Hella L Aberson

University of Amsterdam, Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (6)40.45 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 expression in tumor cells is associated with disease progression and overall survival in a variety of cancers of epithelial origin; however, the importance of PAR-1 in the tumor microenvironment remains unexplored. Utilizing an orthotopic pancreatic cancer model in which tumor cells are PAR-1 positive whereas stromal cells are PAR-1 negative, we show that PAR-1 expression in the microenvironment drives progression and induces chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer. PAR-1 enhances monocyte recruitment into the tumor microenvironment by regulating monocyte migration and fibroblast dependent chemokine production thereby inducing chemoresistance. Overall, our data identify a novel role of PAR-1 in the pancreatic tumor microenvironment and suggest that PAR-1 may be an attractive target to reduce drug resistance in pancreatic cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    International Journal of Cancer 01/2014; · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tissue factor (TF) is traditionally known as the initiator of blood coagulation, but TF also plays an important role in inflammatory processes. Considering the pivotal role of coagulation in inflammatory bowel disease, we assessed whether genetic ablation of TF limits experimental colitis. To this end, wild-type and TF-deficient (TFlow) mice were treated with 1.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for 7 d, and effects on disease severity, cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment were examined. Clinical and histological parameters showed that the severity of colitis was reduced in both heterozygous and homozygous TFlow mice compared with controls. Most notably, edema, granulocyte numbers at the site of inflammation and cytokine levels were reduced in TFlow mice. Although anticoagulant treatment with dalteparin of wild-type mice reduced local fibrin production and cytokine levels to a similar extent as in TFlow mice, it did not affect clinical and histological parameters of experimental colitis. Mechanistic studies revealed that TF expression did not influence the intrinsic capacity of granulocytes to migrate. Instead, TF enhanced granulocyte migration into the colon by inducing high levels of the granulocyte chemoattractant keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC). Taken together, our data indicate that TF plays a detrimental role in experimental colitis by signal transduction-dependent KC production in colon epithelial cells, thereby provoking granulocyte influx with subsequent inflammation and organ damage.
    Molecular Medicine 06/2011; 17(9-10):1119-26. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The development of resistance against chemotherapy remains one of the major challenges in the clinical management of leukemia. There is still limited insight into the molecular mechanisms that maintain the chemotherapy-resistant phenotype, despite the obvious clinical relevance that such knowledge would have. In this study, we show that the chemotherapy-resistant phenotype of myeloid leukemia cells correlates with activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, whereas in chemosensitive cells, such activation is less pronounced. Importantly, the overexpression of Hh pathway components induces chemoprotection and inhibition of the pathway reverts chemoresistance of Lucena-1 cells, apparently by interfering with P-glycoprotein-dependent drug resistance. Our data thus identify the Hh pathway as an essential component of multidrug resistance (MDR) myeloid leukemia and suggest that targeting the Hh pathway might be an interesting therapeutic avenue for overcoming MDR resistance in myeloid leukemia.
    Oncogene 12/2010; 29(48):6314-22. · 8.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In spite of major advances in reperfusion therapy for patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome, long-term morbidity is still substantial. A limitation of initial treatment of myocardial ischemia is the lack of prevention of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Activated protein C (APC), a crucial mediator in the coagulation process, plays a prominent role in the crosstalk between coagulation and inflammation and provides cytoprotective effects via inhibition of apoptosis and inflammation in several human and animal studies. APC was administered in an animal model for myocardial I/R. APC largely inhibited early myocardial I/R injury after varying reperfusion times, an effect that was absent on administration of heparin, a nonspecific anticoagulant agent. The protective effects of APC were absent in case of absence or blockade of protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), indicating a critical role for PAR-1 in this process. Furthermore, we showed a strong antiapoptotic effect of APC in the early phase of reperfusion combined with an antiinflammatory effect at an early stage (IL-6), as well as at a later stage (leukocyte infiltration). APC exerts strong protective effects on early myocardial I/R injury, primarily via inhibition of apoptosis and inflammation, which are regulated via PAR-1.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 05/2009; 29(7):1087-92. · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inhibition of specific coagulation pathways such as the factor VIIa-tissue factor complex has been shown to attenuate ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, but the cellular mechanisms have not been explored. To determine the cellular mechanisms involved in the working mechanism of active site inhibited factor VIIa (ASIS) in the protection against myocardial I/R injury. We investigated the effects of a specific mouse recombinant in a mouse model of myocardial I/R injury. One hour of ischemia was followed by 2, 6 or 24 h of reperfusion. Mouse ASIS or placebo was administered before and after induction of reperfusion. ASIS administration reduced myocardial I/R injury by more than 40% at three reperfusion times. Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis showed reduced mRNA expression in the ischemic myocardium of CD14, TLR-4, interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) and IkappaBalpha upon ASIS administration, indicative of inhibition of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) and subsequent nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) mediated cell signaling. Levels of nuclear activated NF-kappaB and proteins influenced by the NF-kappaB pathway including tissue factor (TF) and IL-6 that were increased after I/R, were attenuated upon ASIS administration. After 6 and 24 h of reperfusion, neutrophil infiltration into the area of infarction was decreased upon ASIS administration. There was, however, no evidence of an effect of ASIS on apoptosis (Tunel staining and MLPA analysis). We conclude that the diminished amount of myocardial I/R injury after ASIS administration is primarily due to attenuated inflammation-related lethal I/R injury, probably mediated through the NF-kappaB mechanism.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 12/2008; 7(2):290-8. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The current interest in expression of groups of functionally related genes creates a demand for novel experimental tools. We describe a multiplex ligation-dependent amplification procedure (RT-MLPA), which accurately quantifies up to 45 transcripts of interest in a one-tube assay. The output, a set of fluorescent DNA fragments, is analysed via capillary sequencer and spreadsheet software. The procedure is highly sensitive and reproducible over a 100-fold range of input RNA, with excellent compatibility with RT-PCR and microarrays. We targeted two comprehensive sets of human genes: 35 apoptosis regulators and 30 genes involved in inflammation. Both probe sets accurately assessed specific changes in gene expression in two relevant model systems. Stimulation of lymphocytes with various Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands induced distinct inflammatory profiles. Furthermore, osteosarcoma cells treated with cytostatic drugs showed as primary response strong up-regulation of the apoptogenic p53-inducible PUMA transcript. Suppression by RNAi validated that indeed Puma expression was responsible for apoptosis induction. Thus, RT-MLPA enables relevant changes in transcription patterns to be quickly pinpointed and guide further experiments. This can be an advantage compared to hypothesis-free whole genome screens where large numbers of differentially expressed genes can obscure functional interpretation.
    Nucleic Acids Research 01/2004; 31(23):e153. · 8.81 Impact Factor