(-4) M). In the presence of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester together with indomethacin the electrical stimulation-induced contractile responses were higher than those obtained when only N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or indomethacin was used. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and indomethacin did not influence neurogenic-induced contractile responses of endothelium-denuded arteries. The results suggest that endothelial cells of isolated dog pulmonary arteries depress the contractile response to electrical field stimulation of intramural nerves and that endothelium-derived dilator prostaglandins and nitric oxide may interact to inhibit contractile effects of adrenergic stimulation.
    General Pharmacology 06/1999; 32(5):583-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Specific and efficient delivery of genes into targeted cells is a priority objective in non-viral gene therapy. Polyethyleneimine-based polyplexes have been reported to be good non-viral transfection reagents. However, polyplex-mediated DNA delivery occurs through a non-specific mechanism. This article reports the construction of an immunopolyplex, a targeted non-viral vector based on a polyplex backbone, and its application in gene transfer over human lymphoma cell lines. Targeting elements (biotin-labeled antibodies), which should recognize a specific element of the target cell membrane and promote nucleic acid entry into the cell, were attached to the polyplex backbone through a bridge protein (streptavidin). Immunopolyplex transfection activity was studied in several hematological cell lines [Jurkat (CD3+/CD19-), Granta 519 (CD3-/ CD19+), and J.RT3-T3.5 (CD3-/CD19-)] using the EGFP gene as a reporter gene and anti-CD3 and anti-CD19 antibodies as targeting elements. Transfection activity was evaluated via green fluorescence per cell and the percentage of positive cells determined by flow cytometry. A significant selectivity of gene delivery was observed, since the anti-CD3 immunopolyplex worked only in Jurkat cells while the anti-CD19 immunopolyplex worked only in the Granta cell line. Moreover, transfection of a CD3+/CD3- cell mixture with anti-CD3 immunopolyplexes showed up to 16-fold more transfection in CD3+ than in CD3- cells. Several non-specific transfection reagents showed poor or no transfection activity. It is concluded that immunopolyplex is a good non-viral vector for specific and selective nucleic acid delivery. Immunopolyplex design allows easy replacement of the targeting element (antibody) - the streptavidin-polyplex backbone remaining intact - thereby conferring high versatility.
    The Journal of Gene Medicine 4(2):170-82. · 2.16 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

210 Citations
64.68 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2011
    • Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
  • 2006
    • Instituto de Biomedicina
      Caracas, Distrito Federal, Venezuela
  • 2001–2002
    • University of Valencia
      • Departamento de Farmacología
      Valencia, Valencia, Spain
    • Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain