Olga D Taraschenko

Albany Medical College, Albany, New York, United States

Are you Olga D Taraschenko?

Claim your profile

Publications (13)34.98 Total impact

  • Olga D. Taraschenko, Karen Powers
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Tick paralysis is an arthropod-transmitted disease causing potentially lethal progressive ascending weakness. The presenting symptoms of tick paralysis overlap with those of acute inflammatory diseases of the peripheral nervous system and spinal cord; thus, the condition is increasingly misdiagnosed, leading to unnecessary treatments and prolonged hospitalization. Patient A two-year-old girl residing in northern New York and having no history of travel to areas endemic to ticks presented with rapidly progressing ascending paralysis, hyporeflexia, and intact sensory examination. Investigation included blood and serum toxicology screens, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and brain imaging. With all tests negative, the patient’s condition was initially misdiagnosed as botulism; however, an engorged tick was later found attached to the head skin. Following tick removal, the patient’s weakness promptly improved with no additional interventions. Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of thorough skin examination in all cases of acute progressive weakness and the necessity to include tick paralysis in the differential diagnosis of paralysis occurring in nonendemic areas.
    Pediatric Neurology 01/2014; · 1.42 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Granulomatous polyangiitis (GPA), also known as Wegener granulomatosis, is a systemic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis that infrequently affects the central nervous system. We report a 41-year-old man with lateral medullary infarction who developed rapidly progressive renal failure. He was diagnosed with GPA based on positive serum c-ANCA and antiproteinase 3 antibodies and demonstration of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis on kidney biopsy. He was treated with Coumadin, pulse steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. He had resolution of his neurologic deficits and improvement in renal function. This case report highlights the importance to consider GPA vasculitis in the differential diagnosis of stroke in patients with development of acute kidney injury.
    Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases: the official journal of National Stroke Association 10/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evidence suggests that the development of diet-induced obesity in males and females might be mediated by distinct mechanisms, warranting different treatment approaches. In previous studies from this laboratory, a high sucrose diet induced excessive weight gain in female but not in male Sprague-Dawley rats, while weight gain in both sexes was similarly attenuated by the administration of a selective antagonist of α3β4 nicotinic receptors, 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC). In the present study, assessment of high-fat induced weight gain, consummatory behavior and biochemical markers of obesity was conducted in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats and the effects of 18-MC treatment were compared in the two sexes. Male rats consuming a high-fat (HF) diet developed excessive weight gain and fat deposition compared to same same-sex controls fed with a low-fat (LF) diet. The development of obesity in these rats was attenuated by repeated administration of 18-MC (20mg/kg, i.p.), which significantly reduced their food intake without altering water intake. In contrast, female rats consuming a HF diet did not become obese and did not respond to 18-MC treatment. These results show that males and females are differentially responsive to HF-induced obesity; the 18-MC data suggest that α3β4 nicotinic receptors may participate in maintaining obesity, possibly becoming a new and important target for anti-obesity agents.
    Physiology & Behavior 02/2011; 103(3-4):308-14. · 3.16 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), a selective antagonist of α3β4 nicotinic receptors, has been previously shown, in rats, to reduce the self-administration of several drugs of abuse, reduce operant responding for sucrose, and prevent the development of sucrose-induced obesity. It has become increasingly apparent that there is a significant overlap between the systems regulating drug reward and food intake, therefore, we investigated whether 18-MC might modulate the effects of ghrelin, one of several orexigenic peptides recently implicated in both feeding and drug reward. In female Sprague-Dawley rats, we determined whether acute 18-MC treatment would reduce both ghrelin-induced increases in sucrose intake and ghrelin-elicited increases in accumbal dopamine levels. Pretreatment with 18-MC (20 mg/kg, i.p.), given prior to the administration of ghrelin (1 μg, lateral ventricle), blocked ghrelin-induced increases in sucrose (5%) intake in a two-bottle open access paradigm. Using in vivo microdialysis, 18-MC (both 20 and 40 mg/kg) prevented ghrelin (2 μg, intraventral tegmental area)-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. 18-MC had no effect on deposition of fat or on serum levels of glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol in ghrelin-treated rats. The present results suggest that one potential mechanism by which 18-MC exerts its effects on palatable food consumption is via modulation of ghrelin's effects.
