Dana E McClintock

University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States

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Publications (5)31.78 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To test the hypothesis that the concentration of angiopoietin-2 relative to angiopoietin-1 may be a useful biological marker of mortality in acute lung injury patients. We also tested the association of concentration of angiopoietin-2 relative to angiopoietin-1 with physiologic and biological markers of activated endothelium. Prospective, observational cohort study. Intensive care units in a tertiary care university hospital and a university-affiliated city hospital. Fifty-six mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury. Baseline plasma samples and pulmonary dead-space fraction measurements were collected within 48 hrs of acute lung injury diagnosis. Plasma levels of angiopoietin-1 and angiopoietin-2 and of biomarkers of endothelial activation were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Baseline concentration of angiopoietin-2 relative to angiopoietin-1 was significantly higher in patients who died (median, 58 [interquartile range, 17-117] vs. 14 [interquartile range, 6-35]; p = .01). In a multivariable analysis stratified by dead-space fraction, concentration of angiopoietin-2 relative to angiopoietin-1 was an independent predictor of death, with an adjusted odds ratio of 4.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-13.5; p = .01) in those with an elevated pulmonary dead-space fraction (p = .03 for interaction between pulmonary dead-space fraction and concentration of angiopoietin-2 relative to angiopoietin-1). Moderate to weak correlation was found with biological markers of endothelial activation. The ratio of concentration of angiopoietin-2 relative to angiopoietin-1 may be a prognostic biomarker of endothelial activation in acute lung injury patients and, along with pulmonary dead-space fraction, may be useful for risk stratification of acute lung injury patients, particularly in identifying subgroups for future research and therapeutic trials.
    Critical care medicine 09/2010; 38(9):1845-51. · 6.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure with high mortality despite lung-protective ventilation. Prior work has shown disordered inflammation and coagulation in ALI, with strong correlations between biomarker abnormalities and worse clinical outcomes. We measured plasma markers of inflammation, coagulation and fibrinolysis simultaneously to assess whether these markers remain predictive in the era of lung-protective ventilation. Plasma samples and ventilator data were prospectively collected from 50 patients with early ALI. Plasma biomarkers of inflammation (IL-6, IL-8, intercellular adhesion molecule 1), of coagulation (thrombomodulin, protein C) and of fibrinolysis (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1) were measured by ELISA. Biomarker levels were compared between survivors (n = 29) and non-survivors (n = 21) using Mann-Whitney analysis. The tidal volume for the study group was 6.6 +/- 1.1 ml/kg predicted body weight and the plateau pressure was 25 +/- 7 cmH2O (mean +/- standard deviation), consistent with lung-protective ventilation. All markers except IL-6 were significantly different between survivors and nonsurvivors. Nonsurvivors had more abnormal values. Three biomarkers - IL-8, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and protein C - remained significantly different by multivariate analysis that included age, gender, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II and all biomarkers that were significant on bivariate analysis. Higher levels of IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 were independently predictive of worse outcomes (odds ratio = 2.0 and 5.8, respectively; P = 0.04 for both). Lower levels of protein C were independently associated with an increased risk of death (odds ratio = 0.5), a result that nearly reached statistical significance (P = 0.06). Despite lung-protective ventilation, abnormalities in plasma levels of markers of inflammation, coagulation and fibrinolysis predict mortality in ALI patients, indicating more severe activation of these biologic pathways in nonsurvivors.
    Critical care (London, England) 02/2008; 12(2):R41. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nitrogen oxide (NO) species are markers for oxidative stress that may be pathogenic in acute lung injury (ALI). We tested two hypotheses in patients with ALI: (1) higher levels of urine NO would be associated with worse clinical outcomes, and (2) ventilation with lower VT would reduce urine NO as a result of less stretch injury. Urine NO levels were measured by chemiluminescence in 566 patients enrolled in the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network trial of 6 ml/kg versus 12 ml/kg VT ventilation. The data were expressed corrected and uncorrected for urine creatinine (Cr). Higher baseline levels of urine NO to Cr were associated with lower mortality (odds ratio, 0.43 per log(10) increase in the ratio), more ventilator-free days (mean increase, 1.9 d), and more organ-failure-free days (mean increase, 2.3 d) on multivariate analysis (p < 0.05 for all analyses). Similar results were obtained using urine NO alone. NO to Cr levels were higher on Day 3 in the 6 ml/kg than in the 12 ml/kg VT group (p = 0.04). Contrary to our hypothesis, higher urine NO was associated with improved outcomes in ALI at baseline and after treatment with the 6 ml/kg VT strategy. Higher endogenous NO may reflect less severe lung injury and better preservation of the pulmonary and systemic endothelium or may serve a protective function in patients with ALI.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 02/2007; 175(3):256-62. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Desmosine is a stable breakdown product of elastin that can be reliably measured in urine samples. We tested the hypothesis that higher baseline urine desmosine would be associated with higher mortality in 579 of 861 patients included in the recent Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network trial of lower tidal volume ventilation (1). We also correlated urine desmosine levels with indexes of disease severity. Finally, we assessed whether urine desmosine was lower in patients who received lower tidal volumes. Desmosine was measured by radioimmunoassay in urine samples from days 0, 1, and 3 of the study. The data were expressed as a ratio of urine desmosine to urine creatinine to control for renal dilution. The results show that higher baseline (day 0) urine desmosine-to-creatinine concentration was associated with a higher risk of death on adjusted analysis (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.82, P=0.03). Urine desmosine increased in both ventilator groups from day 0 to day 3, but the average rise was higher in the 12-ml/kg predicted body weight group compared with the 6-ml/kg predicted body weight group (P=0.053, repeated-measures model). In conclusion, patients with acute lung injury ventilated with lower tidal volumes have lower urine desmosine levels, a finding that may reflect reduced extracellular matrix breakdown. These results illustrate the value of evaluating urinary biological markers that may have prognostic and pathogenetic significance in acute lung injury.
    AJP Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology 11/2006; 291(4):L566-71. · 3.52 Impact Factor
  • Dana E McClintock, Michael A Matthay
    Critical Care Medicine 03/2004; 32(2):583-4. · 6.12 Impact Factor