Rosângela C Lima

Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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Publications (34)89.63 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Conflicting findings on the risk of obesity among subjects born by caesarean section have been published. Caesarean section should also increase the risk of obesity related cardiovascular risk factors if type of delivery is associated with obesity later in life. This study was aimed at assessing the effect of type of delivery on metabolic cardiovascular risk factors in early adulthood. In 1982, maternity hospitals in Pelotas, southern Brazil, were visited and those livebirths whose family lived in the urban area of the city have been followed. In 2000, when male subjects undertook the Army entrance examination (n=2200), fat mass and fat free mass were estimated through bioimpedance. In 2004-2005, we attempted to follow the whole cohort (n=4297), and the following outcomes were studied: blood pressure; HDL cholesterol; triglycerides; random blood glucose, C-reactive protein, waist circumference and body mass index. The estimates were adjusted for the following confounders: family income at birth; maternal schooling; household assets index in childhood; maternal skin color; birth order; maternal age; maternal prepregnancy weight; maternal height; maternal smoking during pregnancy; birthweight and family income at early adulthood. In the crude analyses, blood pressure (systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure) and body mass index were higher among subjects who were delivered through caesarean section. After controlling for confounders, systolic blood pressure was 1.15 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 0.05; 2.25) higher among subjects delivered by caesarean section, and BMI 0.40 kg/m(2) (95% confidence interval: 0.08; 0.71). After controlling for BMI the effect on systolic blood pressure dropped to 0.60 mmHg (95% confidence interval: -0.47; 1.67). Fat mass at 18 years of age was also higher among subjects born by caesarean section. Caesarean section was associated with a small increased in systolic blood pressure, body mass index and fat mass.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(9):e74301. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the effect of weight gain in childhood on blood lipid levels in adolescence. A population-based birth cohort carried out in Pelotas, Southern Brazil. All newborns in the city's hospitals were enrolled in 1982. The subjects have been followed up for several times in childhood. At age 18, 79% of all males were followed, and 2083 blood samples were available. Adjusted analyses controlled for household assets index, family income, parental schooling at birth, maternal smoking during pregnancy and breastfeeding duration. Birth weight for gestational age and weight gain in the first 20 months was not associated with blood lipid levels in adolescence. On the other hand, those subjects whose weight gain from 20 to 42 months of age was faster than that predicted from birth weight and weight-for-age z-score at the mean age of 20 months had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) cholesterol [-0.78(95% confidence interval: -1.28; -0.29)] and higher very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL)/HDL ratio in adolescence. After controlling for current body mass index (BMI), the regression coefficient for HDL cholesterol decreased from -0.78 mg/dL to -0.29 mg/dL (95% confidence interval: -1.00 to 0.05). Weight gain from 2 to 4 years is related to an atherogenic lipid profile in adolescence and this association is mediated by current BMI.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2009; 98(6):1024-8. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the prevalence of wheezing in the chest among adults, and to explore the effect of some variables on the prevalence of this condition. This was a prospective cohort study on individuals born in the city of Pelotas (Southern Brazil) in 1982. A total of 4,297 subjects was traced in 2004-5, representing 77.4% of the original cohort. Data were collected by means of interviews using the ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Steering Committee) questionnaire. Associations between the outcome 'occurrence of wheezing in the chest within the 12 months prior to the interview' and the variables of socioeconomic, demographic and birth characteristics were tested by means of multivariable analyses, using Poisson regression. The prevalence of wheezing over the preceding year was 24.9%. Among the individuals reporting wheezing, 54.6% reported difficulty in sleeping, and 12.9% reported difficulty in speaking due to wheezing. The prevalence of wheezing in the chest was significantly higher among women. This association was maintained in analyses adjusted for non-white skin color, family history of asthma and low socioeconomic level. Among men, there was no significant association in the analyses adjusted for skin color and family income at birth. Family histories of asthma and poverty throughout life presented significant associations with wheezing in the chest. For both sexes, there were no associations with the variables of birth weight and breastfeeding duration. The prevalence of wheezing in the chest was high, and subjects with low family income at birth were more likely to have had wheezing in the chest over the preceding year.
    Revista de saude publica 01/2009; 42 Suppl 2:101-7. · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate socioeconomic, gestational and early life exposures as potential determinants of total height, leg and trunk length. Male subjects from the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study were examined in 1986 at home, and in 2000 when registering at the local army base. The follow-up rate was 79%. Standing and sitting heights were measured on both occasions. Leg length was calculated as the difference between standing and sitting heights. Outcome measures were height, leg and trunk length at 4 and 18 years and growth in this period. Complete data were obtained for 2012 participants, representing 71% of all eligible male subjects. Mean (s.d.) height, trunk length and leg length at 18 years were 173.4 (6.8), 96.0 (3.5) and 77.5 cm (4.5), respectively. The mean (s.d.) change in height from 1986 to 2000 was 75.4 cm (5.2) and for leg and trunk length 35.4 (3.9) and 40.0 cm (2.9), respectively. Of 11 independent variables analyzed, only maternal height and birthweight were associated with all three variables of growth. Gestational age showed no associations with growth or attained size. Early growth plays a pivotal role in determining attained height and its components. Both biological and socioeconomic variables strongly influence determinants of height, though socioeconomic factors appear to be more important in early growth. Leg and trunk length contribute almost equally to differences in overall height, regardless of the independent variable influencing the difference. Public health strategies designed to improve chronic disease profiles should focus on the early growth period.
    European journal of clinical nutrition 03/2008; 63(3):375-81. · 3.07 Impact Factor
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    Revista De Saude Publica - REV SAUDE PUBL. 01/2008; 42.
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the relationship between weight catch-up in infancy and achieved schooling at 18 years of age in Brazilian males. All newborn infants in the city's hospitals were enrolled in 1982; 78.8% (2250) of all male participants were located at age 18 years when enrolling in the national army. According to the Brazilian school calendar, 18-year-olds should be attending the 11th grade, but school failure was very common and 78.5% of all subjects had failed at least once. The average achieved schooling was 7.7 years (s.d.=2.3). After controlling for possible confounding variables, birthweight was positively associated with achieved schooling. With respect to postnatal growth, weight gain in the first 20 months was associated with increased schooling. Among SGA infants who caught-up in weight, achieved schooling was 1.3 higher. Data from a cross-sectional survey in the same population suggest that such a difference corresponds to a 25% difference in adult income levels. The study showed that early weight catch-up is associated with achieved schooling. The beneficial effects of early weight gain should be balanced against its potential harms.
    European journal of clinical nutrition 11/2007; 63(3):369-74. · 3.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The presence of anti-heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) antibodies in healthy individuals and the association of these antibodies with diseases such as arthritis and atherosclerosis are well documented. However, there is limited population-level data on interindividual variation in anti-Hsp60 levels. We investigated the influence of early-life factors on IgG reactivity to human Hsp60 at age 18 years. A population-based prospective birth cohort study included 5914 births in the city of Pelotas, Brazil, in 1982. Early-life exposures were documented during home visits in childhood. In 2000, 79% of all males in the cohort were traced. Sera from a systematic 20% sample (411 subjects) were analyzed. Anti-Hsp60 total IgG reactivity was determined by ELISA. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and generalized linear models. Anti-Hsp60 reactivity was lognormally distributed and showed a significant direct correlation with low birthweight (p=0.039) and total duration of breastfeeding (p=0.018), of which only the latter remained significant after adjustment for potential confounders. Reactivity was not associated with asthma, pneumonia, diarrhea, or early-life malnutrition. Mother-child immunological interactions, rather than infection/disease factors seem to be associated with reactivity to Hsp60 later in life. This is in agreement with the hypothesis that maternal antibodies influence future antibody profile.