    Psychopharmacology 01/2011; 215(2):247-56. · 4.06 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evidence suggests that the development of obesity in males and females might be mediated by distinct mechanisms, warranting different treatment approaches. In previous studies from this laboratory, a high sucrose diet induced excessive weight gain in female Sprague-Dawley rats and administration of a selective antagonist of α3β4 nicotinic receptors, 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), prevented this form of obesity. In the present study similar parameters were studied in male rats by using an identical experimental protocol. The effects of repeated administration of 18-MC on body weight gain, deposition of fat, consummatory behavior and biochemical markers of obesity in male rats were also assessed. In contrast to females, males consuming ad libitum quantities of sucrose solution (30%) in combination with normal chow did not become obese; they did not gain excessive weight nor show excessive fat deposition. Repeated administration of 18-MC (20mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated weight gain in both sucrose-consuming and control animals without altering food or fluid intake. The present results indicate that males and females are differentially responsive to high carbohydrate-diet obesity. Such gender disparities could be secondary to sex-specific alterations in cholinergic mechanisms of feeding and body weight regulation.
    Physiology & Behavior 10/2010; 102(2):126-31. · 3.16 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), a selective antagonist of alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors, has been shown to reduce the self-administration of several drugs of abuse. Recently, this agent has also been shown to attenuate sucrose reward, decrease sucrose intake and prevent the development of sucrose-induced obesity in rats. The present experiments were designed to determine whether the latter effect was due to an 18-MC-induced conditioned taste aversion to sucrose. Both 18-MC (20mg/ kg, i.p.) and control agent, lithium chloride (100mg/kg, i.p.), reduced sucrose intake 24h after association with sucrose; however, only lithium chloride reduced sucrose intake 72h later. Consistent with previous data, 18-MC appears to have proactive effect for 24h and it does not induce a conditioned taste aversion.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 05/2010; 96(3):247-50. · 2.61 Impact Factor
  • Rifat J Hussain, Olga D Taraschenko, Stanley D Glick
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is increasing evidence that the cholinergic habenulo-interpeduncular pathway and the dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway may jointly mediate the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. However, the effects of addictive drug on the functioning of the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway have not been well-characterized. Thus, several drugs of abuse (i.e., nicotine, cocaine, amphetamine) have been shown to alter the morphology of the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway, causing selective degeneration of the cholinergic neurons in this area. On the other hand, morphine was shown to alter the neurochemistry of the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway, inducing biphasic changes in acetylcholine release in the interpeduncular nucleus. In order to determine the effects of cocaine, amphetamine and nicotine on cholinergic neurotransmission in the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway, levels of acetylcholine were assessed during microdialysis in freely moving rats. Nicotine (0.1 and 0.4 mg/kg s.c.) produced a dose-dependent decrease in extracellular levels of acetylcholine, while methamphetamine (1 and 4 mg/kg i.p.) produced an increase in acetylcholine release in the interpeduncular nucleus. Cocaine (5 and 20 mg/kg i.p.) produced a biphasic effect on extracellular acetylcholine release, i.e., a low dose enhanced the release of acetylcholine and a high dose decreased its release. These results suggest that the habenulo-intepeduncular pathway may be a common target for drugs of abuse and, by modulating the mesolimbic pathway, may mediate unique aspects of the rewarding effects of different drugs.
