Janet M. Stoppard

University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada

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Publications (13)13.28 Total impact

  • Janet M. Stoppard
    Feminism & Psychology - FEM PSYCHOL. 01/2010; 20(2):267-271.
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty family physicians (11 female and 9 male) were interviewed about their experiences in treating depressed patients. Interview transcripts were analyzed thematically with respect to physicians' understanding of women's depression and their treatment strategies with depressed women. Stress arising in the social context of women's lives was perceived as a key precipitant of depression in women, with family-related, gender-specific and practical sources of stress as the main contributors. Physicians' treatment strategies had the aims of alleviating depressive symptoms and stress reduction. Implications of the findings for primary health care delivery and community-based interventions with depressed women are discussed.
    Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community 01/2008; 35(2):63-76.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Twenty family physicians (11 female and 9 male) were interviewed about their experiences in treating depressed patients. Interview transcripts were analyzed thematically with respect to physicians' understanding of women's depression and their treatment strategies with depressed women. Stress arising in the social context of women's lives was perceived as a key precipitant of depression in women, with family-related, gender-specific and practical sources of stress as the main contributors. Physicians' treatment strategies had the aims of alleviating depressive symptoms and stress reduction. Implications of the findings for primary health care delivery and community-based interventions with depressed women are discussed.
    Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community 01/2008; 35(2):63-76.
  • Linda M. McMullen, Janet M. Stoppard
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence of the burden of depression for women worldwide and of the link between depression and the economic and social conditions of women’s lives provides a firm grounding for feminist-informed understandings of depression. We focus on the conjunction of women and depression as a site for assessing the influence of feminism in Canadian psychology. On the basis of our analysis of two ‘fact sheets’ - one on depression and one on postpartum depression - that appear on the website of the Canadian Psychological Association, we conclude that feminist-informed understandings of depression are almost completely absent in the accounts of depression presented to the public. We explore reasons for the resistance to such understandings through reference to psychology’s reliance on individualist conceptions and to the contemporary climate in which Canadian clinical psychology is located.
    Feminism &amp Psychology 01/2006; 16(3):273-288. · 0.58 Impact Factor
  • Michelle N. Lafrance, Janet M. Stoppard
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    ABSTRACT: This study involved a discourse analytic investigation of 15 women’s accounts of their experiences of recovery from depression. Participants’ descriptions of depression revolved around their lives as women, consumed by domestic practices and governed by the needs of others. In contrast, recovery was constructed within a narrative of personal transformation in which participants relinquished their good woman practices and attended to their own needs. However, participants appeared to face a discursive double bind whereby letting go of domestic and caring work and beginning to care for themselves were both central to their wellness and threatening to their identities as women. The analysis explores the ways in which participants negotiated and resisted dominant discourses of femininity in their accounts of recovery from depression.
    Feminism &amp Psychology 01/2006; 16(3):307-325. · 0.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore and describe primary care physicians' experiences in providing care to depressed patients and to increase understanding of the possibilities and constraints around diagnosing and treating depression in primary care. Qualitative study using personal interviews. A hospital region in eastern Canada. A purposely diverse sample of 20 physicians chosen from among all 100 practising family physicians in the region. Invitations were mailed to all physicians practising in the region. Twenty physicians were chosen from among the 39 physicians responding positively to the invitation. Location of practice, sex, and year of graduation from medical school were used as sampling criteria. The 20 physicians were then interviewed, and the interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach involving handwritten notes on transcripts and themes created using qualitative data analysis software. Three themes related to diagnosis emerged. The first concerns use of checklists. Physicians said they needed an efficient but effective means of diagnosing depression and often used diagnostic aids, such as checklists. Some physicians, however, were reluctant to use such aids. The second theme, interpersonal processes, involved the investment of time needed for diagnosing depression and the importance of establishing rapport. The final theme, intuition, revealed how some physicians relied on "gut sense" and years of experience to make a diagnosis. Diagnosis of depression by primary care physicians involves a series of often complicated negotiations with patients. Such negotiations require expertise gained through experience, yet prior research has not recognized the intricacies of this diagnostic process. Our findings suggest that future research must recognize the complex and multidisciplinary nature of physicians' approaches to diagnosis of depression in order to better reflect how they practise.
    Canadian family physician Médecin de famille canadien 09/2005; 51:1102-3. · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • Roanne Thomas-MacLean, Janet M Stoppard
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    ABSTRACT: A qualitative study explored primary care physicians' experiences of diagnosing and treating depression. Twenty physicians participated in semi-structured interviews. Interview questions asked physicians to consider a range of topics such as the etiology of depression, the diagnostic process and treatment of depression. Transcripts were analyzed discursively with a view to exploring the ways in which physicians construct depression. In this article, physicians' constructions of depression are examined through exploration of their descriptions of this condition, as well as their recognition of the social context of depression. Based on this analysis, it was concluded that physicians' medicalized understandings of depression conflict with recognition of the social context of depression. The result of this conflict is dissonant descriptions of depression. One implication of this research is that physicians' training would benefit from the integration of multidisciplinary perspectives on depression, which would better reflect physicians' experiences in routine practice situations.
    Health 08/2004; 8(3):275-93. · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This qualitative research aims to understand, from the standpoint of the family physician, the barriers to treating depression in the office setting. Three primary barriers to treating depression in the family physician's office were identified: systemic, physician-related, and patient-related. The systemic barriers involved the shortage of qualified, publicly-funded counsellors, lack of locally available counselling, and the cost of medication. Physician-related barriers included lack of time and expertise, and inadequacies of the reimbursement system. Patient-related barriers were rooted in the stigma attached to depression and failure to comply with treatment.
    Canadian journal of community mental health = Revue canadienne de santé mentale communautaire 02/2004; 23(1):37-46.
  • Jaclyn A Hetherington, Janet M Stoppard
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    ABSTRACT: Fourteen adolescent girls aged between 14 and 17 were interviewed concerning their understanding of depression. Individual interviews were semi-structured and included discussion about descriptions of, causes of, and coping with, depression. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and were analysed thematically. The dominant theme arising from the girls' interviews was that of disconnection from relationships. Possible reasons why disconnection seems to play such a large part in girls' understanding of depression are discussed.
    Journal of Adolescence 01/2003; 25(6):619-29. · 2.05 Impact Factor
  • Janet Stoppard
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    ABSTRACT: A recent survey of qualitative researchers in Canada by D. L. Rennie et al. (2000) found that few academic psychologists engage in qualitative research. This article begins with a description of the author's decision to develop a graduate course on qualitative research methods and then goes on to explore resistance and receptivity to qualitative research in three areas: the impact of the course on students; the reactions of faculty to attempts by students to introduce qualitative methods into their work; and the curriculum revision process. Based on the author's experience of teaching the course over several years, strategies are suggested for surviving (and perhaps thriving) in academic environments that are somewhat inhospitable to qualitative approaches. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Canadian Psychology 07/2002; 43(3):143-153. · 1.54 Impact Factor
  • Janet M. Stoppard
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    ABSTRACT: Analyzes limitations of the currently dominant, or mainstream, approaches to understanding and explaining "depression" in women. The often-cited finding that "depression" is a problem particularly afflicting women is one that mainstream theoretical approaches have been unable to explain satisfactorily. Such theories have been critiqued as inherently dualist and reductionist and as employing concepts that are implicitly androcentric. Mainstream theories promote a view of depression as a form of individual disorder or psychopathology, capable of being understood without regard to the broader sociocultural context. Neglected within mainstream theory and research on depression are social-structural and discursive conditions that regulate women's lives and shape their experiences. Research informed by feminist standpoint and social constructionist epistemological perspectives provides one avenue for offsetting the limitations of mainstream approaches. At this juncture, forms of inquiry drawing on qualitative methodologies offer more useful, and potentially more emancipatory, strategies for understanding depression in women than mainstream approaches, because they can more fully acknowledge the lived experiences of women. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Canadian Psychology 04/1999; 40(2):79-90. · 1.54 Impact Factor
  • Yvette Scattolon, Janet M. Stoppard
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    ABSTRACT: Explored women's experiences of depression, and in particular how women living in rural communities understand, experience, and cope with feelings of distress unaided by professional help. Participants were 15 women (aged 23–60 yrs) living in rural areas of central New Brunswick who completed a semistructured interview. The purpose of the interview was to explore their experiences of depression and their ways of coping with these experiences. The women's accounts were analyzed using thematic and discourse analysis methods. A central theme revealed in the analysis was that women's understanding of their experiences was interwoven with their attempts to live up to the ideals and practices of the "good" woman. Within this context, depressive experiences were viewed as a taken-for-granted or expected part of their everyday lives. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Canadian Psychology 04/1999; 40(2):205-219. · 1.54 Impact Factor
  • Deanna J. Gammell, Janet M. Stoppard
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    ABSTRACT: An interview study was conducted in which women's experiences of diagnosis and treatment for depression were explored. Nine women (aged 19–66 yrs) who had been diagnosed by a physician participated in the study. Topics explored in the interview included how women came to be diagnosed as depressed, how treatment was experienced, how they understood the causes of their depression, and how being diagnosed had affected their view of themselves and their futures. Analysis involved a thematic approach guided by the topics addressed in the interview. The women's accounts also were analyzed with respect to the themes of medicalization and empowerment. All of the participants gave medicalized accounts of their depressive experiences, which were characterized by biomedical explanations and identification of anti-depressant drugs as beneficial in alleviating their distress. Based on this analysis of the women's accounts, it is concluded that a medicalized understanding and treatment of women's depressive experiences cannot readily co-exist with personal empowerment. Suggestions are made for developing strategies for treatment of women's depressive experiences that offer the benefits of medicalization without precluding the possibility of personal empowerment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Canadian Psychology 04/1999; 40(2):112-128. · 1.54 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

103 Citations
13.28 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003–2008
    • University of New Brunswick
      • Department of Psychology
      Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada
  • 2004–2005
    • University of Saskatchewan
      • Department of Sociology
      Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    • Dalhousie University
      • Department of Family Medicine
      Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada