Noha Irani-Hakime

University of Monastir, Tunis-Ville, Tūnis, Tunisia

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Publications (28)74.08 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We tested the association of TCF7L2 variants with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in 691 Lebanese people and 919 controls. rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326, rs7895340, and rs12255372 minor allele frequencies were higher in T2DM. Haplotype analysis (rs7901695-rs4506565-rs7903146-rs12243326-rs7895340-rs11196205-rs12255372) identified positively- (2122112, 2222222) and negatively- (1111111) T2DM-associated haplotypes. TCF7L2 is a common T2DM candidate gene in Lebanese people.
    Diabetes research and clinical practice 10/2012; · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: While several type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) susceptibility loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been replicated in many populations, their association in Arabs has not been reported. For this reason, the present study looked at the contribution of ENNP1 (rs1044498), IGF2BP2 (rs1470579), KCNJ11 (rs5219), MLXIPL (rs7800944), PPARγ (rs1801282), SLC30A8 (rs13266634) and TCF7L2 (rs7903146) SNPs to the risk of T2DM in Lebanese and Tunisian Arabs. METHODS: Study subjects (case/controls) were Lebanese (751/918) and Tunisians (1470/838). Genotyping was carried out by the allelic discrimination method. RESULTS: In Lebanese and Tunisians, neither ENNP1 nor MLXIPL was associated with T2DM, whereas TCF7L2 was significantly associated with an increased risk of T2DM in both the Lebanese [P<0.001; OR (95% CI): 1.38 (1.20-1.59)] and Tunisians [P<0.001; OR (95% CI): 1.36 (1.18-1.56)]. Differential associations of IGF2BP2, KCNJ11, PPARγ and SLC30A8 with T2DM were noted in the two populations. IGF2BP2 [P=1.3×10(-5); OR (95% CI): 1.66 (1.42-1.94)] and PPARγ [P=0.005; OR (95% CI): 1.41 (1.10-1.80)] were associated with T2DM in the Lebanese, but not Tunisians, while KCNJ11 [P=8.0×10(-4); OR (95% CI): 1.27 (1.09-1.47)] and SLC30A8 [P=1.6×10(-5); OR (95% CI): 1.37 (1.15-1.62)] were associated with T2DM in the Tunisians, but not Lebanese, after adjusting for gender and body mass index. CONCLUSION: T2DM susceptibility loci SNPs identified through GWAS showed differential associations with T2DM in two Arab populations, thus further confirming the ethnic contributions of these variants to T2DM susceptibility.
    Diabetes & Metabolism 06/2012; · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several genome-wide association studies and replication analyses have identified common variation at the insulin-like binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2) gene to be associated with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim of this study was to replicate in a Lebanese Arab population identified associations of IGF2BP2 variants rs4402960 and rs1470579 with T2DM. This case-control study involved 544 T2DM patients and 606 control subjects. Genotyping was done by the allelic exclusion method. T allele of rs440960 (P=6.5 × 10(-6)) and C allele of rs1470579 (P=5.3 × 10(-4)) were significantly associated with T2DM; both SNPs were in strong LD (D'=0.83, r(2)=0.58). While both IGF2BP2 SNPs were significantly associated with T2DM under additive and recessive models, only rs4402960 remained significantly associated with T2DM under the dominant model. Taking the common rs4402960/rs1470579 GA haplotype as reference, multivariate analysis confirmed the positive association of TC (P=0.009; OR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.09-1.87), and TA (P<0.001; OR=5.49; 95%CI=2.09-14.39) haplotypes with increased T2DM risk. These differences remained significant after applying the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. We validate that IGF2BP2 susceptibility variants rs4402960 and rs1470579 associate with T2DM in Lebanese Arabs.
