Yeesoon Sukseri

King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand

Are you Yeesoon Sukseri?

Claim your profile

Publications (3)0 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Stem cell transplantation is a potential treatment to improve left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) after ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However, the outcomes still are controversial. To determine the 6-month LVEF of the patients who underwent intra-coronary bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMC) transplantation in patients with STEMI compared with controlled subjects. After successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in STEMI patients who had LVEF was less than 50% were randomized to intra-coronary BMC transplantation or control. Bone marrow aspiration of 100 cc was performed in the morning. After cellprocessing for three hours, the suspension of BMC about 10 cc were infused to infracted area using standard PCI technique. Balloon occlusion for three minutes was performed during cell infusion. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine LVEF scar volume and LV volume before and six-month follow-up. Between September 2006 and July 2008, 23patients (11 in BMC group and 12 in control group) were enrolled. Mean BMC count before transplant was 420 x 10(6) cell with 96% viability. At six-month follow-up, New York Heart Association function class significantly improved in both groups (2.3 +/- 0.6 to 1.2 +/- 0. 4 for BMC and 2.3 +/- 0.7 to 1.3 +/- 0.5 for control group) but no difference was seen between groups. However, scar volume, wall motion score index, and LVEF did not show improvement after six months in both groups (33.7 +/- 7.7 to 33.5 +/- 7.6 for BMC and 31.1 +/- 7.1 to 32.6 +/- 8.3 for control group). No complication was observed during the procedure. BMC transplantation intra-coronary in patients with STEMI in KCMH was feasible and safe but LVEF improvement could not be demonstrated.
    Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet 06/2011; 94(6):657-63.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Stem cell transplantation is a potential treatment to improve left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) after ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However technique and mode of transplantation, type of cells, number of cells, and when to transplant are still unknown. To determine the feasibility and safety of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMC) intra-coronary transplantation and 6-months results in patients with STEMI. After successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in STEMI patients who did not have flow re-established within 12 hours and poor LVEF (less than 50%) by echocardiography were enrolled Bone marrow aspiration of 100 cc was performed in the morning. After cell processing for 3 hours, the suspension of BMC about 10 cc were infused to infarcted area using standard PCI technique. Balloon occlusion for 3 minutes was performed during cell infusion. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine LVEF scar volume and LV volume before and 6 months after transplantation. Five patients were enrolled between May and August 2006. Duration of STEMI before transplantation ranged from 18 days to 14 years. Total amount of BMC ranged from 67 x 10(6) to 335 x 10(6). Number of CD 34 and CD 133+ cells were approximation to be 0.7 x 10(6) to 7.7 x 10(6) and 0.01 x 10(6) to 3.04 x 10(6). LVEF was increased from 36.4 at baseline to 43.3 at 6-month. NT pro-BNP level was decreased from 1105 ng/ml at baseline to 288 pg/ml at 6-month. No complications such as chest pain, no re-flow phenomenon, ventricular arrhythmia, or hypotension was detected during the procedure. Intra-coronary BMC transplantation in patients with STEMI in our center is feasible and safe. LVEF was slightly improved; however, a randomized controlled study is needed.
    Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet 12/2009; 92(12):1591-6.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Stroke is currently a leading cause of physical disability and carries a high mortality rate. About 20% of ischemic stroke is caused by carotid artery stenosis. Carotid stenting is now another therapeutic modality for the treatment of extracranial carotid artery stenosis. All patients who underwent carotid stenting at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital from March 2001 to December 2002 were analyzed. The case success was determined by residual angiographic stenosis of less than 30% without any major adverse cardiovascular events such as death, stroke or emergency re-intervention. Carotid stenting was performed in 6 patients with 9 vessels disease. Their mean age was 71.8 years. Hypertension was the most common risk factor detected in all patients, followed by smoking (83.3%), dyslipidemia (83.3%) and diabetes (33.3%). One third of the patients had a prior history of stroke or transient ischemic attack and 16.6% occurred within 6 months. Five of six (83.3%) had severe coronary disease and required coronary artery bypass grafting after successful carotid stenting. The procedures were successful in all patients. The average percent of stenosis was reduced from 83.2% to 9.4%. The distal protection device was used in one-third of the cases. The average procedure time was 63.6 minutes and fluoroscopic time was 16.6 minutes. There was no evidence of stroke or death after the procedures. Only one (11.1%) developed hypotension and bradycardia that required intravenous fluid loading and inotropic support for 24 hours. Carotid stenting at our center is feasible and considered to be a safe procedure for the treatment of carotid artery stenosis. This procedure is another alternative treatment and may be superior to carotid endarterectomy, the standard treatment of carotid artery stenosis.
    Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet 09/2004; 87(8):917-20.