L Chérié-Challine

Institut de veille sanitaire, Charenton, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (15)15.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In 2005, following the first cancer plan of the national health authorities, a general cancer registry was established in northern France, in a territory designated as a "zone in proximity to the city of Lille" (ZPL). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the completeness of the registry's first year of incident cancer registration (2005) and to compare the observed cancer incidence in the "ZPL" with the estimated incidence in France. Completeness was assessed using the average number of sources per case, the percentage of histological verification and a method of independent case ascertainment (mortality/incidence ratio). A direct standardization on the world population was used to calculate the ZPL/France ratios of standardized incidence rates. Analyses were conducted for 21 cancer sites. In 2005, 3635 cases of invasive cancer were recorded by the registry. The average number of sources per case was 2.7 and histological proof was available for 91.4% of cases. Mortality/incidence ratios showed satisfactory completeness of the data for men for most cancer sites. For women however, for cancer sites for which the number of cases was low, data will have to be confirmed during the subsequent years of observation. A lack of completeness was found for cutaneous melanoma. In men, an overincidence was identified for cancers of lip-mouth-pharynx, larynx, esophagus, lung, liver, bladder, kidney and colon-rectum. In women, an overincidence has been identified for cancers of lip-mouth-pharynx, liver, bladder, colon-rectum, corpus uteri and ovaries. The first year of incidence validated at the "Registre général des cancers de Lille et de sa région" shows a completeness of records with regards to studied criteria. The comparison with national data shows an overincidence of cancers related to tobacco and alcohol consumption in the geographical area covered by the registry. The incidence of lip-mouth-pharynx cancer in men is the highest of all French registries.
    Revue d Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique 03/2012; 60(2):131-9. · 0.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: French uterine cancer recordings in death certificates include 60% of "uterine cancer, Not Otherwise Specified (NOS)"; this hampers the estimation of mortalities from cervix and corpus uteri cancers. The aims of this work were to study the reliability of uterine cancer recordings in death certificates using a case matching with cancer registries and estimate age-specific proportions of deaths from cervix and corpus uteri cancers among all uterine cancer deaths by a statistical approach that uses incidence and survival data. Deaths from uterine cancer between 1989 and 2001 were extracted from the French National database of causes of death and case-to-case matched to women diagnosed with uterine cancer between 1989 and 1997 in 8 cancer registries. Registry data were considered as "gold-standard". Among the 1825 matched deaths, cancer registries recorded 830 cervix and 995 corpus uteri cancers. In death certificates, 5% and 40% of "true" cervix cancers were respectively coded "corpus" and "uterus, NOS" and 5% and 59% of "true" corpus cancers respectively coded "cervix" and "uterus, NOS". Miscoding cervix cancers was more frequent at advanced ages at death and in deaths at home or in small urban areas. Miscoding corpus cancers was more frequent in deaths at home or in small urban areas. From the statistical method, the estimated proportion of deaths from cervix cancer among all uterine cancer deaths was higher than 95% in women aged 30-40 years old but declined to 35% in women older than 70 years. The study clarifies the reason for poor encoding of uterus cancer mortality and refines the estimation of mortalities from cervix and corpus uteri cancers allowing future studies on the efficacy of cervical cancer screening.
    Cancer epidemiology. 11/2010; 35(3):243-9.
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to provide reference ranges for thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (fT(4)) based on data collected from a disease-free sample of French middle-aged adults. A total of 3218 subjects participating in the Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants (SU.VI.MAX) study had measurements for TSH, fT(4) and urinary iodine concentrations. Thyroid volume and structure were evaluated using standardized ultrasonography. We selected a disease-free sample which included 2338 subjects (1313 females aged 35-60 years and 1025 males aged 45-60 years) with normal thyroid imaging, no previously reported thyroid disease or use of thyroid medication, and no risk factors for thyroid dysfunction. Distribution of TSH and fT(4) was estimated in males and females. The median (central 95% range) TSH serum concentrations for females were 1.79 mU/L (0.29-5.21 mU/L) for ages 35-44 years and 1.98 mU/L (0.27-6.94 mU/L) for ages 45-60 years (p<0.0001, for age). The median (central 95% range) for males 45-60-year-old was 1.63 mU/L (0.28-4.54 mU/L) (p<0.0001, for sex). Sex- and age-specific mean fT(4) concentrations did not differ significantly (p=0.06) between males and females and (p=0.08) between female age groups. However, median fT(4) concentrations between 45-60-year-old males and females differed (p<0.001). In middle-aged adults, the TSH distribution was associated with gender and, among females, with age. Stratification according to gender and age should be considered when TSH ranges are used in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of thyroid disease. Clin Chem Lab Med 2009;47:1497-505.
    Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine 11/2009; 47(12):1497-505. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to describe the trend in the incidence of breast cancer in women under 40 in France for the period 1983-2002 and compare it with the trend observed in other age groups. Data from seven cancer registries were analysed. Annual percentage changes were estimated in different age groups using Poisson regression. During the period 1983-2002, breast cancer incidence in women under 40 increased regularly, with an estimated annual percentage change of 0.65 (95% CI: 0.03-1.26). In women aged over 40, the increase is more significant, particularly among women aged 50-74 (2.93% per year). The increase in breast cancer incidence in women under 40 was low and steady over the 20-year period considered. Even though young women did not experience such a major change in diagnostic practices as the development of screening among women aged 50-74, it is difficult to distinguish the effects of possible changes in risk factors and in diagnostic practices in the slight increase observed.
    The Breast 07/2008; 17(3):289-92. · 2.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to provide updated estimates of national trends in cancer incidence and mortality for France for 1980-2005. Twenty-five cancer sites were analysed. Incidence data over the 1975-2003 period were collected from 17 registries working at the department level, covering 16% of the French population. Mortality data for 1975-2004 were provided by the Inserm. National incidence estimates were based on the use of mortality as a correlate of incidence, mortality being available at both department and national levels. Observed incidence and mortality data were modelled using an age-cohort approach, including an interaction term. Short-term predictions from that model gave estimates of new cancer cases and cancer deaths in 2005 for France. The number of new cancer cases in 2005 was approximately 320,000. This corresponds to an 89% increase since 1980. Demographic changes were responsible for almost half of that increase. The remainder was largely explained by increases in prostate cancer incidence in men and breast cancer incidence in women. The relative increase in the world age-standardised incidence rate was 39%. The number of deaths from cancer increased from 130,000 to 146,000. This 13% increase was much lower than anticipated on the basis of demographic changes (37%). The relative decrease in the age-standardised mortality rate was 22%. This decrease was steeper over the 2000-2005 period in both men and women. Alcohol-related cancer incidence and mortality continued to decrease in men. The increasing trend of lung cancer incidence and mortality among women continued; this cancer was the second cause of cancer death among women. Breast cancer incidence increased regularly, whereas mortality has decreased slowly since the end of the 1990s. This study confirmed the divergence of cancer incidence and mortality trends in France over the 1980-2005 period. This divergence can be explained by the combined effects of a decrease in the incidence of the most aggressive cancers and an increase in the incidence of less aggressive cancers, partly due to changes in medical practices leading to earlier diagnoses.
    Revue d Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique 07/2008; 56(3):159-75. · 0.69 Impact Factor
  • Revue D Epidemiologie Et De Sante Publique - REV EPIDEMIOL SANTE PUBL. 01/2006; 54:81-81.