    Neuroscience Letters 09/2008; 440(3):270-4. · 2.03 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Excessive eating often leads to obesity. Although a variety of neurotransmitters and brain regions are involved in modulating food intake, a role of accumbal dopamine is thought to be critical for several aspects of this behavior. Since 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), a selective antagonist of alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors, was previously shown to alter dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens in response to chronic injections of cocaine and morphine, this drug could be a promising therapy for abnormal eating behavior. Assess the effect of 18-MC on the consumption of sucrose (15%) vs. water in a self-administration paradigm and on the intake of freely available palatable fluids (i.e., 5% sucrose, 0.1% saccharin, and 0.6% saline solutions) as well as on water intake. Determine whether repeated administration of 18-MC (20 mg/kg i.p.) affects weight gain, food intake, and fat deposition in rats drinking 30% sucrose solution. Acute administration of 18-MC (10-40 mg/kg i.p.) reduced operant responding for sucrose and decreased ad libitum ingestion of sucrose, saccharin, and saline. The highest dose of 18-MC also reduced consumption of water when palatable fluids were not available. In rats having unlimited access to sucrose (30%), chronic treatment with 18-MC (20 mg/kg i.p.) prevented sucrose-induced increases in body weight, decreased fat deposition, and reduced consumption of sucrose while not altering food intake. These data suggest that antagonism of alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors may be involved in the regulation of intake of palatable substances regardless of its caloric value and may participate in maintaining obesity.
    Psychopharmacology 09/2008; 201(3):339-50. · 4.06 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), a novel iboga alkaloid congener, is a potential treatment for drug addiction. 18-MC has been shown to decrease self-administration of drugs (e.g., morphine, methamphetamine, nicotine) and attenuate opioid withdrawal in rats. In previous studies, systemic pretreatment with 18-MC abolished the sensitized increase in accumbens dopamine levels induced by chronic morphine administration. In vitro studies have shown that 18-MC is a potent antagonist of alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors, and alpha3beta4 antagonism is believed to be the primary mechanism responsible for 18-MC's effects on drug self-administration and possibly on morphine-induced changes in mesolimbic dopamine. While there are very low densities of alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors in the mesolimbic pathway, these receptors are prominently localized in the medial habenula (MHb) and in the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). These nuclei and the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway connecting them are believed to function as part of an alternate reward pathway modulating the dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway known to be involved in drug addiction. In the present study, to determine if 18-MC acts in the MHb or in the IPN, the effects of local infusion of 18-MC into these brain areas were assessed on mesolimbic dopamine responses to acute and repeated morphine treatment. Administration of 18-MC (10 mug) into either the IPN or MHb blocked the sensitized dopamine response to repeated morphine in the nucleus accumbens; 18-MC had no effect on the dopamine response to acute morphine. The results suggest that 18-MC acts in the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway to modulate the effects of repeated morphine in the dopaminergic mesolimbic system.
    Synapse 08/2007; 61(7):547-60. · 2.31 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Owing to multiple anatomical connections and functional interactions between the habenulo-interpeduncular and the mesolimbic pathways, it has been proposed that these systems could together mediate the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. 18-Methoxycoronaridine, an agent that reduces morphine self-administration and attenuates dopamine sensitization in the nucleus accumbens in response to repeated morphine, has been shown to produce these effects by acting in the medial habenula and interpeduncular nucleus. Acetylcholine, one of the predominant neurotransmitters in the interpeduncular nucleus, may be a major determinant of these interactions. To determine if and how morphine acts in the interpeduncular nucleus, the effects of acute and repeated administration of morphine on extracellular acetylcholine levels in this brain area were assessed. In addition, the motor behavior of rats receiving repeated morphine administration was monitored during microdialysis sessions. Acutely, morphine produced a biphasic effect on extracellular acetylcholine levels in the interpeduncular nucleus such that low and high doses of morphine (i.e., 5 and 20mg/kg i.p.) significantly increased and decreased acetylcholine levels, respectively. Repeated administration of the same doses of morphine resulted in tolerance to the inhibitory but not to the stimulatory effects; tolerance was accompanied by sensitization to morphine-induced changes in locomotor activity and stereotypic behavior. The latter results suggest that tolerance to morphine's effect on the cholinergic habenulo-interpeduncular pathway is related to its sensitizing effects on the mesostriatal dopaminergic pathways.
