Yasuyuki Tanaka

Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

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Publications (7)15.91 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby gamma-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku for understanding the origin of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS0625-354, and 3C78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS0625-354 and 3C78 to understand these sources within the blazar picture. We found significant gamma-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS0625-354 and 3C78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other gamma-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broad-band spectral energy distributions of PKS0625-354 and 3C78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lac objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR\,I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak ($\sim 10^{16}$ Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously-suggested scenarios for FR I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.
    10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: 3C 66A is an intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lac object detected by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We present a study of the long-term variations of this blazar seen over 2 years at GeV energies with Fermi and in the optical (flux and polarization) and near infrared with the Kanata telescope. In 2008, the first year of the study, we find a correlation between the gamma-ray flux and the measurements taken with the Kanata telescope. This is in contrast to the later measurements performed during 2009--2010 which show only a weak correlation along with a gradual increase of the optical flux. We calculate an external seed photon energy density assuming that the gamma-ray emission is due to external Compton scattering. The energy density of the external photons is found to be higher by a factor of two in 2008 compared to 2009--2010. We conclude that the different behaviors observed between the first year and the later years might be explained by postulating two different emission components.
    Publications- Astronomical Society of Japan 01/2013; · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on the results from {\it Suzaku} X-ray observations of the radio complex region called Kookaburra, which includes two adjacent TeV $\gamma$-ray sources HESS J1418-609 and HESS J1420-607. The {\it Suzaku} observation revealed X-ray diffuse emission around a middle-aged pulsar PSR J1420-6048 and a plausible PWN Rabbit with elongated sizes of $\sigma_{\rm X}=1^{\prime}.66$ and $\sigma_{\rm X}=1^{\prime}.49$, respectively. The peaks of the diffuse X-ray emission are located within the $\gamma$-ray excess maps obtained by H.E.S.S. and the offsets from the $\gamma$-ray peaks are $2^{\prime}.8$ for PSR J1420-6048 and $4^{\prime}.5$ for Rabbit. The X-ray spectra of the two sources were well reproduced by absorbed power-law models with $\Gamma=1.7-2.3$. The spectral shapes tend to become softer according to the distance from the X-ray peaks. Assuming the one zone electron emission model as the first order approximation, the ambient magnetic field strengths of HESS J1420-607 and HESS J1418-609 can be estimated as 3 $\mu$G, and $2.5 \mu$G, respectively. The X-ray spectral and spatial properties strongly support that both TeV sources are pulsar wind nebulae, in which electrons and positrons accelerated at termination shocks of the pulsar winds are losing their energies via the synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering as they are transported outward.
    The Astrophysical Journal 03/2012; 750(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Strong iron fluorescence at 6.4 keV and hard-X-ray emissions from giant molecular clouds in the Galactic center region have been interpreted as reflections of a past outburst of the Sgr A* supermassive black hole. Careful treatment of multiple interactions of photons in a complicated geometry is essential to modeling the reprocessed emissions from the dense clouds. We develop a new calculation framework of X-ray reflection from molecular clouds based on Monte Carlo simulations for accurate interpretation of high-quality observational data. By utilizing this simulation framework, we present the first calculations of morphologies and spectra of the reflected X-ray emission for several realistic models of Sgr B2, which is the most massive molecular cloud in our Galaxy. The morphology of scattered hard X-rays above 20 keV is significantly different from that of iron fluorescence due to their large penetrating power into dense regions of the cloud, probing the structure of the cloud. High-resolution spectra provide quantitative evaluation of the iron line including its Compton shoulder to constrain the mass and the chemical composition of the cloud as well as the luminosity of the illuminating source. These predictions can be checked in the near future with future X-ray missions such as NuStar (hard X-rays) and ASTRO-H (both iron lines and hard X-rays).
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2011; 740(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray (HXR) focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar HXR instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of an indirect imaging system, the derived images have a low dynamic range (typically <10) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the particle acceleration processes which occur there. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding impulsive energy release on the Sun. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for the grazingincidence optics, while the Astro-H team at JAXA/ISAS has provided double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI is a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.
    Proc SPIE 09/2011;
  • 08/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe by performing high-resolution, high-throughput spectroscopy with moderate angular resolution. ASTRO-H covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. ASTRO-H allows a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (5-80 keV) provided by multilayer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3-12 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope (0.4-12 keV) and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector (40-600 keV) . The micro-calorimeter system is developed by an international collaboration led by ISAS/JAXA and NASA. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution of Delta E ~7 eV provided by the micro-calorimeter will enable a wide variety of important science themes to be pursued. Comment: 18 pages, 12 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Instrumentation "Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray"
    10/2010;