János Aradi

University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hajdu-Bihar, Hungary

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Publications (31)96.65 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As an outcome of The 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, a connection has been highlighted between the length of telomeres and epigenetic effects, such as intensive changes in lifestyle and nutrition as well as behavioural and psychological factors. In this review, the various elements of molecular, cell biological, nutritional and lifestyle changes are introduced and discussed.
    Cell Biology International 11/2011; 35(11):1079-83. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously reported the in vitro anti-proliferative effect of 4-thio-uridylate (s(4)UMP) on OCM-1 uveal melanoma cells. Here, we assessed the efficacy of s(4)UMP on JY cells. Treatment of JY cells with s(4)UMP suppressed their colony forming activity and induced apoptosis; healthy human bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells were 14-fold less sensitive to the nucleotide. In vivo effectiveness of s(4)UMP was determined using xenograft SCID mouse model. s(4)UMP decreased the cell number and colony forming activity of the total cell content of the femur of SCID mice transplanted with JY cells without affecting the bone marrow of healthy mice. These results suggest that s(4)UMP alone or in combination with other clinically approved anti-leukemic remedies should be further explored as a potential novel therapeutic agent.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 06/2011; 410(3):682-7. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine was awarded to three scientists for their pioneer research on telomeres - and the enzyme that forms them - telomerase. Their work highlighted the considerable connection between the length of telomeres and intensive changes in lifestyle and nutrition (Ornish method) as well as behavioral and psychological factors. In this review the various elements of molecular, cell biological, nutritional and lifestyle changes are introduced and discussed.
    Orvosi Hetilap 06/2010; 151(24):965-70.
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    ABSTRACT: The expression of hTERT gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of telomerase, is a feature of most cancer cells. Changes in the chromatin environment of its promoter and binding of transcriptional factors have been reported in differentiating cells when its transcription is repressed. However, it is not clear whether these changes are directly involved in this repression or only linked to differentiation. In a maturation-resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line (NB4-LR1), we have previously identified a new pathway of retinoid-induced hTERT repression independent of differentiation. Using a variant of this cell line (NB4-LR1(SFD)), which resists to this repression, we show that although distinct patterns of histone modifications and transcription factor binding at the proximal domain of hTERT gene promoter could concur to modulate its expression, this region is not sufficient to the on/off switch of hTERT by retinoids. DNA methylation analysis of the hTERT promoter led to the identification of two distinct functional domains, a proximal one, fully unmethylated in both cell lines, and a distal one, significantly methylated in NB4-LR1(SFD) cells, whose methylation was further re-enforced by retinoid treatment. Interestingly, we showed that the binding to this distal domain of a known hTERT repressor, WT1, was defective only in NB4-LR1(SFD) cells. We propose that epigenetic modifications targeting this distal region could modulate the binding of hTERT repressors and account either for hTERT reactivation and resistance to retinoid-induced hTERT downregulation.
    Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K 03/2010; 24(3):613-22. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this short communication, it is shown that 4-thio-uridylate (s(4)UMP, designated as UD29) inhibits glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), suggesting that the enol-form of the thiolated nucleotide may interfere with the function of the essential -SH group in the active center of the enzyme. Since HIV entry requires thiol/disulfide exchange processes, this activity prompted us to study the anti-HIV activity of the nucleotide. Indeed, UD29 inhibited the replication of HIV-1(IIIB) in the MT-4 cell line and HIV-1(Ada-M) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Furthermore, UD29 was not toxic in PBMCs in vitro or in mice when the compound was administered intravenously.
    Pharmacological reports: PR 03/2009; 61(2):343-7. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The consensus thrombin aptamer C15-mer is a single-stranded DNA of 15 nucleotides [d(GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG)] that was identified by the selection of thrombin-binding molecules from a large combinatorial library of oligonucleotides. It is capable of inhibiting thrombin at nanomolar concentrations through binding to a specific region within thrombin exosite 1. As has been shown in our earlier studies, the 4-thio-deoxyuridylate (s4dU)-containing oligonucleotides have high affinity for a number of proteins, due to the reduced hydrophilic character of the modified oligonucleotide. Three different analogs of the original thrombin-inhibiting sequence, in which some of the thymidylate residues were replaced by 4-thio-deoxyuridylates, were synthesized. The inhibitory effect of modified aptamers was tested on thrombin-catalyzed fibrin clot formation and fibrinopeptide A release from fibrinogen, thrombin-induced platelet aggregation/secretion, and the formation of thrombus on coverslips coated with human collagen type III, thrombin-treated fibrinogen or subendothelial matrix of human microvascular endothelial cells. As compared with the C15-mer, the analog with the sequence GG(s4dU)TGG(s4dU)G(s4dU)GGT(s4dU)GG (UC15-mer) showed a 2-fold increased inhibition of thrombin-catalyzed fibrin clot formation, fibrinopeptide A release, platelet aggregation and secretion in human plasma and thrombus formation on thrombin-treated fibrinogen surfaces under flow conditions. Concerning the inhibition of thrombin-induced fibrin formation from purified fibrinogen and activation of washed platelets, UC15-mer was 3-fold and twelve-fold more effective than C15-mer, respectively. The replacement of four thymidylate residues in C15-mer by 4-thio-deoxyuridylate resulted in a new thrombin aptamer with increased anticoagulant and antithrombotic properties.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 08/2008; 6(10):1764-71. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An 18-mer phosphorothioate bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibited colony formation of three B-cell leukemia/lymphoma cell lines in a dose dependent manner in the range of 0.125-0.5 micromol/l. The scrambled cogener had no detectable effect. A decrease in BCL-2 protein and apoptotic DNA fragmentation was detected in the studied cell lines and primary blast cells of two children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Neither BCL-2 protein level, nor DNA integrity was affected by the scrambled control indicating the specific effect ASO. As far as we know, this is the first report on the effects of bcl-2 ASO on childhood leukemia/lymphoma cell samples.
    Pathology & Oncology Research 07/2008; 14(3):275-9. · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    I Tárkányi, J Aradi
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    ABSTRACT: Telomerase enzyme is a ribonucleoprotein maintaining the length of the telomeres by adding G-rich repeats to the end of the eukaryotic chromosomes. Normal human somatic cells, cultured in vitro, have a strictly limited proliferative potential undergoing senescence after about 50-70 population doublings. In contrast, most of the tumor cells have unlimited replicative potential. Although the mechanisms of immortalization are not understood completely at a genetic level, the key role of the telomere/telomerase system in the process is clear. The DNA replication machinery is not able to replicate fully the DNA at the very end of the chromosomes; therefore, about 50-200 nucleotides are lost during each of the replication cycles resulting in a gradual decrease of telomere length. Critically short telomere induces senescence, subsequent crisis and cell death. In tumor cells, however, the telomerase enzyme prevents the formation of critically short telomeres, adding GGTTAG repeats to the 3' end of the chromosomes immortalizing the cells. Immortality is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Besides the catalytic activity dependent telomere maintenance, catalytic activity-independent effects of telomerase may also be involved in the regulation of cell cycle. The telomere/telomerase system offers two possibilities to intervene the proliferative activity of the cell: (1) inhibition the telomere maintenance by inhibiting the telomerase activity; (2) activating the residual telomerase enzyme or inducing telomerase expression. Whilst the former approach could abolish the limitless replicative potential of malignant cells, the activation of telomerase might be utilized for treating degenerative diseases. Here, we review the current status of telomerase therapeutics, summarizing the activities of those pharmacological agents which either inhibit or activate the enzyme. We also discuss the future opportunities and challenges of research on pharmacological intervention of telomerase activity.
    Biochimie 02/2008; 90(1):156-72. · 3.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The formation of supramolecular polymeric aggregates with a molecular mass of 100 kDa in a nonaqueous solution from a telechelic dimer of isopropylidene guanosine in the presence of K(+) ions is reported. The possible structure of macromonomers resulting from the development of G4 quartets was deduced from DOSY NMR, circular dichroism spectra, and dynamic light scattering measurements.
    Langmuir 05/2007; 23(10):5283-5. · 4.38 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences - EUR J PHARM SCI. 01/2007; 32(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Suligovir is a 35-mer homo-oligonucleotide, containing exclusively 4-thio deoxyuridylate, proved to be a potent inhibitor of HIV entry. In this paper, we described the effect of extent of thiolation and the introduction of nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate linkages on the anti-HIV activity of Suligovir. We found that the decreased thiolated nucleotide content decreases the anti-HIV potency of the compound and the introduction of phosphorothioate linkages does not improve its antiviral activity.
    Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 11/2006; 16(20):5321-3. · 2.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The involvement of telomerase in cellular immortalization and senescence has often been assessed by means of telomerase expression at the RNA level and quantification of telomerase activity by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. However, these methods either neglected the existence of various telomerase splice variants, or ignored the nonconventional functions of telomerase independent of its ability to elongate and maintain telomere length. Immunodetection of telomerase is now being recognized as a necessary approach to precisely elucidate its roles in oncogenesis and senescence. A few antibodies directed against the catalytic subunit of the human telomerase (hTERT) are currently used but their specificity is not always demonstrated. A survey of the literature showed inconsistencies and led us to comparatively re-evaluate the most frequently used antibodies. Surprisingly, mass spectrometry, two-dimensional gel analysis and immunofluorescent experiments revealed that the most frequently used hTERT immunoprobe, a mouse monoclonal antibody that was claimed to be directed against an hTERT protein epitope, in fact recognizes nucleolin rather than telomerase. Our findings have interesting implications regarding the biology of nucleolin and telomerase in the context of pathophysiological investigations recently carried out.
    Journal of Cell Science 08/2006; 119(Pt 13):2797-806. · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The benzophenanthridine alkaloids sanguinarine, chelerythrine and chelidonine were reported previously to provoke cell death in a variety of tumor cells suggesting their potential application as anticancer agents. Here we tested their effects on a primary human uveal melanoma cell line, OCM-1. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V binding/PI exclusion and DNA fragmentation disclosed that all these alkaloids could induce apoptosis in OCM-1 cells. Moreover, necrotic cell death was also observed upon alkaloid treatment. As it was also evidenced by light microscopic inspection of cellular morphology, chelidonine primarily caused apoptosis, while sanguinarine and chelerythrine were effective via a so-termed bimodal cell death (apoptosis and primary necrosis). The relative efficiencies of the two modes depended on the applied dose. This study is the first implication for the possible use of these alkaloids in the therapy of uveal melanomas, for which no really efficient therapeutic regimen is available so far.
    Cancer Letters 07/2006; 237(1):67-75. · 5.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Deoxy-ATP is a potent inducer of apoptosis. We intended to synthesize a lipophilic dAMP derivative which, according to our working hypothesis penetrates into the cell, is converted to dAMP by intracellular esterases and to dATP by nucleotide kinases. We synthesized dAMP-di-n-butylester (DAB) and tested it. We found that it fulfills the above-described expectations. DAB treatment decreases the viability of HL-60 cells, increases the dATP concentration and induces apoptogenic cytochrome c release from mitochondria with concomitant elevation of caspase-9 activity. Our results indicate that use of dAMP derivatives with masked phosphate may be a feasible approach for pharmacological elevation of intracellular dATP and induction of apoptosis.
    Cancer Letters 05/2006; 235(2):281-90. · 5.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Telomeres are located at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Human telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase, is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and extension of telomeric DNA. It is composed of at least, a template RNA component (hTR; human Telomerase RNA) and a catalytic subunit, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The absence of telomerase is associated with telomere shortening and aging of somatic cells, while high telomerase activity is observed in over 85% of human cancer cells, strongly indicating its key role during tumorigenesis. Several details regarding telomere structure and telomerase regulation have already been elucidated, providing new targets for therapeutic exploitation. Further support for anti-telomerase approaches comes from recent studies indicating that telomerase is endowed of additional functions in the control of growth and survival of tumor cells that do not depend only on the ability of this enzyme to maintain telomere length. This observation suggests that inhibiting telomerase or its synthesis may have additional anti-proliferative and apoptosis inducing effect, independently of the reduction of telomere length during cell divisions. This article reviews the basic information about the biology of telomeres and telomerase and attempts to present various approaches that are currently under investigation to inhibit its expression and its activity. We summarize herein distinct anti-telomerase approaches like antisense strategies, reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and G-quadruplex interacting agents, and also review molecules targeting hTERT expression, such as retinoids and evaluate them for their therapeutic potential. "They conceive a certain theory, and everything has to fit into that theory. If one little fact will not fit it, they throw it aside. But it is always the facts that will not fit in that are significant". "Death on the Nile". Agatha Christie.