    Neuropharmacology 08/2007; 53(1):18-26. · 4.11 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 18-Methoxyroconaridine (18-MC), a synthetic derivative of ibogaine, reduces morphine self-administration and alleviates several signs of acute opioid withdrawal in rats. Although there is already well documented evidence of the mechanism mediating 18-MC's action to reduce the rewarding effects of morphine, nothing is known about the mechanism responsible for 18-MC's attenuation of opioid withdrawal. In vitro studies have demonstrated that 18-MC is a potent antagonist of alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors (IC50=0.75 microM), which are predominantly located in the medial habenula and interpeduncular nuclei. Previous work indicating that alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors mediate 18-MC's effects on drug self-administration prompted us to assess whether brain areas having high or moderate densities of alpha3beta4 receptors might be involved in 18-MC's modulation of opioid withdrawal. To test this possibility, 18-MC was locally administered into the medial habenula, interpeduncular nucleus and locus coeruleus of morphine-dependent rats; this treatment was followed by naltrexone to precipitate a withdrawal syndrome. Pretreatment with various doses of 18-MC into the locus coeruleus significantly reduced wet-dog shakes, teeth chattering, burying and diarrhea, while pretreatment into the medial habenula attenuated teeth chattering, burying, and weight loss. Some doses of 18-MC administered into the interpeduncular nucleus significantly ameliorated rearing, teeth chattering, and burying, while other doses exacerbated diarrhea and teeth chattering. The present findings suggest that 18-MC may act in all three nuclei to suppress various signs of opioid withdrawal.
    European Journal of Pharmacology 12/2005; 525(1-3):98-104. · 2.59 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 18-Methoxycoronaridine, a synthetic iboga alkaloid congener, has been previously shown to attenuate several signs of morphine withdrawal in rats. The recently discovered action of 18-methoxycoronaridine to block alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors may be responsible for this effect. To test this hypothesis the effects of non-selective alpha3beta4 receptor antagonists, dextromethorphan, mecamylamine, bupropion, and their combinations, were assessed on of acute naltrexone-precipitated (1 mg/kg i.p.) morphine withdrawal in rats. Dextromethorphan (5-40 mg/kg, s.c.), mecamylamine (0.25-4 mg/kg, i.p.) and bupropion (10-30 mg/kg, i.p.) alone produced variable effects on signs of withdrawal. However, two low-dose combinations, i.e., dextromethorphan (5 mg/kg, s.c.) and mecamylamine (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.), mecamylamine (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) and bupropion (10 mg/kg, i.p.) as well as the three-drug combination significantly attenuated diarrhea and weight loss; none of the agents administered alone had these effects. The results of the present study provide evidence that alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors are involved in the expression of at least two signs of opioid withdrawal.
    European Journal of Pharmacology 05/2005; 513(3):207-18. · 2.59 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Improgan is a compound developed from histamine antagonists which shows the pre-clinical profile of a highly effective, non-opioid analgesic when administered into the rodent CNS. Pharmacological studies suggest that improgan activates descending pain-relieving circuits, but the brain and spinal sites of action of this drug have not been previously studied. Presently, the effects of intracerebral and intrathecal microinjections of improgan were evaluated on thermal nociceptive responses in rats. Improgan produced large, dose- and time-related reductions in nociceptive responses following administration into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG), the dorsal PAG, and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). The drug had no measurable effects after injections into the caudate nucleus, basolateral amygdala, hippocampus, ventromedial hypothalamus, superior colliculi, ventrolateral medulla, or the spinal subarachnoid space. Inactivation of the RVM by muscimol microinjections completely attenuated antincociceptive responses produced by intraventricular improgan. These findings, taken with earlier results, show that, like opioids and cannabinoids, improgan acts in the PAG and RVM to activate descending analgesic systems. Unlike these other analgesics, improgan does not act in the spinal cord or in CNS areas outside of the brain stem.
    Brain Research 10/2004; 1021(2):248-55. · 2.88 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

104 Citations
34.98 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2014
    • Albany Medical College
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience
      Albany, New York, United States
  • 2013
    • Albany Stratton VA Medical Center
      Albany, New York, United States