Atitada Boonpraderm

Mahidol University, Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand

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Publications (12)22.49 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the present study, we investigated nutritional status and health-related factors in a multistage cluster sample of 3119 Thai urban and rural children aged 0·5–12·9 years. In a subsample, blood samples were collected for the measurement of Hb, transferrin receptor, vitamin A and vitamin D concentrations. The prevalence of stunting and underweight was higher in rural children than in urban children, whereas the wasting rate was similar in both rural and urban areas. Among children aged 3·0–5·9 years, the prevalence of overweight was significantly higher in urban areas than in rural areas and so was the obesity rate in children aged 6·0–12·9 years. Protein intakes of all age groups were relatively high in both the areas. Intakes of Ca, Fe, Zn and vitamin C were significantly higher in urban areas than in rural areas. The prevalence of anaemia in rural areas was twice as high as that in urban areas, particularly in infants and young children. However, the prevalence of Fe-deficiency anaemia was similar in both urban and rural areas. While the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (by serum retinol cut-off < 0·7 μmol/l) seemed to be very low, vitamin A insufficiency (by serum retinol cut-off < 1·05 μmol/l) was more prevalent (29·4–31·7 %) in both the areas. The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency ranged between 27·7 and 45·6 % among the children. The present study indicates that the double burden of malnutrition is still a major public health problem in Thailand. Further studies need to explore the associated risk factors for these nutrient deficiencies. Effective strategies and actions are needed to tackle the nutritional problems in Thai children.
    The British journal of nutrition 09/2013; 110(S3). · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the relationship between dietary intake, body weight, and body mass index (BMI) in adult Thais as a function of smoking status. A cross-sectional, nationally representative survey using health and dietary questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were used. Participants were 7858 Thai adults aged 18 years and older recruited from 17 provinces inThailand. RESULTS: demonstrated that smoking is associated with lower weights and BMI. However, when smokers were stratified by smoking intensity, there was no dose-response relationship between smoking and body weight. There is no conclusive explanation for weight differences across smoking groups in this sample, and the results of the present study did not clearly support any of the purported mechanisms for the differences in body weight or BMI. In addition, because the substantial negative health consequences of smoking are far stronger than those associated with modest weight differences, smoking cannot be viewed as an appropriate weight management strategy.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 12/2011; · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Overweight and obesity are considered a serious health problem in Thailand. This study examined the prevalence of overweight and obesity in a nationally representative sample of Thai children and adults based on international standards. A cross-sectional population survey of 16,596 Thais aged 3 years and over was conducted. Heights and weights were obtained using standardized methods. Estimates of the overweight and obesity prevalence in children, adolescents, and adults were computed. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among children and adolescents aged 3 to 18 years was 7.6% and 9.0%, respectively, and was higher among boys than girls. Among adults, using the the Regional Office for the Western Pacific (WPRO) standard, 17.1% of adults were classified as overweight [body mass index (BMI) 23.0-24.9 kg/m²], 19.0% as class I obesity (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m²), and 4.8% as class II obesity (BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m²). Using the World Health Organization (WHO) definition, 19.0% were overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m²), 4.0% class I obesity (BMI 30.0-34.9 kg/m²), 0.8% class II obesity (BMI 35.0-39.9 kg/m²), and 0.1% class III obesity (BMI ≥ 40.0 kg/m²). There was a vast difference in obesity prevalence between the WHO and the WPRO criteria. Obesity prevalence when using the WPRO definition (23.8%) was almost five times greater than when defined with the WHO standard (4.9%). The present study found a high prevalence of overweight and obesity in nationally representative sample of the Thai population. Higher rates of overweight and obesity prevalence were computed using the WPRO standard when compared to the WHO standard.
    Eating and weight disorders: EWD 12/2011; 16(4):e242-9. · 0.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors examined the relationship between socioeconomic status and smoking in Thai adults. A nationally representative sample of 7858 Thais adults (18 years and older) was surveyed during 2004 to 2005. Four demographic/socioeconomic indicators were examined in logistic models: gender, education, occupational status, and annual household income. Overall, 22.2% of the participants were smokers. Men were more likely to be smokers across all age groups and regions. Compared with nonsmokers, current smokers were less educated, more likely to be employed, but had lower household income. When stratified by gender, education and job levels were strongly associated with smoking prevalence among males. A significant relationship was found between annual household income and smoking. Those who lived under the poverty line were more likely to smoke than persons who lived above the poverty line in both genders. The present study demonstrated that socioeconomic factors, especially education level and occupational class, have a strong influence on smoking behavior in Thai adults.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 05/2010; 23(5):672-81. · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spices and herbs are rich in polyphenols and widely used in habitual diets in the tropical regions. To elucidate their effects on human health, intake of the portion of spices and herbs from habitual diets should be determined. Consumption patterns were determined from 24-hour records or recalls of 181 men and 370 women in Khonkaen and Ubon Ratchathani provinces, representing upper and lower northeast Thailand. There was a slight variation in dishes, but twelve spices/herbs were commonly used in the two areas. The amounts of spices/ herbs in the four most common dishes (Somtum, Jaew, Pon and Kang-Nor-Mai) were estimated by weighing ingredients before and after cooking. The average amount of spices/herbs consumed was 4.9, 26.1, 14 and 11 g/meal, contributing 36.6, 43.1, 20.6 and 29.8 mg polyphenols/meal for Somtum, Jaew, Pon and Kang- Nor-Mai, respectively. Chili was common in all recipes, with an average amount of 8.3-27.5 mg polyphenols/meal. In conclusion, habitual northeast Thai diets contain several spices/herbs and a substantial amount of polyphenols was commonly consumed.
    Malaysian Journal of Nutrition 04/2010; 16(1):137-48.
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the associations between overweight and obesity and socio-economic status (SES), behavioral factors, and dietary intake in Thai adults. A nationally representative sample of 6,445 Thais adults (18-70 years) was surveyed during 2004-2005. Information including demographics, SES characteristics, dietary intake, and anthropometrics were obtained. Overall, 35.0% of men, and 44.9% of women were overweight or obese (BMI ≥ 23 kg/m2) using the Asian cut-points. Regression models demonstrated that age was positively associated with being overweight in both genders. In gender-stratified analyses, male respondents who were older, lived in urban areas, had higher annual household income, and did not smoke were more likely to be classified as overweight and obese. Women who were older, had higher education, were not in a marriage-like relationship and were in semi-professional occupation were at greater risk for being overweight and obese. High carbohydrate and protein intake were found to be positively associated with BMI whereas the frequent use of dairy foods was found to be negatively associated with BMI among men. The present study found that SES factors are associated with being classified as overweight and obese in Thai adults, but associations were different between genders. Health promotion strategies regarding obesity and its related co-morbidity are necessary.
    Nutrients 03/2010; 2(1):60-74. · 3.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evaluate dietary intake, physical activity, and BMI in adult Thais stratified by smoking status, living in the central region of Thailand. Participants (n = 1,027) were administered a health questionnaires, 24-h dietary recall, and anthropometric measurements were obtained. Compared to ex-smokers (24.5 +/- 4.3 kg/m2) and non-smokers (24.8 +/- 4.0 kg/m2), current smokers (22.6 +/- 3.8 kg/m2) had significantly lower BMIs, regardless of gender (p < 0.001). In addition, male smokers had smaller waist circumferences than non-smokers. There were no statistically significant differences in nutrient intake or physical activity based on smoking status. Results from this study are consistent with others reports showing that smoking is associated with lower weights and BMI when compared to non-smokers. The mechanism for this association may be related to the potential for nicotine to increase metabolic rate rather than appetite suppression in smokers. Because the substantial negative health consequences of smoking are far stronger than those associated with modest weight differences, smoking cannot be viewed as an appropriate weight management strategy.
    Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet 07/2008; 91(7):1109-16.
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    ABSTRACT: Iron deficiency is prevalent in children and infants worldwide. Zinc deficiency may be prevalent, but data are lacking. Both iron and zinc deficiency negatively affect growth and psychomotor development. Combined iron and zinc supplementation might be beneficial, but the potential interactions need to be verified. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial using 2 x 2 factorial design, 609 Thai infants aged 4-6 mo were supplemented daily with 10 mg of iron and/or 10 mg of zinc for 6 mo to investigate effects and interactions on micronutrient status and growth. Iron supplementation alone increased hemoglobin and ferritin concentrations more than iron and zinc combined. Anemia prevalence was significantly lower in infants receiving only iron than in infants receiving iron and zinc combined. Baseline iron deficiency was very low, and iron deficiency anemia was almost nil. After supplementation, prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia were significantly higher in infants receiving placebo and zinc than in those receiving iron or iron and zinc. Serum zinc was higher in infants receiving zinc (16.7 +/- 5.2 micromol/L), iron and zinc (12.1 +/- 3.8 micromol/L) or iron alone (11.5 +/- 2.5 micromol/L) than in the placebo group (9.8 +/- 1.9 micromol/L). Iron and zinc interacted to affect iron and zinc status, but not hemoglobin. Iron supplementation had a small but significant effect on ponderal growth, whereas zinc supplementation did not. To conclude, in Thai infants, iron supplementation improved hemoglobin, iron status, and ponderal growth, whereas zinc supplementation improved zinc status. Overall, for infants, combined iron and zinc supplementation is preferable to iron or zinc supplementation alone.
    Journal of Nutrition 10/2006; 136(9):2405-11. · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anemia and co-existing deficiencies of zinc, iron, iodine, and vitamin A occur among children in many developing countries including NE Thailand, probably contributing to impairments in growth, immune competence, and cognition. Sustainable strategies are urgently required to combat these deficiencies. We assessed the efficacy of a micronutrient-fortified seasoning powder served with a school lunch on reducing anemia and improving the micronutrient status of rural NE Thai children. Children (n = 569) aged 5.5-13.4y from 10 schools were randomly assigned to receive a seasoning powder either unfortified or fortified with zinc (5 mg), iron (5 mg), vitamin A (270 microg), and iodine (50 microg) (per serving) and incorporated into a school lunch prepared centrally and delivered 5 d/wk for 31 wk. Teachers monitored school lunch consumption. Baseline and final micronutrient status, hemoglobinopathies, and infection or inflammation were assessed from blood and urine samples. For the primary outcome, anemia (based on hemoglobin), no intervention effect was apparent (odds ratio: 1.02 95% CI: 0.69, 1.51) after adjustment for design strata. The odds of zinc (based on serum zinc) and urinary iodine deficiency in the fortified group were 0.63 (0.42, 0.94) and 0.52 (0.38, 0.71) times those in the unfortified group, respectively. Fortification had no effect on serum retinol (0.61: 0.25,1.51), ferritin (1.12: 0.43, 2.96), or mean red cell volume (1.16: 0.82, 1.64). Therefore, a micronutrient-fortified seasoning powder is a promising vehicle for improving zinc, iodine, and hemoglobin status, and its potential for incorporation into lunch programs in day care centers and schools in NE Thailand warrants investigation.
    Journal of Nutrition 07/2006; 136(6):1617-23. · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Micronutrient deficiencies during childhood can contribute to impairments in growth, immune competence, and mental and physical development, and the coexistence of several such deficiencies can adversely affect the efficacy of single micronutrient interventions. To assess the prevalence of zinc and iodine deficiency and their interrelationships with vitamin A deficiency and anemia and associations with socio-economic status, hemoglobin type, and anthropometry in a cross-sectional study. A total of 10 primary schools in North East Thailand. Non-fasting venipuncture blood samples and casual urine samples were collected from 567 children aged 6-13 years. Anthropometric measures and serum zinc, albumin, C-reactive protein and urinary iodine, are reported here and integrated with published data on vitamin A, anemia, and socio-economic status. Of the children, 57% had low serum zinc and 83% had urinary iodine levels below the 100 microg/l cutoff. Suboptimal serum zinc and urinary iodine concentrations may result from low intakes of zinc and iodized salt. Significant risk factors for low serum zinc were serum retinol <1.05 micromol/l and being male. Those for urinary iodine <100 microg/l were height-for-age score>median and being female. For serum retinol <1.05 micromol/l, risk factors were low hemoglobin, low serum zinc, and <9 years, and for low hemoglobin indicative of anemia risk factors were <9 years, AE hemoglobinopathy, and serum retinol <1.05 micromol/l. Of the children, 60% were at risk of two or more coexisting micronutrient deficiencies, most commonly suboptimal urinary iodine and low serum zinc. The findings emphasize the need for multimicronutrient interventions in North East Thailand.
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 05/2006; 60(5):623-32. · 2.76 Impact Factor
  • N. Jitnarin, V. Kosulwat, A. Boonpraderm
    Journal of The American Dietetic Association - J AMER DIET ASSN. 01/2006; 106(8).
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents data on consumption patterns, methods of food procurement, and adequacy of dietary intake among Burmese refugee camp households living along Thailand's border with Burma. Households established for one or more years and with children under 15 years of age were sampled. A questionnaire was used to determine economic, food-consumption, and dietary intake patterns; foods consumed were weighed and measured using a 24-hour recall for the household unit; and nutritional status was determined by a Microtoise tape and digital standing scales. In total, 182 households containing 1,159 people were surveyed. The average household energy and protein intakes were 96.6% and 111.4%, respectively, of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for healthy Thais. Twelve percent of protein was derived from animal sources. Carbohydrate, protein, and fat accounted for 84%, 9%, and 7% of total energy, respectively. The intake of vitamins A, B1, B2, and C and of calcium ranged from 24.2% to 53.1% of the RDA. Iron intake was 85.3% of the RDA, derived mainly from rice, fermented fish, mung beans, green leafy vegetables, and eggs. Ration foods supplied 60.5% to 98.18% of all nutrients consumed in the households, with the exception of vitamins A and C. Among children under five years of age, 33.7% were underweight, 36.4% were studied, and 8.7% were wasted. Although the refugees were able to procure some nonration foods by foraging, planting trees and vegetables, raising animals, and purchasing and exchanging ration foods for other items, the quantity and quality were not sufficient to compensate for the nutrients that were low or lacking in the ration. The overwhelming majority of dietary nutrients were provided by ration foods, and although the ration and the overall diet may be adequate for short-term subsistence, they do not suffice for long-term survival and optimal growth, especially for younger children.
    Food and nutrition bulletin 01/2004; 24(4):360-7. · 2.11 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

89 Citations
22.49 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Mahidol University
      • Institute of Nutrition
      Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 2010–2011
    • National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
      New York City, New York, United States
    • NDRI-USA, Inc.
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Missouri - Kansas City
      • School of Medicine
      Kansas City, MO, United States