  • D Eilstein, Z Uhry, L Cherie-Challine, H Isnard
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    ABSTRACT: With 4,500 deaths in year 2000, female lung cancer mortality rates increased by 3% every year over the last two decades in France. This trend, not observed among males, is attributed to the regular increase of female smoking. In order to answer French Health decider's concerns, we estimated the future female lung cancer mortality rates and numbers of deaths for the next fifteen years, in France and its regions. Analyses were based on numbers of female deaths from lung cancer observed between 1975 and 1999, and on past and future population estimates for 1975-2014, at national and regional levels. Mortality rates and numbers of deaths in France and its regions by 5-year periods and 5-year age groups were given in the 1975-1999 death certificate data base, and were projected for 2000-2014. The analysis used a bayesian approach of the age-cohort model with auto-regressive constraints on parameters. Estimated mortality rates were standardized on truncated 20-85 + world population. French female lung cancer mortality increased by 3% every year between 1975 and 1999. In period 1995-1999, truncated 20-85 + mortality rates, and number of deaths per year were respectively 11.4 per 100,000 and 4,000. Mortality rates increased in all regions but variations were maximum in Corsica (+ 314%) and minimum in Auvergne (+ 37%). For the whole of France, the estimated truncated 20-85 + standardized rate, was respectively, 14.1 and 22.5 per 100,000 in period 2000-04 and period 2010-14, which represents a 60% increase between these two time periods. At the regional level, the maximum variation was found in Languedoc-Roussillon (107%), the minimum in Nord-Pas-de-Calais (40%). The bayesian approach of the age-cohort model is increasingly used because it produces stable projections, without having to include other cancer parameters. Nevertheless, it would be interesting to extend this model by incorporating a tobacco consumption component, in order to assess scenarios based on consumption decreases.
    Revue d Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique 05/2005; 53(2):167-81. · 0.69 Impact Factor
  • L Chérié-Challine
    La Revue du praticien 02/2005; 55(2):121-2.
  • D. Eilstein, Z. Uhry, L. Cherie-Challine, H. Isnard
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    ABSTRACT: Position du problèmeLa mortalité féminine par cancer du poumon en France a augmenté de 3 % par an ces vingt dernières années et a atteint 4 500 décès en 2000. Cette augmentation, non retrouvée chez l’homme, est attribuée au développement du tabagisme féminin. Pour répondre aux préoccupations des acteurs de santé, il a paru nécessaire d’estimer, pour ce cancer, les taux de mortalité et le nombre de décès féminins attendus dans les quinze prochaines années en France métropolitaine et dans chacune de ses régions.MéthodesL’analyse a porté sur les nombres de décès féminins par cancer du poumon de 1975 à 1999 et sur les effectifs de population passés et futurs estimés de 1975 à 2014, à l’échelle nationale et régionale. Les décès et les taux de mortalité pour 1975-1999 ont été calculés par périodes et par tranches d’âges quinquennales et projetés pour la période 2000-2014, pour chacune des régions et pour la France métropolitaine. L’analyse utilise l’approche bayésienne d’un modèle âge-cohorte auquel sont imposées des contraintes auto-régressives.RésultatsEn France métropolitaine, la mortalité féminine par cancer du poumon a augmenté de 3 % par an entre 1975 à 1999. Durant 1995-99, le taux standardisé sur la population mondiale tronquée 20-85 + et le nombre de décès annuel moyen étaient, respectivement, de 11,4 pour 100 000 et de 4 000. Le taux a augmenté dans toutes les régions, mais la variation la plus forte était observée en Corse (+ 314 %), la plus faible en Auvergne (+ 37 %). Pour la France métropolitaine, le taux standardisé tronqué devrait atteindre respectivement 14,1 et 22,5 pour 100 000 en 2000-2004 et 2010-2014, soit un accroissement de 60 % entre ces deux périodes. Au niveau régional, la variation la plus forte devrait être retrouvée dans le Languedoc-Roussillon (107 %), la plus faible dans le Nord-Pas-de-Calais (40 %).ConclusionsL’approche bayésienne du modèle âge-cohorte est utilisée de plus en plus fréquemment car elle