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Publications (4)13.03 Total impact

  • Rudolf E Noble
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    ABSTRACT: The advent of depletion of the ozone layer with the reported subsequent increase of UV-irradiation has led to heightened interest in the effects of UV light on cellular organisms. In this study, the effects of UV-irradiation was studied on the germination of kale, cabbage, radish and agave seeds. In all cases, UV light sped the germination of these seeds but the subsequent growth of the seedlings was markedly retarded. Pictures, taken at day 15, are presented to show this latter effect and the possible effects of UV-irradiation on seed germination are discussed.
    Science of The Total Environment 12/2002; 299(1-3):173-6. · 3.26 Impact Factor
  • Rudolf E Noble
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    ABSTRACT: Human nasal secretions are comprised of lysozyme and albumin as their main protein components. Lysozyme, an anti-microbial substance, is produced by nasal serous cells while albumin is obtained, primarily, from increased nasal vasculature permeability. We measured lysozyme levels in nasal secretions following challenge by a variety of non-infectious environmental contaminants. The methodology given presents a simple and rapid method of collecting nasal secretions and determining their lysozyme content, a technique which can be used for a host of environmental irritants.
    Science of The Total Environment 03/2002; 284(1-3):263-6. · 3.26 Impact Factor
  • R E Noble
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of cigarette smoke was studied on the germination of radish, kale, lettuce, amaranth, wheat, rice, barley and rye seeds. It was found that such smoke markedly retarded, in all cases, the rate of germination. Furthermore, cigarette smoke caused a retardation of the levels of certain enzymes (alpha-amylase or lysozyme) known to be significant in the germination of these seeds.
    Science of The Total Environment 03/2001; 267(1-3):177-9. · 3.26 Impact Factor
  • R E Noble
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    ABSTRACT: The uptake of Ca2+ and Mg2+ by human scalp hair from waters of 24 different locations throughout the world was determined. The uptake was found to vary markedly depending on the initial total hardness and pH of the water. Water of high initial total hardness and/or high initial pH were found, in general, to result in more hair adsorption of these alkaline earth cations. When hair is washed with these differing waters, varying effects are then found in the eventual coiffure.
    Science of The Total Environment 11/1999; 239(1-3):189-93. · 3.26 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3 Citations
13.03 Total Impact Points

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