S. Dahm

Honolulu University, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States

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Publications (3)20.2 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We present the first near-IR scattered light detection of the transitional disk associated with the Herbig Ae star MWC 758 using data obtained as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru, and 1.1 micron HST/NICMOS data. While sub-millimeter studies suggested there is a dust-depleted cavity with r=0.35, we find scattered light as close as 0.1 (20-28 AU) from the star, with no visible cavity at H, K', or Ks. We find two small-scaled spiral structures which asymmetrically shadow the outer disk. We model one of the spirals using spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h ~ 0.18, indicating a dynamically warm disk. If the spiral pattern is excited by a perturber, we estimate its mass to be 5+3,-4 Mj, in the range where planet filtration models predict accretion continuing onto the star. Using a combination of non-redundant aperture masking data at L' and angular differential imaging with Locally Optimized Combination of Images at K' and Ks, we exclude stellar or massive brown dwarf companions within 300 mas of the Herbig Ae star, and all but planetary mass companions exterior to 0.5. We reach 5-sigma contrasts limiting companions to planetary masses, 3-4 MJ at 1.0 and 2 MJ at 1.55 using the COND models. Collectively, these data strengthen the case for MWC 758 already being a young planetary system.
    The Astrophysical Journal 12/2012; 762(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present Keck/NIRC2 $K_{s}$ band high-contrast coronagraphic imaging of the luminous debris disk around the nearby, young A star HD 32297 resolved at a projected separation of $r$ = 0.3-2.5\arcsec{} ($\approx$ 35-280 AU). The disk is highly warped to the north and exhibits a complex, "wavy" surface brightness profile interior to $r$ $\approx$ 110 AU, where the peaks/plateaus in the profiles are shifted between the NE and SW disk lobes. The SW side of the disk is 50--100% brighter at $r$ = 35-80 AU, and the location of its peak brightness roughly coincides with the disk's mm emission peak. Spectral energy distribution modeling suggests that HD 32297 has at least two dust populations that may originate from two separate belts likely at different locations, possibly at distances coinciding with the surface brightness peaks. A disk model for a single dust belt including a phase function with two components and a 5-10 AU pericenter offset explains the disk's warped structure and reproduces some of the surface brightness profile's shape (e.g. the overall "wavy" profile, the SB peak/plateau shifts) but more poorly reproduces the disk's brightness asymmetry. Although there may be alternate explanations, agreement between the SW disk brightness peak and disk's peak mm emission is consistent with an overdensity of very small, sub-blowout-sized dust and large, 0.1-1 mm-sized grains at $\approx$ 45 AU tracing the same parent population of planetesimals. New near-IR and submm observations may be able to clarify whether even more complex grain scattering properties or dynamical sculpting by an unseen planet are required to explain HD 32297's disk structure.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2012; 757(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An H2 emission filament is found in close proximity to the unique object KH 15D using the adaptive optics system of the Subaru Telescope. The morphology of the filament, the presence of spectroscopic outflow signatures observed by Hamilton et al., and the detection of extended H2 emission from KH 15D by Deming, Charbonneau, & Harrington suggest that this filament arises from shocked H2 in an outflow. The filament extends about 15'' to the north of KH 15D.
    The Astrophysical Journal 12/2008; 601(1):L91. · 6.73 Impact Factor