    Journal of Autoimmunity 09/2007; 29(1):38-43. · 8.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The evidence for an association between poor nutrition in early life and subsequent obesity is inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated the associations between stunting, wasting and underweight at 2 and 4 years of age, and body composition in adolescence in male subjects studied since birth. The 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study included all children born in maternity hospitals and living in the urban area of the city of Pelotas, Southern Brazil. All males born in 1982 were legally required to enlist in the army between January and April 2000. We were thus able to track 2250 subjects in 2000 (78.9% of the original cohort). Anthropometric measurements were collected in 1984 and 1986, and body composition was assessed in 2000. In the present analysis, we used as predictors the nutritional indices height-for-age, weight-for-height and weight-for-age presented in six categories. Outcomes included fat, lean and body mass indices and fat:lean mass ratio, derived from anthropometric and bioimpedance measurements. ANOVA and linear regression were used in the analyses to adjust for confounding. All predictors were positively associated with fat and body mass indices. Height-for-age Z score at age 2 or 4 years was not associated with lean mass index, but all other predictors were associated. Fat:lean mass ratio was associated only with weight-for-height Z score. Our results suggest that undernutrition is not a risk factor for overweight and obesity in our population and may partially protect against fatness in adolescence.
    British Journal Of Nutrition 06/2007; 97(5):949-54. · 3.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The fetal origins hypothesis states that nutritional deprivation in utero affects fetal development and contributes to the incidence of diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome in later life. This study investigated whether haemoglobin (Hb) A(1c), an indicator of blood glucose, varied among healthy male adolescents according to their fetal growth rate, in a middle-income setting. Participants were men aged 18 years, belonging to the 1982 Pelotas birth cohort. Complete data, including gestational age and Hb A(1c) at age 18 years, were available for 197 individuals. There was an inverse association between mean Hb A(1c) and birthweight for the gestational age, but not birthweight alone. The association remained significant after adjustment for family income and mother's education, as well as for body mass index at 18 years (P for trend=0.01 and 0.03, respectively).
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 04/2007; 61(3):434-7. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the association between weight gain at different time periods during childhood and measures of adiposity in late adolescence. A population-based birth cohort carried out in Pelotas, a 320 000-inhabitant city in a relatively developed area in Southern Brazil. All newborns in the city's hospitals were enrolled in 1982. Weight gain from 0-1, 1-2, 2-4 and 4-15 years were expressed as changes in weight-for-age Z-scores relative to the NCHS/WHO reference. In 2000, 79% (2250) of all males were located when enrolling at the national Army. Weight and height were assessed. Body composition indicators (fat mass/height(2), lean mass/height(2), fat mass/lean mass(2.3)) were estimated through bioimpedance. Analyses were adjusted for maternal and social factors, as well as for gestational age. In the adjusted analyses, birthweight and weight gain in the first year of life were positively associated with attained height at age 18 years. Except for the fat mass/lean mass(2.3) ratio, all weight-related outcomes were positively associated with weight gain in different periods of life. Children who gained weight rapidly in more than one time period became fatter at age 18 years, independently of when fast growth took place. Height was primarily determined by fetal and infant growth. Weight-related indices, including the fat/lean mass ratio, were more strongly influenced by later growth. No clear critical windows of growth during which absolute tissue masses are programmed could be identified.
    Acta Paediatrica 03/2007; 96(2):296-300. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: To assess the association between weight gain at different time periods during childhood and measures of adiposity in late adolescence.Methods: A population-based birth cohort carried out in Pelotas, a 320 000-inhabitant city in a relatively developed area in Southern Brazil. All newborns in the city's hospitals were enrolled in 1982. Weight gain from 0–1, 1–2, 2–4 and 4–15 years were expressed as changes in weight-for-age Z-scores relative to the NCHS/WHO reference. In 2000, 79% (2250) of all males were located when enrolling at the national Army. Weight and height were assessed. Body composition indicators (fat mass/height2, lean mass/height2, fat mass/lean mass2.3) were estimated through bioimpedance. Analyses were adjusted for maternal and social factors, as well as for gestational age.Results: In the adjusted analyses, birthweight and weight gain in the first year of life were positively associated with attained height at age 18 years. Except for the fat mass/lean mass2.3 ratio, all weight-related outcomes were positively associated with weight gain in different periods of life. Children who gained weight rapidly in more than one time period became fatter at age 18 years, independently of when fast growth took place.Conclusions: Height was primarily determined by fetal and infant growth. Weight-related indices, including the fat/lean mass ratio, were more strongly influenced by later growth. No clear critical windows of growth during which absolute tissue masses are programmed could be identified.
    Acta Paediatrica 01/2007; 96(2):296 - 300. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess the relationship between breastfeeding duration and blood pressure in a large birth cohort of Brazilians followed from birth to adolescence. Methods: All 5914 hospital births occurring in Pelotas in 1982 (over 99% of all deliveries) were studied prospectively. Detailed information on feeding practices was prospectively collected during childhood. In 1997 and 2001 we attempted to trace a sample of the cohort, whereas in 2000 we identified the male subjects when presenting for the army recruitment exam. Blood pressure measurements were taken in 1997 for both sexes, males in 2000 and females in 2001. Results: Information on breastfeeding collected between 1983 and 1986 was available for 90.8% of the 5914 original cohort subjects. We managed to follow 1076, 2250 and 1031 subjects in 1997, 2000 and 2001, respectively. Total breastfeeding duration was not associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adolescence. Diastolic blood pressure at the age of 15 y (1997) was higher among girls who had been predominantly breastfed for at least 4 mo. After controlling for confounding variables (family income, maternal education at birth and maternal BMI at birth, skin colour, birthweight, gestational age, maternal smoking during pregnancy, adolescent smoking and alcohol drinking), the strength of the association was reduced and the 95% confidence interval encompassed the other blood pressure estimates. Furthermore, such association was not replicated in the 2001 follow-up visit.Conclusion: Breastfeeding duration was not related to blood pressure in adolescence.
    Acta Paediatrica 01/2007; 95(3):325 - 331. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this work we explored the association of height and overweight with change in socioeconomic position between birth and 19 years of age. A birth cohort has been followed-up in Pelotas, Brazil, since 1982. All 5914 hospital births were enrolled in the study just after delivery. In 2001, 27% of the cohort subjects were sought, and 1031 (69% of the survivors) were interviewed. Weight and height were obtained for women; men had been examined 6 months earlier. Information on family income in 1982 and 2001 was used to classify the sample into tertiles, the lowest classified as 'poor' and the other two as 'non-poor'. Four trajectories resulted: always poor, never poor, poor at birth/non-poor at 19, and non-poor at birth/poor at 19-which were compared in terms of mean height and prevalence of overweight. Height showed a similar behaviour for men and women, with the never poor presenting the highest mean, followed by those who were non-poor at birth and later became poor. Those who were poor at birth, regardless of later status, were shortest. Overweight was approximately twice as common among men who were never poor in relation to the others. Among women, those who were always poor presented the highest prevalence of overweight. In this case, social determination seems to be complex and may involve aspects of lifestyle and behaviour acting differently for each gender. Socioeconomic trajectories affected both height and overweight, the effect on the latter being different for each gender.
    International Journal of Epidemiology 11/2006; 35(5):1233-8. · 6.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the association between breast feeding and blood lipid levels in adolescence. Population based prospective birth cohort study. City of Pelotas, Brazil. All hospital births taking place in 1982; 79% of all males (n = 2250) were followed up for 18 years, and 2089 blood samples were available. None. Total cholesterol and fractions (very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL)), LDL/HDL ratio, serum triglycerides. Three breast feeding variables were studied: total duration of breast feeding, duration of exclusive or predominant breast feeding, and ever compared with never breast fed. Adjusted analyses were controlled for family income, household assets index, maternal education, maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), skin colour, birth weight, gestational age, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and adolescent BMI, and behavioural variables (fat content of diet, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol drinking). Only one association reached borderline significance (p = 0.05): LDL cholesterol was slightly higher among never (mean 41.0 mg/dl; 95% CI 39.4 to 42.7) than among ever breast fed men (38.6 mg/dl; 95% CI 38.6 to 40.3), in the adjusted analyses. All other associations were not significant (p> or =0.09). There was no evidence of effect modification according to preterm status, intrauterine growth retardation, socioeconomic level, growth velocity in the first two years of life, or nutritional status at 2 years of age. There was no clear association between breast feeding duration and serum lipid concentrations at the age of 18 years in this sample of Brazilian men.
    Journal of Epidemiology &amp Community Health 08/2006; 60(7):621-5. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the relationship between breastfeeding duration and blood pressure in a large birth cohort of Brazilians followed from birth to adolescence. All 5914 hospital births occurring in Pelotas in 1982 (over 99% of all deliveries) were studied prospectively. Detailed information on feeding practices was prospectively collected during childhood. In 1997 and 2001 we attempted to trace a sample of the cohort, whereas in 2000 we identified the male subjects when presenting for the army recruitment exam. Blood pressure measurements were taken in 1997 for both sexes, males in 2000 and females in 2001. Information on breastfeeding collected between 1983 and 1986 was available for 90.8% of the 5914 original cohort subjects. We managed to follow 1076, 2250 and 1031 subjects in 1997, 2000 and 2001, respectively. Total breastfeeding duration was not associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adolescence. Diastolic blood pressure at the age of 15 y (1997) was higher among girls who had been predominantly breastfed for at least 4 mo. After controlling for confounding variables (family income, maternal education at birth and maternal BMI at birth, skin colour, birthweight, gestational age, maternal smoking during pregnancy, adolescent smoking and alcohol drinking), the strength of the association was reduced and the 95% confidence interval encompassed the other blood pressure estimates. Furthermore, such association was not replicated in the 2001 follow-up visit. Breastfeeding duration was not related to blood pressure in adolescence.
    Acta Paediatrica 04/2006; 95(3):325-31. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of biological and social background on height of adolescent girls at age 19 y in the city of Pelotas, Southern Brazil. In 2001, a sample of the urban census tracts was visited and adolescent girls who were part of the Pelotas 1982 Birth Cohort Study were located. Standardized questionnaires were administered to the adolescents and their mothers. Height was measured using locally manufactured stadiometers; standardized protocols were employed. The information obtained in 2001 was combined with data collected in earlier phases of the study. The follow-up rate was 69% and 473 girls were studied in 2001. Multiple linear regressions were used to analyze the determinants of height. The height of the 19-y-old adolescents was 161.2+/-6.3 cm. The significant determinants of height were family income, maternal pre-gestational weight, maternal height, smoking during pregnancy, birth weight, height gain, and age at menarche. Birth weight was a more important predictor than weight gain during infancy or height gain between the ages of 2 and 4 y. Each 100 g in birth weight was associated with an increase of approximately 0.2 cm in the adolescent's height (P=0.001). The current findings reinforce the importance of early life factors in the determination of adult height.
    Journal of Nutrition 03/2006; 136(2):473-8. · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the main methodological aspects of a cohort study, with emphasis on its recent phases, which may be relevant to investigators planning to carry out similar studies. In 1993, a population based study was launched in Pelotas, Southern Brazil. All 5,249 newborns delivered in the city's hospitals were enrolled, and sub-samples were visited at the ages of one, three and six months and of one and four years. In 2004-5 it was possible to trace 87.5% of the cohort at the age of 10-12 years. Sub-studies are addressing issues related to oral health, psychological development and mental health, body composition, and ethnography. Birth cohort studies are essential for investigating the early determinants of adult disease and nutritional status, yet few such studies are available from low and middle-income countries where these determinants may differ from those documented in more developed settings.
    Revista de Saúde Pública 03/2006; 40(1):39-46. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the effect of breastfeeding duration on school achievement in a Brazilian cohort. In a population-based birth cohort, we analysed the highest grade achieved in school of over 2,000 male 18-y-olds relative to breastfeeding information collected in early life. Analyses were adjusted for birthweight, family income, maternal and paternal schooling, household assets, number of siblings, social class, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and ethnicity. After adjustment for confounding variables, there was a highly significant trend in school achievement with increasing breastfeeding duration. Those breastfed for 9 mo or more were ahead by 0.5-0.8 school grades, relative to those breastfed for less than 1 mo. Data from a cross-sectional survey in the same population suggest that such a difference corresponds to a 10-15% difference in adult income levels. The duration of exclusive or predominant breastfeeding was also positively associated with schooling. Unlike studies from developed countries, there was no clear association between breastfeeding duration and either the family's socio-economic level or parental schooling in our sample and therefore residual confounding is improbable. These results suggest that the impact of breastfeeding on intellectual development may lead to sizeable differences in adult education and wage-earning performance.
    Acta Paediatrica 12/2005; 94(11):1656-60. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study the associations between respiratory function in 18-year-old male subjects and birth weight, preterm delivery, and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Population-based birth cohort. Subsamples of 118 male subjects with low birth weight (LBW) [< 2,500 g] and 236 male subjects with normal birth weight were examined at the age of 18 years. In the crude analysis, subjects with LBW showed reductions in FEV1 and FVC of 0.166 L and 0.141 L, respectively, compared to those born weighing > or = 2,500 g. These differences were not significant after adjustment for confounding. When subjects with LBW were stratified into those with preterm delivery and those with IUGR, the latter presented a significant reduction in both FEV1 and FVC, when compared to the reference group. These differences also disappeared after adjustment for confounders. Preterm delivery per se was also not associated with poor lung function. In this population, LBW was not associated with respiratory function in 18-year-old male subjects.
    Chest 10/2005; 128(4):2400-7. · 7.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To use a case-control study to analyze risk factors associated with teenage childbearing among adolescents who were in a birth cohort study that began in 1982 in the city of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Adolescent mothers in Pelotas who gave birth between January 1995 and March 2001 and who had been born in 1982 were identified through the local birth information system. These subjects from the 1982 birth cohort were compared to adolescents from the same cohort who had not given birth before March 2001. Standardized interviews were used in 2001 to obtain information about socioeconomic, maternal reproductive, demographic, and lifestyle characteristics. This information was combined with data obtained in earlier phases of this 1982 birth cohort study. Unconditional logistic regression was used to analyze the risk factors associated with childbearing during adolescence. A total of 420 parous adolescents from the 1982 birth cohort were identified and then compared with 408 cohort adolescents who had not given birth by March 2001. Higher family income in 1982 and more parental schooling in 1982 were inversely related to childbearing among the birth cohort adolescents. Cohort girls whose mothers were under age 20 when they gave birth in 1982 had a higher risk of becoming pregnant while still an adolescent. Cohort girls who, during childhood, lived with siblings from different fathers were twice as likely to become an adolescent mother. Compared to cohort adolescents who had not failed during the first four years of school, those girls who had done so had twice the risk of giving birth during adolescence. Among the cohort girls a positive association was found between younger age at first intercourse and childbearing in adolescence. The results indicate that the educational level of the adolescent mothers must be considered in planning policies that attempt to disrupt successive cycles of socioeconomic deprivation. Early interventions to improve sex education and to increase the motivation of young girls to achieve higher levels of education are needed. The interventions should aim for a reduction in the risk of long-term poverty and poorer educational achievements of teenage mothers and their children.
    Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública 08/2004; 16(1):1-10. · 0.85 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

407 Citations
89.63 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2013
    • Universidade Federal de Pelotas
      • Faculty of Medicine (FM)
      Pelotas, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  • 2007–2009
    • Universidade Católica de Pelotas (UCPel)
      São Francisco de Paula, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  • 1999
    • Prefeitura Municipal de Campinas
      Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil