R. G. Abraham

Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Arching, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (159)662.43 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Most massive passive galaxies are compact at high redshifts, but similarly compact massive galaxies are rare in the local universe. The most common interpretation of this phenomenon is that massive galaxies have grown in size by a factor of about five since redshift z=2. An alternative explanation is that recently quenched massive galaxies are larger (a "progenitor bias"). In this paper we explore the importance of progenitor bias by looking for systematic differences in the stellar populations of compact early-type galaxies in the DEEP2 survey as a function of size. Our analysis is based on applying the statistical technique of bootstrap resampling to constrain differences in the median ages of our samples and to begin to characterize the distribution of stellar populations in our co-added spectra. The light-weighted ages of compact early-type galaxies at redshifts 0.5 < z < 1.4 are compared to those of a control sample of larger galaxies at similar redshifts. We find that massive compact early-type galaxies selected on the basis of red color and high bulge-to-total ratio are younger than similarly selected larger galaxies, suggesting that size growth in these objects is not driven mainly by progenitor bias, and that individual galaxies grow as their stellar populations age. However, compact early-type galaxies selected on the basis of image smoothness and high bulge-to-total ratio are older than a control sample of larger galaxies. Progenitor bias will play a significant role in defining the apparent size changes of early-type galaxies if they are selected on the basis of the smoothness of their light distributions.
    11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In this letter we report the discovery of CO fluxes, suggesting very high gas fractions in three disk galaxies seen in the nearby Universe (z ~ 0.1). These galaxies were investigated as part of the DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of these objects reveals the presence of large star forming clumps in the bodies of the galaxies, while spatially resolved spectroscopy of redshifted Halpha reveals the presence of high dispersion rotating disks. The internal dynamical state of these galaxies resembles that of disk systems seen at much higher redshifts (1 < z < 3). Using CO(1-0) observations made with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, we find gas fractions of 20-30% and depletion times of tdep ~ 0.5 Gyr (assuming a Milky Way-like CO conversion factor). These properties are unlike those expected for low- redshift galaxies of comparable specific star formation rate, but they are normal for their high-z counterparts. DYNAMO galaxies break the degeneracy between gas fraction and redshift, and we show that the depletion time per specific star formation rate for galaxies is closely tied to gas fraction, independent of redshift. We also show that the gas dynamics of two of our local targets corresponds to those expected from unstable disks, again resembling the dynamics of high-z disks. These results provide evidence that DYNAMO galaxies are local analogues to the clumpy, turbulent disks, which are often found at high redshift.
    The Astrophysical Journal Letters 05/2014; 790(2). · 6.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We study the spatially resolved stellar kinematics of two star-forming galaxies at z = 0.1 from the larger DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) sample. These galaxies, which have been characterized by high levels of star formation and large ionized gas velocity dispersions, are considered possible analogs to high-redshift clumpy disks. They were observed using the GMOS instrument in integral field spectroscopy (IFS) mode at the Gemini Observatory with high spectral resolution (R=5400, equivalent to 24 km/s at the observed wavelengths) and 6 hour exposure times in order to measure the resolved stellar kinematics via absorption lines. We also obtain higher-quality emission line kinematics than previous observations. The spatial resolution (1.2 kpc) is sufficient to show that the ionized gas in these galaxies (as traced by H-beta emission) is morphologically irregular, forming multiple giant clumps while stellar continuum light is smooth and well described by an exponential profile. Clumpy gas morphologies observed in IFS data are confirmed by complementary narrow band H-alpha imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope. Morphological differences between the stars and ionized gas are not reflected dynamically as stellar kinematics are found the be closely coupled to the kinematics of the ionized gas: both components are smoothly rotating with large velocity dispersions (~40 km/s) suggesting that the high gas dispersions are not primarily driven by star-formation feedback. In addition, the stellar population ages of these galaxies are estimated to be quite young (60-500 Myr). The large velocity dispersions measured for these young stars suggest that we are seeing the formation of thick disks and/or stellar bulges in support of recent models which produce these from clumpy galaxies at high redshift.
