Regula E Halbeisen

ETH Zurich, Zürich, ZH, Switzerland

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Publications (6)41.07 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The mammalian Golgi apparatus consists of individual cisternae that are stacked in a polarized manner to form the compact zones of the Golgi. Several stacks are linked to form a ribbon via dynamic lateral bridges. The determinants required for maintaining the characteristic Golgi structure are incompletely understood. Here, we have characterized p28, a new gamma-subfamily member of p24 membrane proteins. p28 localized to endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) and cis Golgi and accumulated in the ERGIC upon Brefeldin A treatment, typical for a protein cycling in the early secretory pathway. p28 interacted with a subset of p24 proteins. Its depletion by small interfering RNA (siRNA) led to fragmentation of the Golgi without affecting the overall organization of microtubules but considerably reducing the amount of acetylated tubulin. The distribution of COPI and tethers, including GM130, was not affected. At the ultrastructural level, the Golgi fragments appeared as mini-stacks with apparently unchanged cis-trans topology. Golgi fragmentation did not impair anterograde or retrograde traffic. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that silencing p28 prevents protein exchange between Golgi stacks during reassembly after Brefeldin A-induced Golgi breakdown. These results show that the formation of a Golgi ribbon requires the structural membrane protein p28 in addition to previously identified SNAREs, coat proteins and tethers.
    Traffic 10/2009; 11(1):70-89. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While probing the role of RNA for the function of SET1C/COMPASS histone methyltransferase, we identified SET1RC (SET1 mRNA-associated complex), a complex that contains SET1 mRNA and Set1, Swd1, Spp1 and Shg1, four of the eight polypeptides that constitute SET1C. Characterization of SET1RC showed that SET1 mRNA binding did not require associated Swd1, Spp1 and Shg1 proteins or RNA recognition motifs present in Set1. RNA binding was not observed when Set1 protein and SET1 mRNA were derived from independent genes or when SET1 transcripts were restricted to the nucleus. Importantly, the protein-RNA interaction was sensitive to EDTA, to the translation elongation inhibitor puromycin and to the inhibition of translation initiation in prt1-1 mutants. Taken together, our results support the idea that SET1 mRNA binding was dependent on translation and that SET1RC assembled on nascent Set1 in a cotranslational manner. Moreover, we show that cellular accumulation of Set1 is limited by the availability of certain SET1C components, such as Swd1 and Swd3, and suggest that cotranslational protein interactions may exert an effect in the protection of nascent Set1 from degradation.
    The EMBO Journal 09/2009; 28(19):2959-70. · 9.82 Impact Factor
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    Regula E Halbeisen, André P Gerber
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    ABSTRACT: Cells rapidly alter gene expression in response to environmental stimuli such as nutrients, hormones, and drugs. During the imposed "remodeling" of gene expression, changes in the levels of particular mRNAs do not necessarily correlate with those of the encoded proteins, which could in part rely on the differential recruitment of mRNAs to translating ribosomes. To systematically address this issue, we have established an approach to rapidly access the translational status of each mRNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by affinity purification of endogenously formed ribosomes and the analysis of associated mRNAs with DNA microarrays. Using this method, we compared changes in total mRNA levels (transcriptome) with ribosome associations (translatome) after the application of different conditions of cellular stress. Severe stresses, induced by amino acid depletion or osmotic shock, stimulated highly correlated responses affecting about 15% of both total RNA levels and translatome. Many of the regulated messages code for functionally related proteins, thus reflecting logical responses to the particular stress. In contrast, mild stress provoked by addition of Calcofluor-white and menadione altered the translatome of approximately 1% of messages with only marginal effects on total mRNA, suggesting largely uncorrelated responses of transcriptome and translatome. Among these putative translationally regulated messages were most components of the mitochondrial ATPase. Increased polysome associations of corresponding messages and higher mitochondrial ATPase activities upon treatment confirmed the relevance for regulation of this macromolecular complex. Our results suggest the presence of highly sensitive translational regulatory networks that coordinate functionally related messages. These networks are preferentially activated for rapid adaptation of cells to minor environmental perturbations.
    PLoS Biology 06/2009; 7(5):e1000105. · 12.69 Impact Factor
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    Regula E. Halbeisen, Tanja Scherrer, André P. Gerber
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    ABSTRACT: We describe ribosome affinity purification (RAP), a method that allows rapid purification of ribosomes and associated messages from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method relies on the expression of protein A tagged versions of the ribosomal protein Rpl16, which is used to efficiently recover endogenously formed ribosomes and polysomes from cellular extracts with IgG-coupled spherical microbeads. This approach can be applied to profile reactions of the translatome, which refers to all messages associated with ribosomes, with those of the transcriptome using DNA microarrays. In addition, ribosomal proteins, their modifications, and/or other associated proteins can be mapped with mass spectrometry. Finally, application of this method in other organisms provides a valuable tool to decipher cell-type specific gene expression patterns.
    Methods 05/2009; 48:306-310. · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    R E Halbeisen, A Galgano, T Scherrer, A P Gerber
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    ABSTRACT: Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays important roles in diverse cellular processes such as development, metabolism and cancer progression. Whereas many classical studies explored the mechanistics and physiological impact on specific mRNA substrates, the recent development of genome-wide analysis tools enables the study of post-transcriptional gene regulation on a global scale. Importantly, these studies revealed distinct programs of RNA regulation, suggesting a complex and versatile post-transcriptional regulatory network. This network is controlled by specific RNA-binding proteins and/or non-coding RNAs, which bind to specific sequence or structural elements in the RNAs and thereby regulate subsets of mRNAs that partly encode functionally related proteins. It will be a future challenge to link the spectra of targets for RNA-binding proteins to post-transcriptional regulatory programs and to reveal its physiological implications.
    Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences CMLS 04/2008; 65(5):798-813. · 5.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cycling proteins play important roles in the organization and function of the early secretory pathway by participating in membrane traffic and selective transport of cargo between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the intermediate compartment (ERGIC), and the Golgi. To identify new cycling proteins, we have developed a novel procedure for the purification of ERGIC membranes from HepG2 cells treated with brefeldin A, a drug known to accumulate cycling proteins in the ERGIC. Membranes enriched 110-fold over the homogenate for ERGIC-53 were obtained and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Major proteins corresponded to established and putative cargo receptors and components mediating protein maturation and membrane traffic. Among the uncharacterized proteins, a 32-kDa protein termed ERGIC-32 is a novel cycling membrane protein with sequence homology to Erv41p and Erv46p, two proteins enriched in COPII vesicles of yeast. ERGIC-32 localizes to the ERGIC and partially colocalizes with the human homologs of Erv41p and Erv46p, which mainly localize to the cis-Golgi. ERGIC-32 interacts with human Erv46 (hErv46) as revealed by covalent cross-linking and mistargeting experiments, and silencing of ERGIC-32 by small interfering RNAs increases the turnover of hErv46. We propose that ERGIC-32 functions as a modulator of the hErv41-hErv46 complex by stabilizing hErv46. Our novel approach for the isolation of the ERGIC from BFA-treated cells may ultimately lead to the identification of all proteins rapidly cycling early in the secretory pathway.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/2004; 279(45):47242-53. · 4.65 Impact Factor