Helen Ding

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Druid Hills, GA, United States

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Publications (6)21.32 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Seasonal influenza vaccination has been routinely recommended for adults with high-risk conditions. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended that persons 25 to 64 years of age with high-risk conditions be one of the initial target groups to receive H1N1 vaccination during the 2009-2010 season. METHODS: We used data from the 2009-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. Vaccination levels of H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccination among respondents 25 to 64 years with high-risk conditions were assessed. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed to identify factors independently associated with vaccination. RESULTS: Overall, 24.8% of adults 25 to 64 years of age were identified to have high-risk conditions. Among adults 25 to 64 years of age with high-risk conditions, H1N1 and seasonal vaccination coverage were 26.3% and 47.6%, respectively. Characteristics independently associated with an increased likelihood of H1N1 vaccination were as follows: higher age; Hispanic race/ethnicity; medical insurance; ability to see a doctor if needed; having a primary doctor; a routine checkup in the previous year; not being a current smoker; and having high-risk conditions other than asthma, diabetes, and heart disease. Characteristics independently associated with seasonal influenza vaccination were similar compared with factors associated with H1N1 vaccination. CONCLUSION: Immunization programs should work with provider organizations to review efforts made to reach adults with high-risk conditions during the recent pandemic and assess how and where they can increase vaccination coverage during future pandemics.
    American journal of infection control 02/2013; · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This report describes surveillance systems used for assessing influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women in the United States. Coverage estimates and factors associated with maternal vaccination are reviewed for internet panel surveys of pregnant women and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS); new estimates are reported from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and Internet panel surveys. Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women improved from 11% during the 2001-2002 influenza season to approximately 38% measured by BRFSS and 50% measured by Internet panel surveys during the 2010-2011 influenza season. Coverage varied by state, ranging from 26% to 68% among the states participating in PRAMS in 2009-2010. Provider recommendation increased a woman's likelihood of vaccination nearly 6-fold. Despite increases in influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women, approximately half remain unvaccinated. Continued efforts are needed to ensure pregnant women receive recommendations and offers of vaccination from their health care providers.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 09/2012; 207(3 Suppl):S9-16. · 3.28 Impact Factor
  • Peng-jun Lu, Helen Ding, Carla L Black
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    ABSTRACT: Seasonal influenza vaccination routinely has been recommended for healthcare personnel (HCP) since 1984. The influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine (H1N1 vaccine) became available in the U.S. in October 2009. To assess 2009 H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccination coverage and identify factors independently associated with vaccination among HCP in the U.S. Data from the 2009-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) influenza supplemental survey were analyzed in 2011. Multivariable logistic regression and predictive marginal models were performed to identify factors independently associated with vaccination among HCP. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis procedure was used to estimate the cumulative proportion of people vaccinated. Among 16,975 HCP surveyed, 2009 H1N1, seasonal, and any-dose vaccination coverage were 34.1% (95% CI=32.7%, 35.5%); 52.4% (95% CI=50.9%, 53.9%); and 58.0% (95% CI=56.5%, 59.5%), respectively, all of which were significantly higher than those for non-HCP (19.1%, 34.9%, and 40.3%, respectively). The H1N1 vaccination coverage among HCP ranged from 18.4% in Mississippi to 56.1% in Massachusetts and seasonal influenza vaccination coverage ranged from 40.4% in Florida to 73.1% in Nebraska. Characteristics independently associated with an increased likelihood of 2009 H1N1, seasonal, and any-dose vaccinations among HCP were as follows: non-Hispanic white, higher income, having a high-risk condition, having health insurance, the ability to see a doctor if needed, and having had a routine checkup in the previous year. Vaccination coverage was higher among HCP than non-HCP but still below the national health objective of 90%. Knowledge of national and state-specific H1N1 and seasonal vaccination coverage among HCP is useful for evaluating the vaccination campaign and implementing strategies for increasing yearly seasonal vaccination coverage and improving vaccination coverage among HCP in possible future pandemics.
    American journal of preventive medicine 09/2012; 43(3):282-92. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (2009 H1N1) was first identified in April 2009 and quickly spread around the world. The first doses of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine (2009 H1N1 vaccine) became available in the U.S. in early October 2009. Because people with asthma are at increased risk of complications from influenza, people with asthma were included among the initial prioritized groups. To evaluate 2009 H1N1 vaccination coverage and identify factors independently associated with vaccination among adults with asthma in the U.S. Data from the 2009-2010 BRFSS (Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System) influenza supplemental survey were used; responses from March through June 2010 were analyzed to estimate vaccination levels of 2009 H1N1 vaccine among respondents aged 25-64 years with asthma. Multivariable logistic regression and predictive marginal models were performed to identify factors independently associated with vaccination. Among adults aged 25-64 years with asthma, 25.5% (95% CI=23.9%, 27.2%) received the 2009 H1N1 vaccination. Vaccination coverage ranged from 9.9% (95% CI=6.4%, 15.1%) in Mississippi to 46.1% (95% CI=33.3%, 61.2%) in Maine. Characteristics independently associated with an increased likelihood of vaccination among adults with asthma were as follows: had a primary doctor, had other high-risk conditions, and received seasonal influenza vaccination in the 2009-2010 season. Vaccination coverage among adults aged 25-64 years with asthma was only 25.5% and varied widely by state and demographic characteristics. National and state-specific 2009 H1N1 vaccination coverage data for adults with asthma are useful for evaluating the vaccination campaign and for planning and implementing strategies for increasing vaccination coverage in possible future pandemics.
    American journal of preventive medicine 12/2011; 41(6):619-26. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study was to evaluate and summarize reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a spontaneous reporting system, in pregnant women who received influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine to assess for potential vaccine safety problems. We reviewed reports of adverse events (AEs) in pregnant women who received 2009-H1N1 vaccines from Oct. 1, 2009, through Feb. 28, 2010. VAERS received 294 reports of AEs in pregnant women who received 2009-H1N1 vaccine: 288 after inactivated and 6 after the live attenuated vaccines. Two maternal deaths were reported. Fifty-nine women (20.1%) were hospitalized. We verified 131 pregnancy-specific outcomes: 95 spontaneous abortions (<20 weeks); 18 stillbirths (≥20 weeks); 7 preterm deliveries (<37 weeks); 3 threatened abortions; 2 preterm labor; 2 preeclampsia; and 1 each of fetal hydronephrosis, fetal tachycardia, intrauterine growth retardation, and cleft lip. Review of reports to VAERS following H1N1 vaccination in pregnant women did not identify any concerning patterns of maternal or fetal outcomes.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 06/2011; 205(5):473.e1-9. · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We sought to describe vaccination with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent (2009 H1N1) and trivalent seasonal (seasonal) vaccines among pregnant women during the 2009 through 2010 influenza season. A national H1N1 flu survey was conducted April through June 2010. The 2009 H1N1 and seasonal vaccination coverage estimates were 45.7% and 32.1%, respectively, among pregnant women aged 18-49 years. Receipt of a health care provider's recommendation for vaccination, perceived effectiveness of influenza vaccinations, and perceived high chance of influenza infection were independently associated with higher 2009 H1N1 and seasonal vaccination coverage. Pregnancy during October 2009 through January 2010 was independently associated with higher 2009 H1N1 vaccination coverage. The 2009 H1N1 vaccination level among pregnant women was higher than the seasonal vaccination level during the 2009 through 2010 season; it was also higher than vaccination among nonpregnant women with and without high-risk conditions. Health care providers and public health messaging played important roles in influencing vaccination behavior.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 06/2011; 204(6 Suppl 1):S96-106. · 3.28 Impact Factor