    Diabetes research and clinical practice 01/2012; 96(2):225-9. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thrombosis results from the interaction of environmental and genetic risk factors. These factors vary according to the ethnic and geographic distribution of the populations. The aim of this study is to define the role of acquired and genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis of lower extremities among Lebanese patients assessed in a university hospital and to discuss them according to the international literature. From January 2005 to January 2010, 166 patients (72 males and 94 females) were diagnosed with lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Mean age was 67 years (range: 25 to 96 years). The most frequently reported acquired risk factors for venous thrombosis in this study were advanced age, obesity, history of venous thromboembolism, immobilization, surgery, varicose veins and malignancy. Screening for prothrombotic genetic abnormalities was requested in patients with conditions highly suggestive of hypercoagulation state such as young patients, patients with spontaneous, recurrent or extensive venous thrombosis, patients with family history, oral contraceptives, air travel and pregnancy. All the 45 patients (27.1%) tested for thrombophilia were positive and were carriers for factors V-Leiden (17.4%), MTHFR C 677 T (16.8%), MTHFR A 1298 C (4.8%), II G 20210 A (1.8%) and V H 1299 R (1.2%) mutation. Twelve patients (7.2%) had increased homocysteine level. Advanced age is the most common risk factor for venous thrombosis in these series. Thrombophilia is the second most frequently observed risk factor and is related to the high prevalence of factor V-Leiden and MTHFR C 677 T mutation among the Lebanese population.
    Le Journal médical libanais. The Lebanese medical journal 01/2012; 60(1):24-9.
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    R Kreidy, N Irani-Hakime
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    ABSTRACT: Factor V Leiden (R506Q) mutation is the most commonly observed inherited genetic abnormality related to vein thrombosis. Lebanon has one of the highest frequencies of this mutation in the world with a prevalence of 14.4% in the general population. The aim of this study is to define risk factors including inherited genetic abnormalities among Lebanese patients with lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. We report the clinical outcome of patients with thrombophilia. From January 1998 to January 2008, 162 patients (61 males and 101 females) were diagnosed with lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Mean age was 61 years (range: 21 to 95 years). The most frequent risk factors for vein thrombosis were surgery, advanced age, obesity, and cancer. Twenty-five patients had thrombophilia, 16 patients had factor V Leiden (R506Q) mutation, and seven patients had MTHFR C677T mutation. Ninety-two percent of patients screened for thrombophilia were positive. Screening was requested in young patients (16), patients with recurrent (11), spontaneous (8), and extensive (5) venous thrombosis, familial history (5), pregnancy (4), estroprogestative treatment (3), and air travel (1). Nine patients had one, 11 patients had two, and five had three of these conditions. Follow-up (6 to 120 months) of these 25 patients treated with antivitamin K did not reveal recurrences or complications related to venous thromboembolism. Factor V Leiden mutation followed by MTHFR mutation are the most commonly observed genetic abnormalities in these series. Defining risk factors and screening for thrombophilia when indicated reduce recurrence rate and complications. Recommendations for thrombophilia screening will be proposed.
    Vascular Health and Risk Management 02/2009; 5:627-33.
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    ABSTRACT: Livedoid vasculopathy (LV) is an occlusive thrombotic disease of lower extremities. A 34-year-old woman presented with 4-year history of recurrent necrotic and painful lesions with violaceous and purpuric border on both legs. Initial treatment with hydroxychloroquine, dapsone and prednisone were unsuccessful. Skin biopsy showed inflammatory infiltrate with epidermal necrosis. Prothrombin G20210A and factor V-Leiden heterozygosity, and MTHFR C677T homozygosity with hyperhomocysteinemia were confirmed. LV diagnosis was made; acetylsalicylic acid, folic acid, vitamin B12, and prednisone treatement resulted in complete healing. This is the first report on coexistence of prothrombin G20210A, factor V-Leiden, and homozygous MTHFR C677T with hyperhomocysteinemia in LV.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2008; 26(1):31-4. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The association of HLA class II with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) was investigated in Bahraini and Lebanese subjects. DRB1*070101 (Lebanese and Bahraini) and DQB1*0201 (Lebanese) were susceptibility-conferring alleles, and unique susceptibility-conferring/protective haplotypes were found in both patient groups. Regression analysis confirmed that DRB1*070101-DQB1*0201 (Bahraini) and DRB1*110101-DQB1*0201 (Lebanese) were susceptibility-conferring haplotypes.
    Clinical and Vaccine Immunology 12/2006; 13(11):1296-8. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) was determined among 16,084 blood donors (14,993 males; mean age, 31.7 +/- 8.2 years and 1084 females; mean age, 31.4 +/- 8.2 years) in the period 1997-2003. Of the donors screened, 149 were HBsAg positive (0.926%), and 65 were anti-HCV positive (0.404%). There was a steady decline in HBsAg prevalence from 1.56% (1997) to 0.33% (2003) and in anti-HCV from 1.22% (1997) to 0.16% (2003). Females had a higher prevalence of anti-HCV (P = .031) and HBsAg (P = .047). Results obtained are of value in light of the occurrence of HBV and HCV transmission by nonparenteral routes.
    American Journal of Infection Control 06/2006; 34(4):241-3. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes contribute to the genetic susceptibility of type 1 diabetes (T1D), and both susceptible and protective alleles were implicated with its pathogenesis, which varies among various ethnic/racial groups. This study investigated the heterogeneity in HLA class II haplotypes distribution among Bahraini and Lebanese T1D patients. This was a cross-sectional retrospective study. The study was conducted at primary care private and public health centers. Subjects comprised 126 T1D patients and 126 healthy controls from Bahrain and 78 Lebanese T1D patients and 111 control subjects. Intervention(s): There were no interventions. Although Lebanese and Bahraini patients share DRB1*030101, DQB1*0201 as susceptible and DRB1*100101 and DQB1*030101 as protective alleles, DRB1*040101 was an additional susceptible allele in Bahraini patients, and DRB1*130701 and DQB1*050101 were additional susceptible and protective alleles in Lebanese, respectively. DRB1*030101-DQB1*0201 was susceptible, whereas DRB1*070101-DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101-DQB1*030101 were protective haplotypes in Bahraini and Lebanese. DRB1*040101-DQB1*0302 and DRB1*040101-DQB1*050101 displayed different associations: they were protective in Lebanese but susceptible or neutral among Bahrainis. Whereas the frequency of homozygous DRB1*03011-DQB1*0201 was higher in Bahraini and to a lesser extent Lebanese patients, homozygous DRB1*110101-DQB1*030101 was significantly more frequent in Lebanese but not Bahraini controls, whereas DRB1*030101-DQB1*0201/DRB1*040101-DQB1*0201 was the major genotype among Bahraini patients but not Lebanese subjects in whom it was present at very low frequencies. In view of these differences between Bahraini and Lebanese, this demonstrates that the contribution of HLA class II to the genetic susceptibility to T1D must be evaluated with regard to specific HLA haplotypes and also ethnic origin and racial background.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 10/2005; 90(9):5104-9. · 6.43 Impact Factor
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    G Ameen, N Irani-Hakime, N A Fawaz, T Mahjoub, W Y Almawi
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 10/2005; 3(9):2126-7. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) G1691A in coagulation factor V (FV)-Leiden and G20210A in prothrombin (PRT) genes with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were analyzed in 112 T2DM patients (58 males, 54 females; mean age 55.24 +/- 13.5 years) and 249 healthy control subjects (118 males, 131 females; mean age 53.03 +/- 13.8 years). No association was found for FV-Leiden with T2DM, as the frequency of the G/G (82.1% vs. 85.5%), G/A (17.0% vs. 14.1%), and A/A (0.9% vs. 0.4%) genotypes was not different between patients and controls, respectively (P = 0.644). Similarly, lack of association of PRT G20210A with T2DM was seen among the population studied, and the frequency of the G/G (92.9% vs. 97.2%), G/A (6.3% vs. 2.8%), and A/A (0.9% vs. 0.0%) genotypes was similar among patients and controls, respectively (P = 0.094). Neither FV-Leiden nor PRT G20210A was associated with, and no evidence for interactions between these mutations was seen in, T2DM.
    American Journal of Hematology 10/2005; 80(1):84-6. · 4.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Insofar as the inherited prothrombotic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) factor V G1691A (FV-Leiden), prothrombin (PRT) G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), C677T are inherited risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE), the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of single and combined SNPs in 198 patients with documented deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and 697 control subjects, and to estimate the associated risks. Factor V-Leiden, PRT G20210A, and MTHFR C677T were analyzed by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The prevalence of the heterozygote and homozygous variants for FV-Leiden (52.02 vs. 14.78%, RR 6.28), PRT G20210A (19.2 vs. 3.6%; RR 6.38), and to a lesser extent the T/T genotype of MTHFR C677T (20.71 vs. 11.0%; RR 1.49) were higher among DVT patients vs. controls, respectively. Two or more SNPs were detected in 90 of 198 patients (45.5%) and in 60 of 697 controls (8.6%), with odds ratios of 16.754 for joint occurrence of FV-Leiden and PRT G20210A, 10.471 for FV-Leiden and MTHFR C677T, and 6.283 for PRT G20210A SNPs and MTHFR 677T/T. Logistic regression analysis showed a further increased odds for FV-Leiden in combination with PRT G20210A (85.198) or homozygous MTHFR C677T (81.133), and to a lesser extent for PRT G20210A in combination with homozygous MTHFR C677T (20.812). This indicates that FV-Leiden and PRT G20210A, more than MTHFR C677T, are important risk factors for DVT, and that the presence of more than one prothrombotic SNPs was associated with a significant risk of DVT.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2005; 19(3):189-96. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In view of its role in precipitating mild hyperhomocysteinemia as well as being a risk factor for vascular thrombosis, we investigated the frequency of the C677T mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene among 589 healthy Lebanese subjects by PCR-RFLP analysis (HinfI digestion) and compared them with those of other countries of Caucasian and non-Caucasian origin. The prevalence of the mutated homozygous (T/T) and heterozygous (C/T) C677T MTHFR genotype was 11.04% and 39.73%, respectively, giving an allele frequency of 0.309. While the prevalence of the T/T genotype was similar with respect to gender, higher prevalence was noted among Christian (13.08%) compared to Moslem (7.66%) subjects (P < 0.001), and heterogeneity in its distribution was seen in the different Lebanese provinces, and was directly related to the Christian/Moslem composition of each province. The distribution of the MTHFR C677T in Lebanon is unique with regard to its higher occurrence among Christians compared to Moslems, adding to the existing body of literature on the heterogeneity of its prevalence and distribution.
    American Journal of Hematology 06/2004; 76(1):85-7. · 4.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Single point mutations in the genes coding for factor V [G1691A; Leiden], prothrombin [PRT; G20210A], and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase [MTHFR, C677T] were shown to be major inherited predisposing factors for venous thromboembolism. However, their contribution in the development of coronary artery disease [CAD] remains controversial. The aim of the study was to examine the association of these mutations in CAD. A total of 96 patients with angiographically-demonstrated CAD [mean age 55.3 +/- 11.3], and 404 healthy subjects [mean age 50.7 +/- 8.9] were recruited into the study. Fasting plasma homocysteine was determined by HPLC, and genotype analysis was assessed by PCR-RFLP. The carrier frequency of factor V-Leiden (14.6% vs. 15.1%, p = 0.617) and PRT G20210A (3.1% vs. 3.0%; p = 0.936) were similar between patients and controls, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of the MTHFR variant C677T was 71.9% among patients compared with 45.5% in controls (p < 0.001), of which the T/T genotype was significantly higher among patients (31.3%) than controls (4.5%; p < 0.001). Significantly higher homocysteine levels were seen among T/T genotype in both groups compared to non-T/T carriers (p < 0.05), and among patients compared with controls (18.47 +/- 3.73 micromol/L vs. 16.28 +/- 4.16 micromol/L). In addition, the coexistence of MTHFR C677T with FV-Leiden was seen in 10.4% of CAD patients compared 6.9% of controls (p = 0.001). While results from this study clearly demonstrate a strong association of hyperhomocysteinemia and homozygosity of the MTHFR C677T, but not FV-Leiden or PRT G20210A, mutations with confirmed CAD, they also suggest a potential role for factor V-Leiden in MTHFR C677T carriers.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 06/2004; 17(3):199-205. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the source of an epidemic of Burkholderia cepacia bloodstream infections during 7 years (411 episodes in 361 patients). Outbreak investigation. A 250-bed university hospital in Beirut, Lebanon. Matched case-control and retrospective cohort studies, and microbiological surveillance and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length ascertainment were employed. Special media and filtration techniques were used to isolate organisms from water and diluted alcohol solutions. In a group of 50 randomly selected case-matched patients from 1999, the positive blood cultures were concomitant with fever in 98%, intravenous phlebitis in 44%, and recurrent bacteremia in 20%. Fever disappeared approximately 6 hours after intravenous catheter removal. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism revealed strain homogeneity in patient, water, and alcohol isolates. Contaminated tap water had been used to dilute alcohol for skin antisepsis and for decontamination of the caps of heparin vials. Only sporadic cases directly attributable to breach of protocol were reported after single-use alcohol swabs were substituted. This is potentially the largest single-source nosocomial bloodstream infection outbreak ever reported, and the first report of an alcohol skin antiseptic contaminated by tap water as a source for nosocomial bacteremia.
    Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 04/2004; 25(3):231-9. · 4.02 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation Proceedings 12/2003; 35(7):2748-9. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess percentages of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in infected Lebanese patients referred to St. George Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon, 77 infected cases were studied. Of those, 27 were hemodialysis patients. Genotyping was performed by nested PCR of the HCV core-region with specific primers, followed by DNA enzyme-immunoassay using HCV type and subtype-specific probes. Single genotype infections were detected in 52 patients (67.5%). In these cases, types 1, 2, 3 and 4 were detected in 19.5%, 32.5%, 5.1% and 10.4% of the cases respectively. Twenty-five (32.5%) samples showed mixed genotype infections. Single genotype distribution was significantly different among dialysis and non-dialysis patients. In the dialysis group, genotype 2 was predominant (80%, p < 0.001). In single HCV genotype-infected patients, subtype 1b was frequently detected in nondialysis cases (34.4%) whereas this genotype was found in only 5% of dialysis cases. Genotypes 5 and 6 were not detected in any of the cases studied. This pilot hospital-based study provides evidence for the diversity of HCV genotypes in the Lebanese population and establishes differences in distribution depending on the risk group.
    Le Journal médical libanais. The Lebanese medical journal 01/2003; 51(3):121-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cervical carcinoma. The study addressed the expression and detection of HPV genotypes in cervical and vaginal specimens of women with normal and abnormal cytology by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), each woman serving as her own control. Study participants (127) were subgrouped into CIN-positive and CIN-negative, based on cytology screening, and endocervical and vaginal scrapes were collected by a gynecologist and placed immediately in saline. HPV DNA was assessed by PCR, and HPV genotypes were determined by hybridization of PCR products with type-specific biotinylated probes. Of the 127 participants, 55 tested positive and 72 tested negative for HPV DNA. While there was no difference between the two groups with regards to age or to number of pregnancies, higher numbers of smokers and of women with multiple sexual partners and abnormal cytology were seen in the HPV-positive group (P < 0.001). HPV DNA was detected in the vaginal scrapes of all HPV-positive, but in none of the HPV-negative women (sensitivity and specificity = 1.0). Furthermore, the HPV genotype was the same in vaginal and endocervical specimens in all the HPV-positive women. HPV detection by PCR, using endocervical or vaginal sampling, is a sensitive and highly specific test for the identification of HPV infection, in particular in women with cytomorphologically normal cervices.
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection 01/2002; 7(12):688-92. · 4.58 Impact Factor
  • N Irani-Hakime, H Tamim, H Samaha, W Y Almawi
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in many individuals is asymptomatic and the prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) among blood donors in Lebanon is scarce. This study aimed to address the prevalence of anti-HCV in 8700 blood donors, the data obtained was compared to other world regions. Between 1997 and 2000, 8700 blood donors were screened for the presence of anti-HCV in their sera. Initially reactive specimens were retested in duplicate, and repeatedly positive samples were subsequently retested by a third generation microplate enzyme immunoassay. Of the 8700 blood donors screened, 51 were confirmed positive for anti-HCV, giving a prevalence rate of 0.6%. While there was no difference in anti-HCV prevalence in relation to age or gender, higher rates were seen in non-Lebanese compared to Lebanese subjects (6.17% vs. 0.48%, P < 0.001). None of the anti-HCV positive individuals had an identifiable risk factor for contracting HCV (intravenous drug user, prior transfusion, etc.), and their transaminases were comparable to anti-HCV-negative donors, suggesting that HCV-positive donors were asymptomatic. These results demonstrate low prevalence of anti-HCV among Lebanese blood donors, which was comparable to those established for Western countries.
    Clinical & Laboratory Haematology 10/2001; 23(5):317-23. · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A specific point G-A transition at nucleotide position 1691 in the factor V (FV) gene, FV-Leiden, was associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Insofar as the association of FV-Leiden with coronary artery disease (CAD) remains poorly defined, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of FV-Leiden in a sample of 68 VTE patients, 69 CAD patients, and 192 randomly selected healthy subjects. Total genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of study subjects and was used for PCR analysis. The presence (or absence) of FV-Leiden was assessed by PCR using primers flanking the mutant site (nt 1691), followed by hybridization with wild-type ('G') and mutant ('A') biotinylated DNA probes; detection was by DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA). While the prevalence of FV-Leiden in CAD patients was not statistically different from that of healthy subjects (14.5 % vs. 15.1 %; P=0.890, odds ratio 0.95; 95 % confidence interval 0.43--2.06), a significant increase in FV-Leiden prevalence was seen in VTE patients (70.6 % in VTE patients; P<0.001, odds ratio 13.4, 95 % confidence interval 6.9--25.8). Of the 48 VTE patients who tested positive for FV-Leiden, 42 were heterozygotes (G/A), while 6 were homozygotes (A/A) (allele frequency 0.397). All 10 CAD patients positive for FV-Leiden were heterozygote carriers (allele frequency 0.072). While gender was not a factor in FV-Leiden expression, higher prevalence in FV-Leiden was seen in younger (< or =45 years) VTE patients (38/51 vs. 10/17). FV-Leiden is a major inherited risk factor for VTE, with a peak incidence in younger patients, but does not appear to play any role in CAD pathogenesis in the population studied.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2001; 11(2):111-6. · 1.99 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

296 Citations
74.08 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • University of Monastir
      Tunis-Ville, Tūnis, Tunisia
    • University Medical Center – Rizk Hospital
      Beyrouth, Beyrouth, Lebanon
  • 2004–2006
    • Arabian Gulf University
      • Department of Medical Biochemistry
      Manama, Capital Governorate, Bahrain
    • Saint Joseph University, Lebanon
      Beyrouth, Beyrouth, Lebanon
  • 2005
    • Beirut University
      Beyrouth, Beyrouth, Lebanon
  • 2003–2004
    • Saint George Hospital University Medical Center
      Beyrouth, Beyrouth, Lebanon
  • 2001
    • American University of Beirut
      • Faculty of Health Sciences
      Beirut, Mohafazat Beyrouth, Lebanon