    Current Cancer Drug Targets 04/2006; 6(2):147-80. · 4.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Brachytherapy is a well-established, effective treatment for uveal melanoma with a failure rate of 15%. The fatal consequence of unsuccessful treatments offers reason for improvement of the method. The authors propose using an apoptosis inducing agent locally, concomitantly with the well-established therapy, to sensitize the tumor cells. The authors propose a new nontoxic moderately active apoptosis inducing agent, 4-thio-uridylate (s4UMP), for this purpose. OCM-1 uveal melanoma cells were treated with various concentrations of s4UMP and its effect was monitored by measuring the cell viability (MTT assay). The following apoptosis detecting methods were performed to reveal the mechanism of decreased cell viability: light microscopy, DNA fragmentation assay, determination of caspase 9 activity, and FACS analysis. The viability of uveal melanoma cells was decreased by 32%, 40%, and 9% after 24, 48, and 72 hours of treatment with 10 microg/mL (30 microM) s4UMP. The effect was not dose dependent; it rather followed a saturation-type inhibition and the cells at lower drug concentration recovered after 72 hours. Characteristic apoptotic cell morphology and DNA fragmentation was detected in treated cells. The caspase-9 was activated upon treatment showing maximal activity at 48 hours suggesting the induction of apoptosis. The annexin binding activity further verified the apoptogenic activity of s4UMP. Uveal melanoma, more than other solid tumors, is resistant to most of the chemotherapeutic protocols as indicated by the high mortality rate of metastatic disease. The authors showed that s4UMP, a naturally occurring nucleotide, could induce apoptosis in uveal melanoma cells, suggesting a potential supplementary therapeutic application of the compound.
    European journal of ophthalmology 01/2006; 16(5):680-5. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is efficiently treated with a cell differentiation inducer, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, a significant percentage of patients still develop resistance to this treatment. Recently, arsenic trioxide (As2O3), alone or in combination with ATRA, has been identified as an alternative therapy in patients with both ATRA-sensitive and ATRA-resistant APL. Previous investigations restricted the mechanism of this synergism to the modulation and/or degradation of PML-RARalpha oncoprotein through distinct pathways. In this study, using several ATRA maturation-resistant APL cell lines, we demonstrate in vitro that the success of ATRA/As2O3 treatment in APL pathology can be explained, at least in part, by a synergistic effect of these two drugs in triggering downregulation of telomerase efficient enough to cause telomere shortening and subsequent cell death. Such long-term low-dose combinatorial therapy strategies, developed also to avoid acute side effects, reinforce the notion that the antitelomerase strategy, based on a combination of active agents, should now be considered and evaluated not only in APL but also in other malignancies.
    Leukemia 11/2005; 19(10):1806-11. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously reported the potent in vitro HIV-1 anti-reverse transcriptase activity of a 35-mer of 4-thio-deoxyuridylate [(s(4)dU)(35)]. In efforts to define its activity in a more physiological system, studies were carried out to determine the stage of viral infection that this compound mediates its anti-viral effect. Results of the studies reported herein show that (s(4)dU)(35) is nontoxic and is capable of inhibiting both single and multi-drug resistant HIV strains (IC(50): 0.8-25.4 microg/ml) in vitro. Besides its previously reported anti-RT activity, (s(4)dU)(35) mediated its antiviral action by preventing virus attachment (IC(50): 0.002-0.003 microg/ml), and was stable in vitro and slowly degraded by DNAses. Competition studies and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments indicated that (s(4)dU)(35) preferentially binds to CD4 receptors, but not to CD48. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies showed that (s(4)dU)(35) did not penetrate into the cells and colocalized with cell surface thioredoxin. Our studies identify (s(4)dU)(35) as a potential novel HIV entry inhibitor that may have utility as either a systemic antiretroviral or as a preventing agent for HIV transmission.
    Virology 05/2005; 334(2):214-23. · 3.37 Impact Factor
  • András Horváth, Janos Aradi
    Analytical Biochemistry 04/2005; 338(2):341-3. · 2.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most tumor cells attain their immortality by reactivating telomerase. We report here the telomerase inhibitory potential of chimeric oligonucleotides composed of a 13mer antisense sequence targeting the telomerase RNA template region and a (s4dU)n moiety at its 3' or 5'-end. The increase of the thiolated chain length enhances the telomerase inhibitory potential, but decreases specificity, indicated by HIV reverse transcriptase inhibition. Chimeras with 5' (s4dU)(n)s were more potent inhibitors than the antisense alone or the 3' modified ones. Cy5-labeled (s4dU)4AS and (s4dU)8AS proved the internalization of the oligonucleotides, raising the possibility to be tested as cellular anti-telomerase agents.
    FEBS Letters 03/2005; 579(6):1411-6. · 3.58 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

295 Citations
96.65 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2011
    • University of Debrecen
      • • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      • • Department of Medical Microbiology
      • • Department of Ophthalmology
      Debrecen, Hajdu-Bihar, Hungary
  • 2010
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
  • 2004
    • University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
      Buffalo, New York, United States