Manfred Biebl

State Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moskva, Moscow, Russia

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Publications (5)5.8 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A new Salmonella enterica phage, Det7, was isolated from sewage and shown by electron microscopy to belong to the Myoviridae morphogroup of bacteriophages. Det7 contains a 75-kDa protein with 50% overall sequence identity to the tail spike endorhamnosidase of podovirus P22. Adsorption of myoviruses to their bacterial hosts is normally mediated by long and short tail fibers attached to a contractile tail, whereas podoviruses do not contain fibers but attach to host cells through stubby tail spikes attached to a very short, noncontractile tail. The amino-terminal 150 residues of the Det7 protein lack homology to the P22 tail spike and are probably responsible for binding to the base plate of the myoviral tail. Det7 tail spike lacking this putative particle-binding domain was purified from Escherichia coli, and well-diffracting crystals of the protein were obtained. The structure, determined by molecular replacement and refined at a 1.6-A resolution, is very similar to that of bacteriophage P22 tail spike. Fluorescence titrations with an octasaccharide suggest Det7 tail spike to bind its receptor lipopolysaccharide somewhat less tightly than the P22 tail spike. The Det7 tail spike is even more resistant to thermal unfolding than the already exceptionally stable homologue from P22. Folding and assembly of both trimeric proteins are equally temperature sensitive and equally slow. Despite the close structural, biochemical, and sequence similarities between both proteins, the Det7 tail spike lacks both carboxy-terminal cysteines previously proposed to form a transient disulfide during P22 tail spike assembly. Our data suggest receptor-binding module exchange between podoviruses and myoviruses in the course of bacteriophage evolution.
    Journal of Virology 04/2008; 82(5):2265-73. DOI:10.1128/JVI.01641-07 · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Jan W. Kretzer · Manfred Biebl · Stefan Miller
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    ABSTRACT: Rapid microbial testing is more and more preferred worldwide. Conventional time-consuming methods with detection times taking up to several days are being replaced by rapid tests that take only a few hours. With the development of new, rapid, and accurate methods for the detection of bacterial contaminants, the requirements for sample preparation techniques are more and more challenging. In fact, sample preparation is the critical step with respect to the applicability of novel methods. Sample preparation comprises sampling/sample drawing, sample handling, and sample preparation. To fulfil the demands of modern microbiology the ideal procedure should permit rapidly providing the processed sample in a small volume which contains the analyte in the highest concentration possible. The analyte has to be free of substances interfering with the detection method to be finally applied. Additionally, sample processing procedures used should not result in any loss of the bacterial analyte, thereby enabling quantitative measurements. Techniques for the preparation of samples subjected to microbiological examination are described, especially focusing on the methods applied to investigate the occurrence of pathogenic organisms in foods as well as in the food processing environment. Sample drawing methods for the monitoring of air and surfaces are outlined. Moreover, different sample preparation methods intended to be carried out prior to the detection of intact bacterial cells or bacterial nucleic acids are discussed in detail. Special attention is paid to magnetic particle-based separation methods, as these tools have gained increasing importance due to their outstanding advantages.
    12/2007: pages 15-30;
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    ABSTRACT: A study was made of several bacteriophages (including phages U2 and LB related to T-even phages of Escherichia coli) that grow both on E. coli K12 and on some Salmonella strains. Such phages were termed ambivalent. T-even ambivalent phages (U2 and LB) are rare and have a limited number of hosts among Salmonella strains. U2 and LB are similar to canonical E. coli-specific T-even phages in morphological type and size of the phage particle and in reaction with specific anti-T4 serum. Phages U2 and LB have identical sets of structural proteins, some of which are similar in size to structural proteins of phages T2 and T4. DNA restriction patterns of phages U2 and LB differ from each other and from those of T2 and T4. Still, DNAs of all four phages have considerable homology. Unexpectedly, phages U2 and LB grown on Salmonella bungori were unstable during centrifugation in a CsCl gradient. Ambivalent bacteriophages were found in species other than T-even phages and were similar in morphotype to lambdoid and other E. coli phages. One of the ambivalent phages was highly similar to well-known Felix01, which is specific for Salmonella. Ambivalent phages can be used to develop a new set for phage typing in Salmonella. An obvious advantage is that ambivalent phages can be reproduced in the E. coli K12 laboratory strain, which does not produce active temperate phages. Consequently, the resulting typing phage preparation is devoid of an admixture of temperate phages, which are common in Salmonella. The presence of temperate phages in phage-typing preparations may cause false-positive results in identifying specific Salmonella strains isolated from the environment or salmonellosis patients. Ambivalent phages are potentially useful for phage therapy and prevention of salmonellosis in humans and animals.
    Genetika 03/2006; 42(2):159-68. DOI:10.1134/S1022795406020025 · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study the genome diversity of bacteriophages from geographically distant natural populations, new giant phi KZ-like Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages isolated in two different regions were compared with earlier known phages of three species (phi KZ, Lin68, EL). A broad spectrum of lytic activity was demonstrated for all phi KZ-like phages. Phages of the phi KZ species proved to be common in natural populations of various regions, while IL- and Lin68-related phages were extremely rare. Most phi KZ-related phages had unique DNA restriction patterns, but the differences between these were only minor, and the genomes did not contain nonhomologous fragments. The spectrum of capsid polypeptides proved to be conserved in each species, and was proposed as a character necessary and sufficient for express classification of phages with an accuracy of species. Phages isolated in different geographical regions showed no substantial difference. Some phages only slightly differing in DNA restriction pattern from phi KZ may be used to study the origin of phi KZ genes coding for orthologs of proteins of unrelated species (other phages, pathogenic bacteria, eukaryotes).
    Genetika 05/2004; 40(4):462-8. · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study the genome diversity of bacteriophages from geographically distant natural populations, new giant KZ-like Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages isolated in two different regions were compared with earlier known phages of three species (KZ, Lin68, EL). A broad spectrum of lytic activity was demonstrated for all KZ-like phages. Phages of the KZ species proved to be common in natural populations of various regions, while EL- and Lin68-related phages were extremely rare. Most KZ-related phages had unique DNA restriction patterns, but the differences between these were only minor, and the genomes did not contain nonhomologous fragments. The spectrum of capsid polypeptides proved to be conserved in each species, and was proposed as a character necessary and sufficient for express classification of phages with an accuracy of species. Phages isolated in different geographical regions showed no substantial difference. Some phages only slightly differing in DNA restriction pattern from KZ may be used to study the origin of KZ genes coding for orthologs of proteins of unrelated species (other phages, pathogenic bacteria, eukaryotes).
    Russian Journal of Genetics 01/2004; 40(4):363-368. DOI:10.1023/B:RUGE.0000024972.51075.06 · 0.41 Impact Factor