permet d’assurer la stabilité des projections des taux et de s’affranchir de l’analyse des facteurs étiologiques du cancer. Il serait, pourtant, intéressant de compléter ce modèle par une composante tenant compte du tabagisme, permettant de construire des scénarios basés sur la baisse de la consommation.Background With 4,500 deaths in year 2000, female lung cancer mortality rates increased by 3% every year over the last two decades in France. This trend, not observed among males, is attributed to the regular increase of female smoking. In order to answer French Health decider's concerns, we estimated the future female lung cancer mortality rates and numbers of deaths for the next fifteen years, in France and its regions.Methods Analyses were based on numbers of female deaths from lung cancer observed between 1975 and 1999, and on past and future population estimates for 1975-2014, at national and regional levels. Mortality rates and numbers of deaths in France and its regions by 5-year periods and 5-year age groups were given in the 1975-1999 death certificate data base, and were projected for 2000-2014. The analysis used a bayesian approach of the age-cohort model with auto-regressive constraints on parameters. Estimated mortality rates were standardized on truncated 20-85 + world population.ResultsFrench female lung cancer mortality increased by 3% every year between 1975 and 1999. In period 1995-1999, truncated 20-85 + mortality rates, and number of deaths per year were respectively 11.4 per 100,000 and 4,000. Mortality rates increased in all regions but variations were maximum in Corsica (+ 314 %) and minimum in Auvergne (+ 37 %). For the whole of France, the estimated truncated 20-85 + standardized rate, was respectively, 14.1 and 22.5 per 100,000 in period 2000-04 and period 2010-14, which represents a 60% increase between these two time periods. At the regional level, the maximum variation was found in Languedoc-Roussillon (107%), the minimum in Nord-Pas-de-Calais (40%).Conclusions The bayesian approach of the age-cohort model is increasingly used because it produces stable projections, without having to include other cancer parameters. Nevertheless, it would be interesting to extend this model by incorporating a tobacco consumption component, in order to assess scenarios based on consumption decreases.
    Revue d'Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique. 01/2005; 53(2):167-181.
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    ABSTRACT: Thyroid carcinomas are rare and represent 1% of malignant tumours. Women are more likely to have thyroid cancer, at a ratio of three to one. Thyroid cancer may occur in any age group, although it is most common after the age of 30, and its aggressiveness increases significantly in older patients. Most patients present with a thyroid nodule. Thyroid nodules are frequent but only 5% of them are malignant. Over the last two decades, the widespread of diagnostic tools (ultrasonography, cytology) and changes in the surgical and pathological management of thyroid diseases have led to the increase of thyroid cancer, especially papillary microcarcinomas. Thyroid cancer is more frequent in people who have a history of thyroid exposure to radiation during childhood. The diagnosis is based on the histopathological examination that remains difficult in some cases. The most frequent thyroid cancers (papillary and follicular) are cured in 80-90 % of the cases if treated appropriately. Anaplastic cancer is rare and has a very poor prognosis. The primary therapy for thyroid cancer is total or near total thyroidectomy. Lymph node dissection is not systematically undertaken. Radioiodine treatment is advised for high risk patients and needs high levels of TSH to be effective. Then, patients must remain on thyroid hormone therapy for the rest of their lives. Prognosis factors are well defined and prognosis is good in case of differentiated thyroid cancer. Distant metastases are observed in 10% of the patients, and lung and bones are the most common sites. Locoregional recurrences are observed in 7% of the cases. Prolonged follow-up is recommended, based on physical examination, serum thyroglobulin assessment with TSH stimulation (L-thyroxin off or use of human recombinant TSH), ultrasonography and post therapeutic whole body scan.
    EMC - Endocrinologie 01/2005; 2(1):1-38.