    05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: (abridged) DYNAMO is a multi-wavelength, spatially-resolved survey of local ($z \sim 0.1$) star-forming galaxies designed to study evolution through comparison with samples at z~2. Half of the sample has integrated H-alpha luminosities of >$10^{42}$ erg/s, the typical lower limit for resolved spectroscopy at z~2. The sample covers a range in stellar mass ($10^9$-$10^{11}$ Msun) and star-formation rate (0.2-100 Msun/yr). In this first paper of a series, we present integral-field spectroscopy of H-alpha emission for the sample of 67 galaxies. We infer gas fractions in our sample as high as ~0.8, higher than typical for local galaxies. Gas fraction correlates with stellar mass in galaxies with star-formation rates below 10 Msun/yr, as found by COLDGASS, but galaxies with higher star-formation rates have higher than expected gas fractions. There is only a weak correlation, if any, between gas fraction and gas velocity dispersion. Galaxies in the sample visually classified as disc-like are offset from the local stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relation to higher circular velocities, but this offset vanishes when both gas and stars are included in the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. The mean gas velocity dispersion of the sample is ~50 km/s, and V/sigma ranges from 2 to 10 for most of the discs, similar to 'turbulent' galaxies at high redshift. Half of our sample show disc-like rotation, while ~20 percent show no signs of rotation. The division between rotating and non-rotating is approximately...
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 10/2013; 437(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) aboard the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will offer wide-field slitless spectroscopy (WFSS) with a resolving power R = 150 over the wavelength range 0.8 to 2.25 microns. In this band, NIRISS will be sensitive to Lyman-alpha emission from galaxies with redshifts 6 < z < 17. To explore its ability to observe such high-redshift galaxies, we have modeled a NIRISS observation of the massive galaxy cluster MACS J0647+7015. Using published images, photometry, and redshifts from the CLASH survey, we constructed a series of simulated direct and dispersed images in the six filters used for WFSS with NIRISS. To each image were added 180 high-redshift galaxies distributed uniformly in space, redshift, and magnitude. Using Source Extractor, we identified 7200 galaxies in the F200W direct image, including 165 of the high-redshift sources (the remainder were lost to bright foreground objects). From this catalog, we selected 1000 objects, including all 165 of the high-redshift sources. We performed photometry of these 1000 sources in each direct image and extracted their spectra (using the aXe software package) from each dispersed image. A subset of our team was given these data and asked to identify the high-redshift galaxies. We will present the results of this analysis and discuss their implications for the ability of NIRISS to detect and parameterize high-redshift galaxies in crowded fields. NIRISS is provided to the JWST project by the Canadian Space Agency under the leadership of René Doyon of the Université de Montréal. The prime contractor is COM DEV Canada.
    06/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous M_r<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5<r<17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04<z<0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g. streams, shells and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g. major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame colour and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10^10.5 M_sun, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.
    The Astrophysical Journal 01/2013; 765(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    Richard C. Y. Chou, Carrie R. Bridge, Roberto G. Abraham
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    ABSTRACT: We have studied the kinematics of ~2800 candidate close pair galaxies at 0.1<z<1.2 identified from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey fields. Spectra of these systems were obtained using spectrometers on the 6.5m Magellan and 5m Hale telescopes. These data allow us to constrain the rate of dry mergers at intermediate redshifts and to test the `hot halo' model for quenching of star formation. Using virial radii estimated from the correlation between dynamical and stellar masses published by Leauthaud et al. (2011), we find that around 1/5 of our candidate pairs are likely to share a common dark matter halo (our metric for close physical association). These pairs are divided into red-red, blue-red and blue-blue systems using the rest-frame colors classification method introduced in Chou et al. (2011). Galaxies classified as red in our sample have very low star-formation rates, but they need not be totally quiescent, and hence we refer to them as `damp', rather than `dry', systems. After correcting for known selection effects, the fraction of blue-blue pairs is significantly greater than that of red-red and blue-red pairs. Red-red pairs are almost entirely absent from our sample, suggesting that damp mergers are rare at z~0.5. Our data supports models with a short merging timescale (<0.5 Gyr) in which star-formation is enhanced in the early phase of mergers, but quenched in the late phase. Hot halo models may explain this behaviour, but only if virial shocks that heat gas are inefficient until major mergers are nearly complete.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2012; 760(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) is one of the four science instruments on board the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). FGS features two modules: an infrared camera dedicated to fine guiding of the observatory and a science camera module, the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) covering the wavelength range between 0.7 and 5.0 μm with a field of view of 2.2' X 2.2'. NIRISS has four observing modes: 1) broadband imaging featuring seven of the eight NIRCam broadband filters, 2) wide-field slitless spectroscopy at a resolving power of rv150 between 1 and 2.5 μm, 3) single-object cross-dispersed slitless spectroscopy enabling simultaneous wavelength coverage between 0. 7 and 2.5 μm at Rrv660, a mode optimized for transit spectroscopy of relatively bright (J > 7) stars and, 4) sparse aperture interferometric imaging between 3.8 and 4.8 μm enabling high­ contrast ("' 10-4) imaging of M < 8 point sources at angular separations between 70 and 500 milliarcsec. This paper presents an overview of the FGS/NIRISS design with a focus on the scientific capabilities and performance offered by NIRISS.
    Proc SPIE 09/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: We present observational evidence for the inhibition of bar formation in dispersion-dominated (dynamically hot) galaxies by studying the relationship between galactic structure and host galaxy kinematics in a sample of 257 galaxies between 0.1 $<$ z $\leq$ 0.84 from the All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) and the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) survey. We find that bars are preferentially found in galaxies that are massive and dynamically cold (rotation-dominated) and on the stellar Tully-Fisher relationship, as is the case for barred spirals in the local Universe. The data provide at least one explanation for the steep ($\times$3) decline in the overall bar fraction from z=0 to z=0.84 in L$^*$ and brighter disks seen in previous studies. The decline in the bar fraction at high redshift is almost exclusively in the lower mass (10 $<$ log M$_{*}$(\Msun)$<$ 11), later-type and bluer galaxies. A proposed explanation for this "downsizing" of the bar formation / stellar structure formation is that the lower mass galaxies may not form bars because they could be dynamically hotter than more massive systems from the increased turbulence of accreting gas, elevated star formation, and/or increased interaction/merger rate at higher redshifts. The evidence presented here provides observational support for this hypothesis. However, the data also show that not every disk galaxy that is massive and cold has a stellar bar, suggesting that mass and dynamic coldness of a disk are necessary but not sufficient conditions for bar formation -- a secondary process, perhaps the interaction history between the dark matter halo and the baryonic matter, may play an important role in bar formation.
    The Astrophysical Journal 08/2012; 758(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent deep Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 imaging suggests that a majority of compact quiescent massive galaxies at z~2 may contain disks. To investigate this claim, we have compared the ellipticity distribution of 31 carefully selected high-redshift massive quiescent compact galaxies to a set of mass-selected ellipticity and Sersic index distributions obtained from 2D structural fits to ~40,000$ nearby galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the distribution of ellipticities for the high-redshift galaxies is consistent with the ellipticity distribution of a similarly chosen sample of massive early-type galaxies. However the distribution of Sersic indices for the high-redshift sample is inconsistent with that of local early-type galaxies, and instead resembles that of local disk-dominated populations. The mismatch between the properties of high-redshift compact galaxies and those of both local early-type and disk-dominated systems leads us to conclude that the basic structures of high-redshift compact galaxies probably do not closely resemble those of any single local galaxy population. Any galaxy population analog to the high-redshift compact galaxies that exists at the current epoch is either a mix of different types of galaxies, or possibly a unique class of objects on their own.
    The Astrophysical Journal Letters 06/2012; 754(2). · 6.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the first observational evidence for the inhibition of bar formation in dispersion dominated (dynamically hot) galaxies. We compare the presence of galactic structures (bars) and the host galaxy kinematics in a sample of 200 disk galaxies from the All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) and the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) survey. We find that bars are preferentially found in galaxies that lie on the Tully-Fisher relationship and are rotation-dominated, whereas few bars are found in galaxies that are dispersion dominated. The data provide at least one explanation for the steep (x3) decline in the bar fraction from z=0 to z=0.84 previously observed in L* disk galaxies in the COSMOS field. In the COSMOS data, the decline in bars is primarily found in the low mass, late-type systems. A proposed explanation for the trend was that at higher redshifts, lower mass systems were more dispersion dominated because they were more easily harassed by the increased interaction and merger rate. The data presented here provides observational support for this hypothesis.
    05/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: We present an analysis of the size growth seen in early-type galaxies over 10 Gyr of cosmic time. Our analysis is based on a homogeneous synthesis of published data from 17 spectroscopic surveys observed at similar spatial resolution, augmented by new measurements for galaxies in the Gemini Deep Deep Survey. In total, our sample contains structural data for 465 galaxies (mainly early-type) in the redshift range 0.2<z<2.7. The size evolution of passively-evolving galaxies over this redshift range is gradual and continuous, with no evidence for an end or change to the process around z~1, as has been hinted at by some surveys which analyze subsets of the data in isolation. The size growth appears to be independent of stellar mass, with the mass-normalized half-light radius scaling with redshift as R_e (1+z)^(-1.62 +/- 0.34). Surprisingly, this power law seems to be in good agreement with the recently reported continuous size evolution of UV-bright galaxies in the redshift range z~0.5-3.5. It is also in accordance with the predictions from recent theoretical models.
    The Astrophysical Journal Letters 08/2011; 739(2). · 6.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we present the coordinates of 67 55' x 55' patches of sky which have the rare combination of both high stellar surface density (>0.5 arcmin^{-2} with 13<R<16.5 mag) and low extinction (E(B-V)<0.1). These fields are ideal for adaptive-optics based follow-up of extragalactic targets. One region of sky, situated near Baade's Window, contains most of the patches we have identified. Our optimal field, centered at RA: 7h24m3s, Dec: -1deg27'15", has an additional advantage of being accessible from both hemispheres. We propose a figure of merit for quantifying real-world adaptive optics performance, and use this to analyze the performance of multi-conjugate adaptive optics in these fields. We also compare our results to those that would be obtained in existing deep fields. In some cases adaptive optics observations undertaken in the fields given in this paper would be orders of magnitude more efficient than equivalent observations undertaken in existing deep fields.
    Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 01/2011; 123. · 3.69 Impact Factor
  • Roberto G. Abraham
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    ABSTRACT: In keeping with the spirit of a meeting on ‘masks,’ this talk presents two short stories on the theme of dust. In the first, dust plays the familiar role of the evil obscurer, the enemy to bedefeated by the cunning observer in order to allow a key future technology (adaptive optics) to be exploited fully by heroic astronomers. In the second story, dust itself emerges as the improbable hero, in the form of a circumstellar debris disks. I will present evidence of a puzzling near-infrared excess in the continuum of high-redshift galaxies and will argue that the seemingly improbable origin of this IR excess is a population of young circumstellar disks formed around high-mass stars in distant galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses,as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems in distant galaxies at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.
    12/2010: pages 409-424;
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    Richard C. Y. Chou, Carrie R. Bridge, Roberto G. Abraham
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    ABSTRACT: We analyze 1298 merging galaxies with redshifts up to z=0.7 from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, taken from the catalog presented in Bridge et al. (2010). By analyzing the internal colors of these systems, we show that so-called wet and dry mergers evolve in different senses, and quantify the space densities of these systems. The local space density of wet mergers is essentially dentical to the local space density of dry mergers. The evolution in the total merger rate is modest out to z ~ 0.7, although the wet and dry populations have different evolutionary trends. At higher redshifts dry mergers make a smaller contribution to the total merging galaxy population, but this is offset by a roughly equivalent increase in the contribution from wet mergers. By comparing the mass density function of early-type galaxies to the corresponding mass density function for merging systems, we show that not all the major mergers with the highest masses (M_stellar > 10^11 M_solar) will end up with the most massive early-type galaxies, unless the merging timescale is dramatically longer than that usually assumed. On the other hand, the usually-assumed merging timescale of ~ 0.5-1 Gyr is quite consistent with the data if we suppose that only less massive early-type galaxies form via mergers. Since low-intermediate mass ellipticals are 10 --100 times more common than their most massive counterparts, the hierarchical explanation for the origin of early-type galaxies may be correct for the vast majority of early-types, even if incorrect for the most massive ones. Comment: 10 pages, 8 figures. Accepted by AJ
    The Astronomical Journal 12/2010; · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    Erin Mentuch, Roberto G. Abraham, Stefano Zibetti
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    ABSTRACT: We have measured the near-infrared colors and the fluxes of individual pixels in 68 galaxies common to the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey and the Large Galaxy Atlas Survey. Pixels from each galaxy are grouped into regions of increasingly red near-infrared colors. As expected, the majority of pixels are shown to have relatively constant NIR flux ratios (log10 I3.6/I1.25 = –0.30 ± 0.07 and log10 I4.5/I3.6 = –0.19 ± 0.02), representing the blackbody continuum emission of main sequence stars. However, pixels with red NIR colors correspond to pixels with higher Hα emission and dust extinction. We show that the NIR colors are correlated to both quantities, with the strongest correlation to the intrinsic Hα emission. In addition, in regions of high star formation, the average intensity of pixels in red-excess regions (at 1.25 μm, 3.6 μm, 4.5 μm, 5.6 μm, 8.0 μm and 24 μm) scales linearly with the intrinsic intensity of Hα emission, and thus with the star formation rate (SFR) within the pixel. This suggests that most NIR-excess regions are not red because their light is being depleted by absorption. Instead, they are red because additional infrared light is being contributed by a process linked to star formation. This is surprising because the shorter wavelength bands in our study (1.25 μm-5.6 μm) do not probe emission from cold (10-20 K) and warm (50-100 K) dust associated with star formation in molecular clouds. However, emission from hot dust (700-1000 K) and/or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules can explain the additional emission seen at the shorter wavelengths in our study. The contribution from hot dust and/or PAH emission at 2 μm-5 μm and PAH emission at 5.6 μm and 8.0 μm scales linearly with warm dust emission at 24 μm and the intrinsic Hα emission. Since both are tied to the SFR, our analysis shows that the NIR excess continuum emission and PAH emission at ~1-8 μm can be added to spectral energy distribution models in a very straightforward way, by simply adding an additional component to the models that scales linearly with SFR.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2010; · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Observations of star formation and kinematics in early galaxies at high spatial and spectral resolution have shown that two-thirds are massive rotating disk galaxies, with the remainder being less massive non-rotating objects. The line-of-sight-averaged velocity dispersions are typically five times higher than in today's disk galaxies. This suggests that gravitationally unstable, gas-rich disks in the early Universe are fuelled by cold, dense accreting gas flowing along cosmic filaments and penetrating hot galactic gas halos. These accreting flows, however, have not been observed, and cosmic accretion cannot power the observed level of turbulence. Here we report observations of a sample of rare, high-velocity-dispersion disk galaxies in the nearby Universe where cold accretion is unlikely to drive their high star formation rates. We find that their velocity dispersions are correlated with their star formation rates, but not their masses or gas fractions, which suggests that star formation is the energetic driver of galaxy disk turbulence at all cosmic epochs.
