Zhaoxiang Deng

Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

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Publications (14)94.31 Total impact

  • Yu He · Haipeng Liu · Yi Chen · Ye Tian · Zhaoxiang Deng · Seung Hyeon Ko · Tao Ye · Chengde Mao
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    ABSTRACT: Beyond its biological importance, short DNA sequences are of increasing interest as excellent and versatile building blocks, in material science and nanotechnology. DNA nanotechnology has been rapidly developed and has branched into several significantly different directions. Controlling DNA nanostructures is one of the most important branches, in which well-defined static nanostructures are constructed from rationally designed DNA motifs. The diversity and complexity of such DNA nanostructures also endow them with promising applications in nanofabrications, nanoelectronics, biodiagnostics, and DNA computations. In this review, we will summarize our recent efforts in this direction.
    Microscopy Research and Technique 06/2007; 70(6):522-9. DOI:10.1002/jemt.20475 · 1.17 Impact Factor
  • John Lund · Jianchun Dong · Zhaoxiang Deng · Chengde Mao · Babak A Parviz
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    ABSTRACT: We examine the morphological and electrical characteristics of nanowires fabricated on DNA templates via palladium (Pd) reduction. λ-DNA molecules were stretched and aligned on a mica surface using a molecular combing technique, followed by an electroless deposition of palladium, resulting in formation of nanowires with nominal width of 7 nm. We investigated the size distribution of nanowires with atomic force microscopy and made electrical connections to the wires by metal evaporation through multiple shadow masks. Electrical characterization of the nanowires under various bias conditions, variable temperature, and with different contact metal work functions revealed a conduction mechanism resembling that of granular metals.
    Nanotechnology 05/2006; 17(11):2752. DOI:10.1088/0957-4484/17/11/007 · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    Zhaoxiang Deng · Yi Chen · Ye Tian · Chengde Mao
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    ABSTRACT: Synthetic DNA structures for nanotechnological applications have experienced substantial success during the past decades benefiting from Seeman and his coworkers' pioneering work. In the last few years, some new branches have been emerging in this field. This review will summarize some recent progress in the authors' group.
    01/2006
  • Zhaoxiang Deng · Seung-Hyun Lee · Chengde Mao
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    ABSTRACT: The use of DNA as programmable building blocks to achieve highly-definable nanostructures, termed as DNA nanotechnology, has offered great opportunities to control matter at a very small scale. Fast growing researches along this direction has led to the emergence of several significant branches of DNA nanotechnology. This review intends to summarize the recent developments in this area. Several topics will be discussed with a focus on the works from the authors' group, including (1) DNA self-assembly and DNA-directed self-assembly, (2) DNA nanomachines, (3) DNA-based electronics, (4) DNA assisted nanofabrications, and (5) DNA computations.
    Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 01/2006; 5(12):1954-63. DOI:10.1166/jnn.2005.504 · 1.34 Impact Factor
  • Yu He · Ye Tian · Yi Chen · Zhaoxiang Deng · Alexander E Ribbe · Chengde Mao
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    ABSTRACT: (Figure Presented) Grand designs: DNA sequence symmetry is explored as a tool for designing DNA nanostructures. The resulting symmetric DNA motifs can self-assemble into two-dimensional arrays as wide as 1 mm (see picture). The DNA arrays can be used as templates to fabricate nanostructures of other materials, such as gold.
    Angewandte Chemie International Edition 10/2005; 44(41):6694-6. DOI:10.1002/anie.200502193 · 11.26 Impact Factor
  • J. Lund · Jianchun Dong · Zhaoxiang Deng · CHengde Mao · B. Parviz
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    ABSTRACT: This paper outlines a method for the fabrication of metal nanowires using ordered DNA networks as a template. The paper also includes a verification of the functionality of these nanowires. Strands of λ-DNA were aligned on a mica surface and coated with palladium via electroless deposition. Electrical contacts were then formed on the surface using thermal evaporation through a mesh of thin wires. Conductivity between adjacent pads was measured and compared to AFM images of the wires between the pads to determine their electrical properties.
    Nanotechnology, 2005. 5th IEEE Conference on; 08/2005
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    ABSTRACT: (Figure Presented) Strands of gold: Extended one-dimensional arrays of gold nanoparticles up to 4 μm long can be assembled by hybridization between thiolated DNA/nanoparticle 1:1 conjugates and long DNA templates, which were prepared by rolling-circle polymerization (see picture). The linear self-assembled structures could link the nanometric properties of materials with the convenience of micrometric manipulation.
    Angewandte Chemie International Edition 06/2005; 44(23):3582-5. DOI:10.1002/anie.200463096 · 11.26 Impact Factor
  • Zhaoxiang Deng · Chengde Mao
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports a simple bottom-up method that can controllably fabricate 2D hexagonally oriented and randomly distributed CdCl(2).H(2)O nanorods on mica surfaces. The as-formed nanorod assemblies have been successfully replicated into various matrixes, including gold, poly(dimethylsiloxane), and polyurethane. Thus, this method is compatible with soft-lithography towards further applications.
    Langmuir 10/2004; 20(19):8078-82. DOI:10.1021/la0497806 · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    Dan Shu · Wulf-Dieter Moll · Zhaoxiang Deng · Chengde Mao · Peixuan Guo
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    ABSTRACT: DNA and protein have been extensively scrutinized for feasibility as parts in nanotechnology, but another natural building block, RNA, has been largely ignored. RNA can be manipulated to form versatile shapes, thus providing an element of adaptability to DNA nanotechnology, which is predominantly based upon a double-helical structure. The DNA-packaging motor of bacterial virus phi29 contains six DNA-packaging RNAs (pRNA), which together form a hexameric ring via loop/loop interaction. Here we report that this pRNA can be redesigned to form a variety of structures and shapes, including twins, tetramers, rods, triangles, and 3D arrays several microns in size via interaction of programmed helical regions and loops. Three dimensional RNA array formation required a defined nucleotide number for twisting of the interactive helix and a palindromic sequence. Such arrays are unusually stable and resistant to a wide range of temperatures, salt concentrations, and pH.
    Nano Letters 09/2004; 4(9):1717-23. DOI:10.1021/nl0494497 · 13.59 Impact Factor
  • Zhaoxiang Deng · Chengde Mao
    Angewandte Chemie International Edition 08/2004; 43(31):3983-3983. DOI:10.1002/anie.200490104 · 11.26 Impact Factor
  • Zhaoxiang Deng · Chengde Mao
    Angewandte Chemie 08/2004; 116(31):4073-4073. DOI:10.1002/ange.200490104
  • Zhaoxiang Deng · Chengde Mao
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    ABSTRACT: Unmasking the potential: A DNA-templated nanofabrication approach is reported in which various 1D and 2D DNA nanostructures were assembled, and then these structures transformed into corresponding metal nanostructures through metal deposition (see schematic representation). The ease and flexibility of this technique offers a route to overcome the inabilities faced by traditional lithographic techniques.
    Angewandte Chemie International Edition 08/2004; 43(31):4068-70. DOI:10.1002/anie.200460257 · 11.26 Impact Factor
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    Dage Liu · Mingsheng Wang · Zhaoxiang Deng · Richard Walulu · Chengde Mao
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    ABSTRACT: A tensegrity strategy has been explored to construct a rigid geometrical structure (triangles) from flexible DNA four-arm junctions. The resulting DNA triangles could self-assemble into 1D and 2D arrays. This tensegrity strategy is expected to play an important role in the design of biomimetic nanomaterials.
    Journal of the American Chemical Society 04/2004; 126(8):2324-5. DOI:10.1021/ja031754r · 11.44 Impact Factor
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    Zhaoxiang Deng · Chengde Mao
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports a simple method for the fabrication of ordered nanostructures composed of metallic nanowires. Molecular combing was used to stretch and align linear λ-DNA molecules into parallel or crossed patterns. Subsequent metallization of DNA through electroless palladium deposition yielded 1D parallel or 2D crossed metallic nanowire arrays. This method has potential use in building interconnects between nanosized building blocks toward nanodevice construction.
    Nano Letters 09/2003; 3(11). DOI:10.1021/nl034720q · 13.59 Impact Factor