  • Laurence Leenhardt, Pascale Grosclaude, Laurence Chérié-Challine
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    ABSTRACT: Thyroid cancer (TC) incidence, in France, has dramatically increased over the last two decades. In order to try and account for this observation, the French Department of Health requested the Public Health Agency to coordinate a multidisciplinary Thyroid Cancer Committee (TCC). The TCC analysed the temporal incidence trend in France, evaluated the contribution of changes in diagnostic practices of thyroid diseases to the observed increase of TC, and set up guidelines to improve the national surveillance system of TC. The increased incidence of TC is real (8.1% and 6.2% per year in women and in men, respectively), mainly due to papillary type with an epidemic of microcarcinomas (43% of operated cancers, period 1998-2001) associated to the extensiveness of thyroidectomies. Multicentric studies showed a significant increase, from 1980 to 2000, in ultrasonographic (3 to 84.8%) and cytological procedures (8 to 36% of patients with thyroid nodules) as well as a significant association between the increase in TC prevalence among operated patients (12.5 to 37%) and the spread of fine needle aspiration. Epidemiological evidence does not favour any link with the Chernobyl accident. The TCC recommended a national registry dedicated to thyroid cancer of the youths ( <18 years old). For adults, in addition with the strengthening of the French regional registries, a continuous registration of incident cases through the National Hospital Discharge Survey that covers all the territories is proposed. Such system, matched with pathological data derived from a national standardized collection, will provide a relevant model for epidemiological surveys of TC.
    Thyroid 12/2004; 14(12):1056-60. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To analyse trends in diagnostic practices of thyroid diseases and to relate them to the increase in thyroid cancer incidence in France over time. From 1980 to 2000, a French retrospective multicentric (three endocrinology and three nuclear medicine centres) study of thyroid diseases was conducted on 20 consecutive unselected patients' records, sampled every 5 years in each centre. Characteristics of the population and diagnosis procedures (thyroid ultrasonography (US), radionuclide scan, cytology and hormonal measurements) were described over time. Changing trends in operated patients and in cancer prevalence were analysed as well as the impact of practices on cancer incidence. The study included 471 patients (82% female, mean age 46.7, range 9-84 years), referred for nodular thyroid diseases (66.7%) or thyroid dysfunctions (33.3%). A significant increase in US (3 to 84.8%) and cytological practices (4.5 to 23%), and a decrease (89.4 to 49.6%) in radionuclide scan procedures were observed over time. Although the proportion of patients undergoing surgery remained constant (24.8%), the prevalence of cancer increased among operated patients from 12.5 to 37% (P=0.006). In a Cox's proportional hazard model stratified on the clinical characteristics of patients, only the cytological practice, regardless of its results, was significantly associated with the occurrence of cancer: relative risk (RR)=4.4 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-16; P=0.04). From 1980 to 2000, a major evolution in clinical practices has led to the increase in thyroid cancer reported in France. Such changes in medical, as well as in surgical and pathological, practices must be taken into account in incidence measurement.
    European Journal of Endocrinology 03/2004; 150(2):133-9. · 3.14 Impact Factor
  • D. Eilstein, Z. Uhry, L. Cherie-Challine, H. Isnard, J. Bloch
    Revue D Epidemiologie Et De Sante Publique - REV EPIDEMIOL SANTE PUBL. 01/2004; 52:52-52.
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    ABSTRACT: From 1975 to 1995, the incidence of thyroid cancer in the French population increased by a factor of 5.2 in men and 2.7 in women, thereby raising public concerns about its association with the nuclear accident at Chernobyl. A study performed at the request of French health authorities sought to quantify the potential risk of thyroid cancer associated with the Chernobyl fallout in France in order to determine if this risk could be observed through an epidemiological approach. The study focused on the most exposed population: those living in eastern France and younger than 15 y at the time of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident (26 April 1986). The number of spontaneous thyroid cancers in this population was predicted from French cancer registry data, and the thyroid doses were estimated from all available data about contamination in France. Associated risks were calculated with different risk models, all based on a linear no-threshold dose-effect relationship. Under this hypothesis, from 1.3 to 22 excess thyroid cancer cases were predicted for the 1991-2000 period, compared with the 212 spontaneous cases (0.5 to 10.5%) predicted, and from 11.2 to 55.2 excess cases were predicted for 1991-2015, compared with the 1,342 spontaneous cases (0.8 to 4.1%) predicted. These risk calculations indicate that the Chernobyl fallout cannot explain the entire increase in thyroid cancers in France, and that it is improbable that an epidemiological study could demonstrate such an excess. The surveillance of thyroid cancers in France should be enhanced.
    Health Physics 10/2003; 85(3):323-9. · 1.02 Impact Factor
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