    Nature 10/2010; 467(7316):684-6. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    Preethi B. Nair, Sidney van den Bergh, Roberto G. Abraham
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    ABSTRACT: We have examined the luminosity-size relationship as a function of environment for 12150 SDSS galaxies with precise visual classifications from the catalog of Nair & Abraham (2010a). Our analysis is subdivided into investigations of early-type galaxies and late-type galaxies. Early-type galaxies reveal a surprisingly tight luminosity-size relation. The dispersion in luminosity about the fiducial relation is only ~0.14 dex (0.35 mag), even though the sample contains galaxies which differ by a factor of almost 100 in luminosity. The dispersion about the luminosity-size relation is comparable to the dispersion about the fundamental plane, even though the luminosity-size relation is fundamentally simpler and computed using purely photometric parameters. The key contributors to the dispersion about the luminosity-size relation are found to be color and central concentration. Expanding our analysis to the full range of morphological types, we show that the slope, zero point, and scatter about the luminosity-size relation is independent of environmental density. Our study thus indicates that whatever process is building galaxies is doing so in a way that preserves fundamental scaling laws even as the typical luminosity of galaxies changes with environment. However, the distribution of galaxies along the luminosity-size relation is found to be strongly dependent on galaxy environment. This variation is in the sense that, at a given morphology, larger and more luminous galaxies are rarer in sparser environments. Our analysis of late-type galaxy morphologies reveals that scatter increases towards later Hubble types. Taken together, these results place strong constraints on conventional hierarchical models in which galaxies are built up in an essentially stochastic way. Comment: 20 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables, Submitted Nov 5, 2009; Accepted by ApJ April 6, 2010 Higher resolution versions of the figures can be found at: http://www.bo.astro.it/~nair/Morphology/
    The Astrophysical Journal 04/2010; · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    Preethi B. Nair, Roberto G. Abraham
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the stellar masses of strongly barred spiral galaxies. Our analysis is based on a sample of ~14000 visually-classified nearby galaxies given in Nair & Abraham 2010(a). The fraction of barred spiral galaxies is found to be a strong function of stellar mass and star formation history, with a minimum near the characteristic mass at which bimodality is seen in the stellar populations of galaxies. We also find bar fractions are very sensitive to the central concentration of galaxies below the transition mass but not above it. This suggests that whatever process is causing the creation of the red and blue sequences is either influencing, or being influenced by, structural changes which manifest themselves in the absence of bars. As a consequence of strong bar fractions being sensitive to the mass range probed, our analysis helps resolve discrepant results on the reported evolution of bar fractions with redshift. Comment: 5 pages, 5 figures, Submitted June 16, 2009, Accepted by ApJL April 6, 2010
    The Astrophysical Journal Letters 04/2010; · 6.35 Impact Factor
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    Preethi B. Nair, Roberto G. Abraham
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    ABSTRACT: We present a catalog of detailed visual classifications for 14034 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 4 (DR4). Our sample includes nearly all spectroscopically-targeted galaxies in the redshift range 0.01<z<0.1 down to an apparent extinction-corrected limit of g<16 mag. In addition to T-Types we record the existence of bars, rings, lenses, tails, warps, dust lanes, arm flocculence and multiplicity. This sample defines a comprehensive local galaxy sample which we will use in future papers to study low redshift morphology. It will also prove useful for calibrating automated galaxy classification algorithms. In this paper we describe the classification methodology used, detail the systematics and biases of our sample and summarize the overall statistical properties of the sample, noting the most obvious trends that are relevant for general comparisons of our catalog with previously published work. Comment: 32 pages, 28 figures, 4 tables, 1 online table, Accepted by ApJ Supplement Series
    The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 01/2010; · 16.24 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
662.43 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics
      Arching, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1994–2013
    • University of Toronto
      • Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2008
    • San Francisco State University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      San Francisco, CA, United States
  • 2007
    • Carnegie Institution for Science
      Washington, West Virginia, United States
  • 2003–2004
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Baltimore, MD, United States
  • 1996–2002
    • University of Cambridge
      • Institute of Astronomy
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 1998
    • University of Colorado at Boulder
      • Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy
      Boulder, Colorado, United States
  • 1991–1998
    • University of Southampton
      • Faculty of Physical and Applied Sciences
      Southampton, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 1997
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1993
    • Government of British Columbia, Canada
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada