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Publications (5)9.93 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Commercial health plans need member racial/ethnic information to address disparities, but often lack it. We incorporate the U.S. Census Bureau’s latest surname list into a previous Bayesian method that integrates surname and geocoded information to better impute self-reported race/ethnicity. We validate this approach with data from 1,921,133 enrollees of a national health plan. Overall, the new approach correlated highly with self-reported race-ethnicity (0.76), which is 19% more efficient than its predecessor (and 41% and 108% more efficient than single-source surname and address methods, respectively, P
    Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology 01/2009; 9(4):252-253.
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    ABSTRACT: To efficiently estimate race/ethnicity using administrative records to facilitate health care organizations' efforts to address disparities when self-reported race/ethnicity data are unavailable. Surname, geocoded residential address, and self-reported race/ethnicity from 1,973,362 enrollees of a national health plan. We compare the accuracy of a Bayesian approach to combining surname and geocoded information to estimate race/ethnicity to two other indirect methods: a non-Bayesian method that combines surname and geocoded information and geocoded information alone. We assess accuracy with respect to estimating (1) individual race/ethnicity and (2) overall racial/ethnic prevalence in a population. The Bayesian approach was 74 percent more efficient than geocoding alone in estimating individual race/ethnicity and 56 percent more efficient in estimating the prevalence of racial/ethnic groups, outperforming the non-Bayesian hybrid on both measures. The non-Bayesian hybrid was more efficient than geocoding alone in estimating individual race/ethnicity but less efficient with respect to prevalence (p<.05 for all differences). The Bayesian Surname and Geocoding (BSG) method presented here efficiently integrates administrative data, substantially improving upon what is possible with a single source or from other hybrid methods; it offers a powerful tool that can help health care organizations address disparities until self-reported race/ethnicity data are available.
    Health Services Research 05/2008; 43(5 Pt 1):1722-36. · 2.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study explored how HIV care differs for infected persons with and without severe mental illness. Data were obtained through interviews with and chart review of 295 patients with severe mental illness and HIV from public mental health agencies in Los Angeles County and New York City. Data were compared with data from 1,294 HIV patients without severe mental illness from a separate national probability sample. Measures were difficulty obtaining care, whether patients recommend their HIV care provider, hospital problem score, functional health status, and disability days. In Los Angeles, HIV patients with severe mental illness were more likely than those without severe mental illness to have difficulty obtaining care (p<.001); to not recommend their provider (10% versus 5%, p=.007); and to have problematic hospital care (p=.001), poor health status (p=.001), and more disability days (p<.001). In New York City, HIV patients with severe mental illness were more likely than patients without severe mental illness to have difficulty obtaining care (p=.002) and not recommend their provider (p=.02). The relationship between severe mental illness and health status in Los Angeles and access in New York City became insignificant after adjustment for sociodemographic factors, drug use, and CD4 cell count. Further adjustment for higher case management rates among HIV patients with severe mental illness reduced disparities only in the West. Patients with severe mental illness experienced more problems with HIV care than patients without severe mental illness, although high case management rates for patients with severe mental illness may have offset some problems.
    Psychiatric Services 05/2007; 58(5):681-8. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to describe religiosity and denominational affiliation among the U.S. population living with HIV and to test whether either is associated with HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. A nationally representative sample of 1,421 people in care for HIV, 932 of whom reported recent sexual activity, was utilized. Religiosity was associated with fewer sexual partners and a lower likelihood of engaging in unprotected sex and in high-risk sex. Catholics were less likely to report unprotected sex than were other Christians, adherents of non-Christian religions, and those reporting no religious affiliation. Catholics were also less likely than other Christians to report high-risk sex and reported fewer sexual partners compared to those of non-Christian religions. We did not observe a difference between Catholics and Evangelicals in the three sexual behaviors investigated. Results suggest that religiosity and some religious teachings may promote safer sex among people with HIV.
    The Journal of Sex Research 03/2007; 44(1):49-58. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Individuals with serious mental illness are at higher risk for HIV than are members of the general population. Although studies have shown that individuals with serious mental illness experience less adequate care and worse physical health outcomes than comparable patients without serious mental illness, little is known about HIV care among individuals with serious mental illness who become infected with HIV. In the present study, we describe patterns of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) use and physician monitoring received by 154 patients with serious mental illness infected with HIV. Participants were recruited from mental health agencies in Los Angeles, California. Data from 762 HIV-only patients from a separate Western U.S. probability sample were used for comparison. High proportions of serious mental illness patients with HIV in our sample appeared to be receiving adequate HIV care. Fifty-one percent of all serious mental illness patients with serious mental illness with HIV were taking HAART, and the majority received close monitoring of their CD4 counts (84%) and viral loads (82%) throughout a 1-year period. HAART use and patterns of CD4 count and viral load monitoring did not differ significantly between patients with both serious mental illness and HIV, and patients with HIV only (all p > 0.05). Specialized programs providing assistance to serious mental illness populations with HIV may be helping to narrow health care disparities as a result of having serious mental illness.
    AIDS PATIENT CARE and STDs 03/2006; 20(3):175-82. · 3.09 Impact Factor